New York

Physician-Assisted Suicide

Published on April 9th, 2019

Memorandum of Opposition

Re: A.2694 Paulin / S.3947 Savino
In relation to legalizing physician-assisted suicide

The above-referenced bill would add a new section of the Public Health Law to allow physicians to prescribe lethal doses of medication for the express purpose of ending a patient’s life.

The New York State
Catholic Conference opposes this
bill for many reasons.

Legalizing physician-assisted suicide would:

  • Blur longstanding medical, moral and legal distinctions between withdrawing extraordinary medical assistance and taking active steps to destroy human life. The former removes burdensome or useless treatments, allowing nature to take its course, and allowing the patient to either live or die. The latter is the deliberate and direct act of making a patient dead. In 2017, New York’s highest court said this distinction is “important, logical, and certainly rational,” adding that “it turns on intent.” (See Myers v. Schneiderman, September 7, 2017)
  • Undermine the physician’s role as healer, forever altering the doctor-patient relationship, and lessen the quality of care provided to patients at the end of life. Patients are best served when medical professionals, together with families and loved ones, provide support and care with dignity and respect, not lethal doses of drugs. The American Medical Association continues to hold a strong policy position against physician-assisted suicide, which they say is “fundamentally incompatible with the physician’s role” and would be “difficult or impossible to control.”
  • Lead to psychological, financial and other pressures for vulnerable persons to end their lives. In today’s era of health care rationing and cost-cutting, physician-assisted suicide could easily rise to the level of the most acceptable, and even expected, “treatment” for terminal illness. In 1994, Governor Mario Cuomo’s Task Force on Life the Law released a report unanimously rejecting assisted suicide, and cautioned: “No matter how carefully any guidelines are framed, assisted suicide and euthanasia will be practiced through the prism of social inequality and bias that characterizes the delivery of services in all segments of society, including health care. The practices will pose the greatest risks to those who are poor, elderly, members of a minority group or without access to good medical care. The growing concern about health care costs increases the risks. This cost consciousness will not be diminished, and may well be exacerbated, by health care reform.”

This particular legislation contains many of the same fatal flaws contained in previous versions:

  • It does not require screening, testing, or treatment for clinical depression;
  • It requires a physician to list the underlying illness as the cause of death, making it impossible to know how widely this form of suicide is being practiced, thus making it impossible to track abuses; and
  • It contains absolutely no safeguards against coercion or abuse once the lethal drugs are in the patient’s possession.

In recent weeks,
both Connecticut and Maryland have rejected similar legislation to legalize the
practice of physicians providing life-ending drugs to their patients. Yet the
New York legislation contains no residency requirement, opening the door to
out-of-state visitors obtaining lethal drugs here, and the possibility of
suicide clinics to handle the tourism traffic.

Rather than assisting suicide, government
should be consistent in its efforts to prevent suicide.It is illogical for the state to promote/facilitate suicide for
one group of persons — calling the suicides of those with a terminal illness
and a specific prognosis “dignified and humane,” while recognizing suicide as a
serious statewide public health concern in all other circumstances, and
spending enormous resources to combat it.

We urge the state
to remove barriers and improve access to palliative care and hospice care for
those in the final stages of terminal illness. Improved education and training
of physicians in pain management, together with appropriate diagnosis and
treatment for depression, would go a long way toward eliminating calls for
suicide among the sick and the dying.

We strongly urge you to oppose this bill.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/physician-assisted-suicide/

Catholic Conference, Catholic Charities Call on SCOTUS to Reject Citizenship Question in Census

Published on April 8th, 2019


Photo by Josh Sobel on Unsplash

The New York State Catholic Conference, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, and Catholic Charities Brooklyn and Queens, are calling on the United States Supreme Court to uphold a lower court ruling blocking a proposed question on citizenship from appearing on the 2020 U.S. Census. 

The Catholic entities, joining with other religious and secular human services organizations, filed an amicus curiae (friend of the court) brief supporting a lawsuit brought by New York and several other states and entities against the United States Department of Commerce. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear the case April 23 following a favorable decision for the plaintiffs in federal district court in the Southern District of New York in January, which the government has appealed. 

In the brief, the organizations argue, first, that Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, Jr.’s decision to add a citizenship question violated the law because he failed to report to Congress well in advance of the census that he intended to do so. This failure, the amici argued, violates the separation of powers and “has a pernicious anti-democratic effect.”

Furthermore, they argued, the decision to add the citizenship question “will undoubtedly cause a severe undercount of noncitizen and Hispanic households” that would result in harm that “is hard to exaggerate,” both to the human services organizations and to the individuals they serve.

Because of the presumed undercounting, states like New York would see an “unwarranted reduction in and reallocation of governmental funding” from federal programs that distribute funds based on census data, the brief argues.

“Those funding cuts threaten to cause widespread social chaos,” according to the brief, which said social service agencies that serve vulnerable populations “will be pushed to the breaking point” as a result. The result would be that the tens of thousands of New Yorkers who depend on these services “will be (quite literally) left out in the cold, without the services which they need and on which they depend.”

“To make matters worse,” the brief stated, “resource scarcity threatens to foment conflict between diverse racial, ethnic, and religious groups at a time when, for various other reasons, such tensions are already sadly on the rise in this country.”

In addition to the Catholic entities, other organizations joining the amicus brief include the American Jewish Committee, Commission of Religious Leaders of New York City, Council of Peoples Organization, Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies, Human Services Council, Jewish Association Serving the Aging, Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services, Jewish Community Relations Council of New York, Jewish Education Project, New York Board of Rabbis, and UJA-Federation of New York.

The amicus brief was prepared by Eamon P. Joyce, Qais Ghafary, and David S. Kanter of Sidley Austin LLP.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/census-release/

Catholic Conference, Catholic Charities Council Grateful for Human Services COLA in Budget Resolutions

Published on March 13th, 2019


Catholic Charities and other human services sector employees are a critical link in the social safety net.
(Photo courtesy Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Albany)

The New York State Catholic Conference and the Council
of Catholic Charities Directors are grateful that the New York State Senate and
Assembly both included in their one-house budget resolutions a 2.9 percent cost
of living adjustment (COLA) for the state’s human services sector.

“Catholic Charities and the state’s other human
services providers are an irreplaceable part of the state’s safety net for
vulnerable individuals and families. The funding of the human services COLA in
the legislature’s one-house budgets recognizes this fact,” said Michael Lawler,
director of Catholic Charities for the Catholic Conference. “We’re grateful to
the Senate and Assembly for acknowledging this economic justice issue, and we
urge that the COLA be included in the final negotiated budget.”

The Senate and Assembly resolutions represents a departure
from the Executive Budget proposal submitted by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, which
recommended deferring the COLA, as has occurred in eight of the last 10 years.

The Catholic Conference represents the Bishops of New
York State in public policy matters.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/cola-statement/

Statement on Human Services COLA

Published on March 13th, 2019


Catholic Charities and other human services sector employees are a critical link in the social safety net.
(Photo courtesy Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Albany)

The New York State Catholic Conference and the Council
of Catholic Charities Directors are grateful that the New York State Senate and
Assembly both included in their one-house budget resolutions a 2.9 percent cost
of living adjustment (COLA) for the state’s human services sector.

“Catholic Charities and the state’s other human
services providers are an irreplaceable part of the state’s safety net for
vulnerable individuals and families. The funding of the human services COLA in
the legislature’s one-house budgets recognizes this fact,” said Michael Lawler,
director of Catholic Charities for the Catholic Conference. “We’re grateful to
the Senate and Assembly for acknowledging this economic justice issue, and we
urge that the COLA be included in the final negotiated budget.”

The Senate and Assembly resolutions represents a departure
from the Executive Budget proposal submitted by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, which
recommended deferring the COLA, as has occurred in eight of the last 10 years.

The Catholic Conference represents the Bishops of New
York State in public policy matters.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/human-services-cola/

Late-Term Abortion Expansion: Resources for Education

Published on March 12th, 2019

Millions of New Yorkers are understandably upset by the state legislature’s 2019 enactment of abortion expansion. We’ve assembled some tools which you can use to educate others about this law, and encourage them to organize, educate, and spread the pro-life message.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/late-term-abortion-resources/

Ten tips for writing letters to the editor of your local newspaper about NYS’s new abortion law

Published on March 12th, 2019

Letters to the editor are an important advocacy tool. In addition to educating the public and the news media, elected officials pay attention to Letters Page conversations in their local papers to get a pulse on their constituents’ opinions on controversial issues. Below are 10 tips for effective letter writing, and some sample letters below that are intended solely as examples, rather than to be used exactly.

1. To be considered for publication, a letter to the editor should be a total length of between 100 and 200 words. You can check the specific requirements of any individual paper.

2. Always include your name, address and a daytime telephone number. Many news outlets call the letter-writer for verification.

3. It is best to email your letter to the editor, and place the content of your letter in the body of the email; do not send the letter as an attachment to your email.

4. Be respectful. Never use inflammatory language.

5. A letter is more likely to be published if the topic is tied to a recent news story or event. Keep your eyes on the news: if the legislature is considering new laws to benefit women, a letter about how the new abortion law harms women would be appropriate. If there’s a story about a new safety device for newborn babies, a letter about the harm to infants from the abortion law would fit in nicely

6. Know the facts. See our fact sheet about the new law. Don’t exaggerate or overstate the law. Just state the facts. The truth is powerful.

7. Stick with one main issue or point. Don’t try to include all the flaws in the Reproductive Health Act in one letter. Pick one topic and stay there. Keep it simple and understandable.

8 Use your own words. While we offer sample letters to the editor, it is always best to put the letter in your own words. A person’s passion and true feelings come through most effectively when they use their own heartfelt words.

9. You can use the Action Center on this website to send letters to editors easily and efficiently. Here’s how: Go to the “Take Action!” tab in the main menu above and click on Contact Local Media. Enter your home zip code and then your address. The system will display for you a directory of your federal officials, your state officials, and your local media (make sure to scroll down). Check off the news outlet to whom you’d like to send your letter, then hit the tab at the bottom that says “Compose Message.” Just enter your subject and write your letter in the space marked “Message Body.” Be sure to include your phone number at the end of your message, because many news outlets will not publish a letter without a phone number included for verification. Review your mailing address and click “Send Message.” It’s that simple!

10. Know that each time a letter is published, a seed is planted. The Letters section is one of the most widely read parts of most newspapers. It offers a free platform to reach a broad audience. Use it to provide readers with useful information and a call to take action.

Sample letters to the editor

TOPIC 1: THE NUMBER OF LATE-TERM ABORTIONS

I am shocked and saddened that Governor Cuomo and Democratic
lawmakers have passed a new and even more liberal abortion law than New York State
already had. Supporters say that late-term abortions occur very rarely, but
that’s not really true.

The most recent New York State Health Department statistics
show that in 2016, 1,763 abortions were performed at 20 weeks of pregnancy or
more. That doesn’t sound very rare to me. These are fully formed babies in the
womb who can be legally destroyed by abortion. These are not “clumps of cells”
or merely “parts of the woman’s body.” These are innocent infants, dozing,
kicking and sucking their thumbs.  And
even if those infants have a genetic disease or a prenatal abnormality, they
deserve the right to be born and to die a natural death. They do not deserve a
violent death by abortion.

Now that the state legislature has given permission to late-term abortionists to come in to New York to practice their trade, I fear that the number of abortions will go even higher.

TOPIC 2: THE “HEALTH” EXCEPTION

On January 22, the New York State Legislature passed and the
governor signed the “Reproductive Health Act,” an extreme new law that will
allow late-term abortions for virtually any reason. Here’s why.

The law adds a “health” exception to New York law, so that
abortions are now legal in the final three months of a woman’s pregnancy if her
“life or health” is endangered. Previously the law said that only if the
mother’s “life” was in danger was a third trimester abortion legal.

The problem is that the word “health” has been interpreted
by the US Supreme Court as including:

“… all factors – physical, emotional, psychological,
familial, and the woman’s age – relevant to the well-being of the patient. All
these factors may relate to health.” (See Doe vs. Bolton 1973)

The health exception allowing late-term abortions is a loophole big enough to drive a truck through. We should not be treating innocent human lives as if they were worthless and disposable for any reason. All life is precious.

TOPIC 3: INFANTICIDE

New York’s new abortion law went way beyond abortion. It
legalized infanticide in the Empire State. It specifically removed a section of
Public Health Law (Section 4164) that required medical attention and basic
civil rights be given to any baby who accidentally survives an abortion.

For what possible reason could the governor and lawmakers
have supported this change in our law? Don’t we owe these born, helpless,
voiceless infants basic medical care and protection? This has nothing to do
with the woman’s right to access abortion (she’s already done that) or with
shutting down abortion clinics (clearly they are still out there). We are
talking about denying care and compassion to a living breathing member of our
human family!

I shudder to ask “what’s next”?

TOPIC 4: NEW YORK IS THE ABORTION DESTINATION

New York’s new “Reproductive Health Act” has made abortion in our state an untouchable “fundamental right.” There are virtually no regulations on abortion in New York, unlike most states, where lawmakers have required things like parental notification for minors’ abortions and placed restrictions on taxpayer funding of abortion. Now late-term abortions are available for practically any reason, and new regulations will be essentially impossible to enact. It is logical to assume that abortion will become a tourism business in New York, with women coming in from other states to destroy their unborn children. While other businesses flee the state, the abortion business will be booming. How sad.

TOPIC 5: NON-DOCTORS

I find it hard to believe, but New York’s new abortion law allows non-doctors to perform abortions. The law removed previous law that had required a “duly licensed physician” to perform abortion. In its place, the new law allows any “health care practitioner” who is “licensed, certified or authorized” and acting within their “scope of practice” to perform an abortion.  This sounds to me like lesser trained and lesser experienced practitioners will be able to perform both early and late-term abortions. Does this include both surgical and non-surgical abortions? I heard lawmakers say they were passing this law for women, but how can this possibly be good for women’s health?

TOPIC 6: DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Moving abortion from the criminal laws to the health laws in
our state has already had at least one horrifying consequence. In February
there were at least two cases of crimes committed against pregnant mothers and
their unborn children, but no charges can be brought for the death of the
innocent infants. In Queens County, a mother was heinously
butchered to death
with a knife, and so was her unborn baby. No
charges can be brought by prosecutors for the death of that baby. In Rockland
County, a man plowed
down a pregnant woman
after an altercation at a convenience store,
resulting in a murder charge for the death of the woman, and no charge for the
death of her baby. That’s because there no longer is an “abortion” crime in New
York.

This is unjust and wrong. It must be made right.

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Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/ten-ten-tips/

Insurance mandate for in vitro fertilization

Published on March 8th, 2019

Memorandum of Opposition

Re: A.2817 Simotas / S.719 Savino
In relation to an insurance mandate for in vitro fertilization

The
above-referenced legislation would require large group health insurance plans
to cover the costs of in vitro fertilization (IVF), gamete and embryo
transfers, and other assisted reproductive technologies.  The New York State Catholic Conference
opposes this legislation, as well as language proposed in the 2019-2020
Executive Budget which would accomplish the same goals.

While
the Catholic Church empathizes with childless married couples yearning for the
joys of parenthood, the Conference holds grave concerns with this insurance
mandate.  These concerns include the
legislation’s a) requirement for funding acts that destroy innocent human
embryos, both inside and outside the womb; b) endorsement of technologies which
promote the manufacture of human beings, contribute to the breakdown of family
relationships, and interfere with the natural act of marital sexual
intercourse; and c) lack of any conscience protection for religious employers
and those with ethical objections to assisted reproductive technologies.

A) Destruction of Human Embryos

Many
of the assisted reproductive technologies available today, including IVF,
routinely involve the creation, freezing, discarding, and systematic
destruction of living human embryos in
order to bring one healthy child to term. Initially, the process requires the
fertilization of numerous eggs in the laboratory in order to be marginally
effective. The embryos not implanted are then either discarded immediately or
frozen for later use; many do not survive the freezing and defrosting
processes. In reality, the majority of embryonic children created by IVF procedures
will eventually end up deceased.

Practitioners
generally choose to transfer greater numbers of embryos than fewer, to increase
the chance that at least one will implant; this increases the likelihood of
multiple gestations. According to the NYS Task Force on Life and the Law
(Assisted Reproductive Technologies, April 1998, page 128), “The use of
fertility drugs and the transfer of multiple embryos into the uterus during IVF
creates a recognized risk that more embryos will implant than can safely be
carried to term. In recent years, practitioners have relied on access to ‘fetal
reduction’ – the destruction of one or more embryos so the remaining ones have
a better chance – to manage these hazardous situations.” Simply put, fetal
reduction is abortion.

The
Catholic Church views the manipulation and destruction of living human embryos
through assisted reproductive technologies as an assault on the dignity and
value of human life. Each human embryo possesses unique DNA, and need only
nutrition and the safe environment of the womb to grow and develop. Living
human embryos must not be used as a means to an end because they are, like all
precious human beings, an end in and of themselves.

B) Concerns with Assisted Reproductive Technologies

The
Catholic Church supports and assists couples in overcoming infertility through
the use of scientifically-based diagnostics, drugs and procedures that assist
marital sexual intercourse in reaching its natural procreative potential. This
type of “restorative reproductive medicine” can diagnose and resolve underlying
fertility issues and treat reproductive disorders in an effective, less
invasive, less costly manner than IVF. Restorative reproductive medicine can
markedly reduce the chances of multiple pregnancies, premature births and
miscarriages, and decrease other potential maternal complications as well.

The
Catholic Church cannot support in vitro fertilization because it separates the
natural sexual act from the conception of a child. A man and a woman supply the raw material for a technician to produce
a child, grow him or her in a nutrient culture, and insert the child into the
mother’s womb. This is done in exchange for many thousands of dollars.

IVF
procedures are an artificial means of reproduction which treat children as
merchandise to be manufactured, bought, and disposed of at will.

It is easy to see how this
mentality can lead to other abuses as well, resulting from the desire to
manufacture the best product most efficiently. Embryos produced in a laboratory
can be pre-screened for genetic defects or a predisposition to certain
diseases, or even for gender and eye color, and thrown away if they fail
quality control.

C) Lack of Conscience Protection

This
legislation contains no conscience protection for religious employers,
religious organizations or closely held for-profit employers with religious
objections to certain assisted reproductive technologies. Our Conference has
consistently and strongly advocated for the inclusion of protections which
would exempt religious institutional employers from paying for such mandates.

Conclusion

Current
law already requires health insurance plans to cover the diagnosis and
treatment of infertility, but does not extend coverage to IVF, gamete and
embryo transfers. Nor does current law extend the coverage mandate to human
cloning, sterilization reversals, and experimental procedures, a policy that
would be maintained under this legislation. For all of the above-mentioned
reasons, we believe New York’s current law draws appropriate lines and we
therefore urge lawmakers to reject A.2817 / S.719.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/insurance-mandate-for-in-vitro-fertilization/

Letter to NYS Senate regarding commercial surrogacy

Published on March 6th, 2019

Printable PDF

 Dear Senator: 

The proposed Executive Budget contains a policy proposal unrelated to the state’s finances which repeals New York’s longstanding prohibition on commercial reproductive surrogacy. The language, misleadingly named the “Child-Parent Security Act,” is included in the Public Protection and General Government Article VII legislation (S.1505-A/A.2005-A), Part QQ, beginning on page 200. We strongly oppose this language and urge that it be excluded from the final 2019-2020 SFY Budget. 

Currently, New York Domestic Relations Law declares surrogacy contracts contrary to public policy, void, and unenforceable. Vendors who assist in arranging such contracts are liable for up to a civil penalty of $10,000 and forfeiture of the fee received in brokering the contract; a second violation constitutes a felony. This policy was signed into law in 1992 by then-Governor Mario M. Cuomo, with broad bipartisan support. 

The language in the Executive Budget would undo this policy and allow contractual profit-making arrangements whereby a woman’s womb will be bought/rented for the purpose of breeding a child for a third party, to whom the infant will be relinquished at birth. 

We strongly urge you to oppose the repeal of New York’s prohibition. 

Reproductive commerce is human exploitation. Commercialization denigrates the dignity of women by degrading pregnancy to a service. In states where surrogacy is permitted, surrogate services are advertised, surrogates are recruited — most often on college campuses, in poor neighborhoods, and on military bases — and operating agencies make large profits. Yet the process of surrogacy entails invasive, often burdensome, medical procedures and serious health risks for women. 

Ironically, multiple embryo pregnancies, which are common in assisted reproductive technologies, have been linked to an increased risk of maternal mortality, something which other parts of the proposed Executive Budget call a “serious public health concern” and seek to address and prevent (see S.1507-A/A.2007-A, Part R, beginning on page 93).  

Women who live in dire poverty do not have genuine freedom of choice in making a decision to carry another’s child. Many egg donors and surrogate “carriers” are economically vulnerable women who are desperate for financial income. In states where surrogacy is permitted, it is estimated that gestational surrogates are paid between $20,000 and $30,000 for “reasonable living expenses,” in addition to medical expenses. Egg donors are typically paid $5,000 to $10,000 for each “donation.” Alarmingly, vulnerable women are sometimes exploited repeatedly for their eggs or their wombs, despite the fact that the long-term health dangers to these women are unknown. 

A human baby is not a consumer product to be bought or sold based on the supply and demand of the economy. We would note that the legislative language offers no protection for children in terms of the intended home in which they will reside. As with adoption placements, should there not be background checks and home inspections prior to a child being relinquished? Why does the legislation contain “eligibility requirements” for the surrogate mother but not for the “intended parents”? 

We believe that the surrogacy policy proposed in the Executive Budget fosters grave violations of human rights and human dignity, and will reap many dangerous consequences. It is not in the best interests of women, children, families or society. 

We urge you to oppose the “Child-Parent Security Act” language in the proposed Executive Budget, as well as the freestanding legislation (S.2071) known by the same name. 

Sincerely, 

Kathleen M. Gallagher
Director of Pro-Life Activities 

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/letter-to-nys-senate-regarding-commercial-surrogacy/

Pot slider

Published on March 6th, 2019

marijuana

In its rush to legalize so-called “recreational” marijuana
usage, we believe that our state’s elected officials are preparing to open a
Pandora’s Box that will have multiple deleterious effects on individuals,
families, and all of society.

While the Governor and some legislators see enhanced revenues for the state’s coffers through a new taxable marijuana industry, we are more concerned with consequences ranging from increased teenage and childhood usage, harmful effects on developing brains, addiction, natural progression to harder drug use, increased impairment-related transportation accidents and deaths, and other potential public health and safety issues.

Of particular concern regarding the movement toward
legalization is the impact on children, and the normalization of usage that
state approval encourages. Proponents argue that usage will be restricted to
age 21 and older but, as we have seen in the alcohol and tobacco industries,
producers of harmful products always find a way to market their products to
children.

Studies appear to show racial and ethnic disparities in
enforcement of marijuana possession, and we take this issue seriously. The
state can and should take appropriate measures to ensure that skin color or zip
code do not result in different outcomes for the same offense, including re-evaluating
the justice of current criminal penalties for low-level possession. At the same
time, we must not simply throw up our hands and legalize a harmful substance in
order to declare the problem of discrimination solved.

The Catholic Church is not prohibitionist but at the same
time we believe the government should not be encouraging destructive behavior,
whether gambling or drug use, to raise revenue. Vice is not an appropriate
economic development engine for a state that prides itself as a national
progressive leader. Our state motto is Excelsior
(ever upward), but policies that exploit addiction instead lead us ever
downward.

We join with our state’s medical, education and law
enforcement communities in urging New York State to reject marijuana
legalization.

The Catholic Conference represents the Bishops of New York
State in public policy matters.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/statement-on-recreational-marijuana-legalization/

Statement on Recreational Marijuana Legalization

Published on March 6th, 2019

marijuana

In its rush to legalize so-called “recreational” marijuana
usage, we believe that our state’s elected officials are preparing to open a
Pandora’s Box that will have multiple deleterious effects on individuals,
families, and all of society.

While the Governor and some legislators see enhanced revenues for the state’s coffers through a new taxable marijuana industry, we are more concerned with consequences ranging from increased teenage and childhood usage, harmful effects on developing brains, addiction, natural progression to harder drug use, increased impairment-related transportation accidents and deaths, and other potential public health and safety issues.

Of particular concern regarding the movement toward
legalization is the impact on children, and the normalization of usage that
state approval encourages. Proponents argue that usage will be restricted to
age 21 and older but, as we have seen in the alcohol and tobacco industries,
producers of harmful products always find a way to market their products to
children.

Studies appear to show racial and ethnic disparities in
enforcement of marijuana possession, and we take this issue seriously. The
state can and should take appropriate measures to ensure that skin color or zip
code do not result in different outcomes for the same offense, including re-evaluating
the justice of current criminal penalties for low-level possession. At the same
time, we must not simply throw up our hands and legalize a harmful substance in
order to declare the problem of discrimination solved.

The Catholic Church is not prohibitionist but at the same
time we believe the government should not be encouraging destructive behavior,
whether gambling or drug use, to raise revenue. Vice is not an appropriate
economic development engine for a state that prides itself as a national
progressive leader. Our state motto is Excelsior
(ever upward), but policies that exploit addiction instead lead us ever
downward.

We join with our state’s medical, education and law
enforcement communities in urging New York State to reject marijuana
legalization.

The Catholic Conference represents the Bishops of New York
State in public policy matters.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/statement-on-recreational-marijuana-legalization/

Substantial Equivalency of Private Schools

Published on March 1st, 2019

The revised substantial equivalency guidelines issued by SED, based in part by the amendment to section 3204 of the education law enacted as part of last year’s state budget, set forth three pathways for determining the substantial equivalency of private schools:

  1. those high schools which register with SED and whose substantial equivalency is reviewed and determined by SED;
  2. the subset of bilingual, extended-day schools to be reviewed by local public school authorities who then advance a recommendation regarding substantial equivalency to the Commissioner for a final determination; and
  3. all other private schools which are to be reviewed by local public school officials resulting in a final vote at a public meeting of a public school board. 

Schools in this third pathway do not
have the benefit of having a determination of their equivalence made by the
Commissioner but rather by a vote of the thousands of the locally-elected
school board members across the state. 
At a minimum, this raises equal protection questions.  Moreover, in the case of religious schools,
sending local school authorities to scrutinize private religious schools would
create excessive governmental entanglement in and an infringement of the
exercise of religion. The very process of sending local school boards to
inspect and evaluate religious schools raises these entanglement concerns,
regardless of the outcome of such scrutiny. 
We maintain that in no case should a local public school board have
authority over whether a private school can operate. While we are accountable
primarily to the parents who choose our schools for their children’s formal
education, any government authority over our schools rests with the NYS Board
of Regents.

Because the religious and independent
school community is so diverse, we believe there ought to be multiple options
in measuring the success of these schools without jeopardizing their
independence and unique missions. 
Indeed, multiple options are essential to preserve religious schools’
free exercise and equal protection rights protected by the United States and
New York constitutions, as well as federal Department of Education rules
concerning equal treatment.

As we communicated to the State Education
Department numerous times in the last year, the NYS Council of Catholic School
Superintendents cannot and will not accept a review and vote on their
operations by a local competitor who can, in effect, invalidate the
Regents-issued absolute charters and SED-approved certificates of incorporation
under which our schools have been authorized to operate.  While we believe the Regents and SED have the
discretionary authority to adopt the changes we are proposing, we nonetheless seek
an amendment to Article 65 of the education law to create various options for
determining substantial equivalency with the final authority being vested
exclusively with the State Education Department and Board of Regents.  We further urge restoration of the $2 million
appropriation to support the State Office of Religious and Independent Schools’
efforts to oversee substantial equivalency provisions.

The NYS Council of Catholic School Superintendents is seeking the following additional options including but are not limited to:

  1. Like registered high schools, schools that are accredited by an accrediting agency approved by the Commissioner would be considered as being substantially equivalent.
  2. Schools or school systems that have an absolute charter issued by the Board of Regents would be considered as being substantially equivalent.
  3. For the significant number of schools that administer standardized tests (including state tests), submit BEDS reports, graduation reports, etc., to SED, the department would utilize such data to make a determination of equivalency, just as SED utilizes such data in evaluating public schools.
  4. Expand the voluntary registration process to include elementary level grades.  Currently, the registration process is available for only high school grades.  Just as is the case for registered high schools, any school that is registered with SED would be considered substantially equivalent.
  5. As a last resort, SED would engage BOCES or another contracted entity to conduct reviews.  The BOCES / entity would submit a recommendation to SED on equivalency for a final determination by the Commissioner and/or Regents.

Catholic Schools have a long and solid
record of academic excellence.  We do not
object to demonstrating our success in meeting and exceeding state standards,
but we maintain that authority to determine whether private schools can operate
in the state rests with the Board of Regents and State Education Department
just as is the case with every other educational institution in the state.  The NYS Board of Regents has granted Absolute
Charters to the state’s Catholic dioceses to operate schools.  Those charters are continually amended by the
Regents as those schools are restructured. 
Catholic schools also operate under Certificates of Incorporation
(educational and/or religious corporations) all of which were approved by the
State Education Department.  No local
political subdivision should have the authority to contravene what is in effect
a state-issued license.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/substantial-equivalency-of-private-schools/

Gestational Surrogacy

Published on February 28th, 2019

Re: A.1071-A Paulin
In relation to Gestational Surrogacy Agreements

Memorandum of Opposition

The above-referenced bill
would undo New York’s longstanding prohibition of compensated surrogate
parenting contracts. It would thereby encourage the buying and selling of
children and the outsourcing of motherhood. The New York State Catholic
Conference opposes this bill.

A.1071-A would legalize
commercial “gestational surrogacy,” which involves a monetary contractual
arrangement whereby a woman who is genetically unrelated to the child, will
bear that child for someone else, with the intent of relinquishing the child at
birth. Human embryos are created in a laboratory through in vitro fertilization
(IVF), using egg and sperm that may or may not be from the intended parents,
then transferred to the uterus of the surrogate mother (or “gestational
carrier,” as this bill calls her).

Currently, New York Domestic
Relations Law declares such surrogacy contracts to be contrary to public
policy, void, and unenforceable. Baby brokers who assist in arranging such
contracts are liable for up to a civil
penalty of $10,000 and forfeiture of the fee received in brokering the
contract; a second violation constitutes a felony. Importantly, this policy was
signed into law in 1992 by then-Governor Mario M. Cuomo, at the unanimous
recommendation of the NYS Task Force on Life and the Law, with bipartisan
legislative support.

In December of 2017 a deeply
divided NYS Task Force on Life and the Law released a new report on surrogacy
entitled “Revisiting
Surrogate Parenting: Analysis and Recommendations for Public Policy on
Gestational Surrogacy.”
Fifteen of the members signed a majority
report recommending a repeal of New York’s ban on commercial gestational
surrogacy and a complex web of regulations governing the practice. In the
report, NYS DOH Commissioner Howard Zucker called surrogacy a “difficult” and
“controversial” issue, and conceded that “there remain concerns about the
well-being of children born through surrogacy, the surrogate and her family,
and intended parents and their family” among most Task Force members. We
respectfully suggest that with so many concerns outstanding, this is not the
time to be experimenting with the lives of women and children.

Seven members of the NYS Task
Force signed a minority report (which begins on page 93 of the Task Force
report) recommending that New York’s ban be maintained. We concur with the
minority and their well-documented report, and urge that you read it in full.
We summarize here the primary harms of surrogacy as detailed in that minority
report.

It treats children as commodities to be manufactured, bought and sold. Children are human beings with inherent rights and dignity, not products to be purchased and sold. As the minority notes in its report: “When a surrogacy contract provides that a lower fee is paid to the surrogate when the child is stillborn than when he or she is born alive, or when it provides that some fees otherwise due are withheld until the surrogate surrenders the child to the intended parents, it is hard for an objective observer to say that all of the payments are for the surrogate’s services during pregnancy” and not for the child.

It intentionally fractures families. Surrogacy encourages the creation of children conceived with the intent to separate them from one or all of their biological parents.

It therefore deliberately divides the genetic, gestational and social relationships of children with their parents.

When any sperm, egg and uterus can be ‘combined’ to ‘make’ a baby, the potential exists for a child to have up to six parents — the male sperm, two female eggs (one for the nuclear DNA, and one for the mitochondrial DNA) the surrogate mom (womb), the intended dad, and the intended mom (or second dad, or second mom).

The arrangement compels an unnatural and unhealthy act: telling a mother not to bond with the baby she bears in her womb. Moreover, it can result in confusion, pain, loss and abandonment felt by donor-conceived children, who may never know their true biological origins or experience the natural parent-child bond. The personal testimonies found at www.anonymousus.org are enlightening in this regard.

It exploits women, particularly poor women. Reproductive commerce is human exploitation. Commercialization denigrates the dignity of women by degrading pregnancy to a service. In states where surrogacy is permitted, surrogate services are advertised, surrogates are recruited — most often on college campuses, in poor neighborhoods, and on military bases — and operating agencies make large profits. The minority members of the New York Task Force on Life and the Law did the math and found that a surrogate mother in a typical pregnancy would be earning far less than New York’s minimum wage per hour.

When a poor woman is bearing a child for a couple who is much better off financially, it is an unequal transaction, and that can easily involve coercion, uninformed consent, and violations of human rights. Surrogacy is not without serious health risks to women. Those who provide the eggs are doused with fertility drugs for superovulation and risk ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, which can be life-threatening. Those who are surrogates must receive multiple injections of synthetic hormones for embryonic implantation, some of which have not been approved by the FDA for fertility use. If the pregnancy is successful, the surrogate then must endure nine months of  challenges and potential health problems, and a battery of prenatal tests that may lead to mandated abortion or “fetal reduction” if too many embryos grow in her uterus.

The European Parliament has asked its member states “to acknowledge the serious problem of surrogacy, which constitutes an exploitation of the female body and her reproductive organs.”

New York State law prohibits donating an organ for profit; why is renting a womb and purchasing the “reproductive product” any different? Those who live in dire poverty do not have genuine “freedom of choice” in making a decision to carry another’s child.

Insufficient evidence of safety. The minority report of the Task Force is meticulous in documenting the scarcity of long-term, large-scale studies of the effects of gestational surrogacy on the children born of the process, the surrogate mothers who carry them, and the siblings of the children born. Measurable evidence, they say, is “scanty, equivocal, sometimes biased, and often anecdotal.” Their bottom line: insufficient evidence means you don’t take the risks.

As outlined in the December
2017 Minority Report of the Task Force, the legalization of gestational
surrogacy contracts will foster grave violations of human rights and human
dignity. We do not believe it to be in the best interests of children, families,
or society, and we strongly urge you to oppose this legislation.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/gestational-surrogacy/

Home Stability Support Programs

Published on February 27th, 2019

Memorandum of Support

Re:  A.1620 Hevesi / S.2375 Krueger
In relation to Home Stability Support Programs

It is unacceptable that the
Empire State has over 150,000 homeless children and another 80,000 families on
the brink of homelessness. Statewide, over 23,000 more people become homeless
than escape homelessness every year.

The existing shelter
allowance is woefully inadequate compared to the actual cost of housing where
two-thirds of public assistance households are living in housing whose rents
significantly exceed their shelter allowances. More than 82,000 households have
rents that are 1.5 times or more than their shelter allowance. Nearly 21,000
households have rents that are 2.5 times their shelter allowances. As a result,
many families are being forced into homelessness at no fault of their own.

The Home Stability Support (HSS) program is a fiscally responsible solution to this problem. The HSS program, as outlined in the above-named legislation, will:

  • Keep families and individuals on public assistance in their homes and out of homeless shelters;
  • Reduce costs to the state and taxpayers by preventing evictions, reducing emergency shelter utilization and reducing costs of other homeless services; and
  • Provide relief to financially strapped counties.

Through the use of a new
Shelter Supplement, which will support between 85 percent and 100 percent of
the fair market rent, families will be able to afford to stay in their homes
and not be forced to live in shelters or on the street. In addition to the
shelter supplement, eligible recipients will also receive home stability
support services to avoid homelessness and achieve long term housing stability.

The New York State Catholic
Conference enthusiastically supports passage of this bill.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/home-stability-support-programs/

Petition slider

The Catholic Action Network (CAN), an arm of the New York State Catholic Conference, gives us all a larger voice in the halls of government. Through our email and social media alerts, CAN reaches tens of thousands of Catholics like you to provide educational updates on the important issues being debated and to provide you with the tools to simplify the process of contacting your elected officials.




Article source: https://www.votervoice.net/NYSCATHOLIC/Petitions/1599/Respond

2019-2020 Education Budget Testimony

Published on February 6th, 2019

Testimony of the New York State Catholic Conference regarding the 2019 – 2020 Elementary and Secondary Education Budget
Presented by James D. Cultrara, Director for Education 
Hearing Room B, Legislative Office Building, Albany, N.Y.

February 6, 2019

Introduction

 A promising future for our children, families, communities and our economy depends on whether our schools are providing a quality education to the state’s children. The state’s Catholic schools continue their tradition, going back for more than 200 years, of providing an outstanding education to thousands of our state’s children, many of whom are not Catholic. Especially in our inner cities, Catholic schools continue to help bring children out of poverty. Parents, however, are finding it increasingly difficult to shoulder the dual burden of taxes to support public schools while paying tuition to support the education of their own children. The decline in enrollment and the resulting closing of Catholic schools over the decades is no surprise. Little attention, however, has been paid to the added cost to taxpayers.

While the Catholic Bishops are continuously forced to make the extraordinarily difficult decisions to close Catholic schools, it must be noted that no Catholic school has closed due to academic failure. This is something that cannot be said about either traditional public or charter schools. Nor have our schools been closed due to lack of desire on the part of parents to enroll their children. The loss of Catholic schools in New York State comes down entirely to the rising costs and the inability of parents to pay the increasing tuition needed to meet those costs. This has been a tragedy for the state, for the parents of those children who are enrolled and those who wish they could be, and for the children themselves.

More than 75 Catholic schools across the state were forced to close in the past seven years and more will be closing this June.  More than 300 have closed in the last 20 years. Most of the displaced students then enroll in the already over-burdened public school system at a far greater cost to taxpayers. The shift of enrollment from private to public schools over the last 20 years has increased the cost to taxpayers by more than $2 billion – each and every year! Unless something meaningful is done to support the education of children in religious and independent schools, this trend will continue to exacerbate the burden on taxpayers. But even more importantly, more and more children will be denied the opportunity to escape poverty and have a brighter future that the remarkable success of Catholic schools offers.

Like many good public schools, Catholic schools have been instrumental in moving hundreds of thousands of children out of poverty, many from immigrant populations and communities of color. It is well known that our Catholic schools serve many non-Catholic families; our reach and service goes well beyond the Catholic community. Our ability to serve poor families and the broader community with a quality education depends on the ability of low-income and minority families to access scholarships. These families are desperate for successful schools, knowing that a quality education for their children is the means to a prosperous future.

But if our schools are to continue being a part of addressing New York’s inequality of resources and opportunities, we must work together to meet the fiscal challenges that threaten their very existence. The good news is that you have the opportunity to do something about it, without hurting any other children or any other schools. All it takes is the political will to act.

Substantial Equivalency Reviews and Determinations: The substantial equivalency guidelines issued by SED, based in part by the amendment to section 3204 of the education law enacted as part of last year’s state budget, require many religious and independent schools in New York State to be reviewed by local public school district staff and a determination, by a vote of the public school board, on whether the private school can operate. In the case of religious schools, sending local school authorities to scrutinize private religious schools would create excessive governmental entanglement in and an infringement of the exercise of religion. The very process of sending local school boards to inspect and evaluate religious schools raises these entanglement concerns, regardless of the outcome of such scrutiny.  We maintain that in no case should a local public school board have authority over whether a private school can operate. While we are accountable primarily to the parents who choose our schools for their children’s formal education, any government authority over our schools rests with the NYS Board of Regents.

Because the religious and independent school community is so diverse, we believe there ought to be multiple options in measuring the success of these schools without jeopardizing their independence and unique missions.  Indeed, multiple options are essential to preserve religious schools’ free exercise and equal protection rights protected by the United States and New York constitutions, as well as federal Department of Education rules concerning equal treatment.

The NYS Council of Catholic School Superintendents cannot and will not accept a review and vote on their operations by a local competitor who can, in effect, invalidate a Regents-issued absolute charter, registration and SED-approved certificate of incorporation.  We seek an amendment to Article 65 of the education law to create various options for determining substantial equivalency with the final authority being vested exclusively with the State Education Department and Board of Regents.  We further urge restoration of the $2 million appropriation to support the State Office of Religious and Independent Schools’ efforts to oversee substantial equivalency provisions.

Funding for Critical Capital Needs: Numerous religious and independent schools face critical facility needs which if unmet threaten their ability to maintain a safe and productive space for students, staff and the broader community. Their needs include major roof repair/replacement, structural repairs/renovations, and boiler repair/replacement, etc. Unlike their public school counterparts, most of these schools are unable to finance these projects without financial assistance. We urge a $200 million appropriation within the 2019-20 State Budget for critical capital projects at religious and independent schools.

Funding for Energy Efficiency Projects:  Advances in energy technologies not only reduce energy usage, thereby helping all utility rate-payers, they also improve the spaces in which we live, work, and learn. While these projects are expensive to initiate, the savings realized in some projects can easily pay for the initial expense in a relatively short period of time. Many of our schools however, unlike their public school counterparts, lack the money to initiate such projects. We urge adoption of a combined energy efficiency grant and loan program of $75 million to provide seed money to initiate energy efficiency projects. Those school communities utilizing the loan portion of the fund would repay their initial grants with the savings they achieve in energy efficiency, thereby allowing the fund to continue to benefit others.

State Office of Religious and Independent Schools (SORIS): The State Office of Religious and Independent Schools within SED has reversed the work backlog and the delay in disbursing program funds benefitting students and teachers in these schools. Additional funds are needed however to support a sufficient number of staff who can more fully oversee and enforce the state and federal programs related to religious and independent schools as well as to carry-out  the “substantial equivalency” reviews for schools across the state. We therefore urge restoration of the original $2 million funding level for SORIS.

Mandated Services Aid / Immunization: The Executive Budget excludes the $7 million needed to reimburse schools in Buffalo, Rochester and New York City for their expenses in complying with the state’s immunization program – first included in the 2017-18 state budget.  These fund must be restored and sufficient funds provided to fully reimburse schools for all current and prior-year mandated costs.  In addition, the law that was approved twice by the legislature and eventually signed into law by Governor Cuomo to reinstate the 40-year old “instructional time” standard for reimbursement has yet to be implemented.  The resulting delay in reimbursement payments will no doubt adversely affect the ability of many schools to meet their payroll, vendor and other critical financial obligations.

Helping Tuition-paying Families: Lawmakers in 30 states have enacted various forms of tuition assistance programs enabling poor and working-class families to choose the educational setting best suited for their children. These programs have helped multiple generations achieve the kind of educational equality and economic opportunity on which New York State prides itself.  And although demand for our schools remains strong, working and middle class families too often cannot afford even the modest tuition that we must charge – and there are long waiting lists for the limited number of scholarships that can be offered. Yet, New York continues to be one of the states denying its own residents these opportunities.

The federal expansion of 529 plans now allow funds to be used for K-12 tuition. 529 plans were enacted in 1996 to help families pay for college by ensuring that the earnings on the funds in the accounts are not subject to federal income tax. Many states, including New York, enhanced the tax benefit, going above and beyond the federal government by changing their state tax laws to allow contributions to 529 accounts to be deductible on state income taxes. However, New York will likely need to change its tax law again to ensure that withdrawals for K-12 tuition are not subject to New York State income tax. If parents are going to take advantage of the federal law and use funds from a 529 account for K-12 tuition, New York State, in effect, will likely penalize taxpayers by requiring them to not only pay back the tax on the amount that was deducted when computing their state income taxes, but they will likely also have to pay state income tax on any earnings. This could more than offset any federal tax advantage they accrued and result in even greater costs to families.

We urge you to ensure that families are not penalized when taking advantage of the expanded federal 529 Plans and that they can obtain the full tax benefits of 529 accounts for K-12 tuition that are and have been available to families for college tuition for 20 years. In addition, as lawmakers in 30 other state have done, we urge you to enact a meaningful tuition assistance program to generate additional scholarships for the children of low- and working-class families to attend a school best suited for them.

Health, Safety, Security:  We are grateful to you and Governor Cuomo for providing $15 million in health, safety and security funds and the flexibility to support an array of activities addressing these needs. However, many critical projects cannot be financed by the limited funds available to each school. We estimate that at least $30 million is needed to meet current funding demands.

STEM:  While the Governor recommends a $5 million increase from $15 million to $20 million to support Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math education in our schools, , reimbursement claims in the first year came in at $91 million. We also estimate that the actual STEM expenses of schools are in the hundreds of millions as STEM education expands around the world.  While we are grateful to the Governor for the recommended increase, we urge additional funds necessary to keep pace with the rapidly growing STEM program costs.

Transportation Services / Funding: Next to their ability to afford tuition, the second most common challenge faced by parents in enrolling their children in religious or independent schools is their ability to have their children transported to school. When parents are denied their choice of a religious or an independent school because transportation services are not available or are unreasonable or are unreliable, the burden on taxpayers increases as more of these children are forced to enroll in public schools. Moreover, disparate school district calendars result in fragmented transportation services. This problem is exacerbated as districts utilize the additional flexibility granted to them in meeting their minimum instructional time requirements. We urge the following: (1) restore 90 percent state reimbursement of school district costs of transporting religious and independent school students; (2) require transportation to be provided by schools with disparate schedules and calendars – and not denied to religious and independent schools when public schools are closed or when they make mid-year calendar changes;

(3) require small city school districts to transport children up to the maximum mileage limit rather than city limits; (4) increase the maximum distance school districts are required to transport children to school from 15 to 25 miles; and (5) appropriate $25 million in transportation services grants directly to religious and independent school organizations which can then purchase needed transportation services from school districts and other providers where transportation gaps exist.

Smart School Bond FundsThe $25 million appropriation intended to address the inequities in the private school share of the Smart Schools Bond Act funds is not sufficient to ensure that each of our schools across the state is receiving an equitable share of the classroom technology to which they are entitled. We urge: 1) the Smart School Review Board to not approve any district plan that does not correctly calculate the private school share; 2) that funding be used to supplement plans already approved wherein the private school share was incorrectly calculated; and 3) that additional funds be appropriated to ensure that all private schools receive the technology to which they are entitled under the Act.

Nursing ServicesAn increasing number of children have acute and chronic health problems that require the daily attention and care of professional school nurses. Yet the shortage of school nurses leaves school employees in the untenable position of having to respond to health emergencies and manage chronic health problems. School administrators and teachers are not health professionals and simply should not be forced to manage and respond to their students’ asthma, diabetes, food allergies and other health conditions. For parents, as well as for the school staff to whom children have been entrusted, there is nothing more important that the health and safety of their children. It is simply unconscionable to put the lives and well-being of children at risk. We urge you to include sufficient funding to ensure that a full-time nurse is available for every public, independent and religious school.

Academic Intervention Services:  Currently only $922,000 is appropriated annually to independent and religious schools to implement the Academic Intervention Services (AIS) regulations promulgated by the Board of Regents, far below the $20 million that is needed. Without adequate funding now, these at-risk children may easily fall behind even more, requiring more expensive academic interventions later. AIS funding should be increased so that, like public schools, our schools are able to provide these services to our children who are most in need.

Teacher Training and Mentoring: The mandated continuing education for certified teachers and school leaders is essential to maintaining high quality academic programs, to meet the growing needs of students, and to keep pace with developments in standards, assessments, technology, and other programs. We urge you to include $10 million for teacher and leader professional development in religious and independent schools.

Professional Development; Article VII language:  The SED and the Commissioner’s Advisory Council for Nonpublic Schools have developed and are implementing a plan to expend approximately $2 million in federal Title IIa and IVa funds, on an annual basis, to support the professional development of our school principals and teachers as well as supporting vital . One part of the plan calls for graduate level courses to be offered through the state’s institutions of higher education. To that end, SED has established a Memorandum of Understanding  (MOU) with the City University of New York and will seek to do so with the State University of New York – both “sister agencies” of SED. We respectfully urge the inclusion of Article VII language in this year’s budget to permit SED to establish a comparable MOU with the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities so that course offerings at New York’s independent colleges are likewise available to nonpublic school principals and teachers.

Learning Technology Grants: The Governor proposes $3.3 million for Learning Technology grants. The limited funding for this valuable program, however, serves only 50 school districts along with their independent and religious school partners. We strongly urge you to increase the appropriation to a level sufficient to enable more needy schools to benefit from this program.

Early Childhood /Pre-Kindergarten Funding: The State Education Department and advocates continue to seek expanded programing and funding for early childhood/Pre-K and the consolidation of the same. While we applaud this effort in general, we urge that any programmatic and funding modifications continue to require and support the inclusion of community-based providers, including religious and independent schools. Doing otherwise would disenfranchise countless families, erode meaningful diversity in the program and result in substantially higher costs.

In Summary:  In order to ensure that all children, regardless of where they attend school, are provided the opportunity to become competitive, responsible and healthy adults in the 21st century, it is vital that sufficient resources and services be provided on an equitable basis for all children.  Education is a common and shared responsibility of each and every one of us– not an obligation of only the “public” schools. We believe lawmakers are responsible for supporting all families they represent regardless of whether their children are educated in traditional public schools, charters, religious and independents, home school, or virtual classrooms.

While we are grateful for the multiple programs and funding streams provided by lawmakers to the benefit of students in religious and independent schools, the fact remains that our schools operate on a dramatically uneven playing field.  Despite the fact that 13 percent of children in New York State attend a religious and independent schools, less than 1 percent of state education spending is devoted to these children. The bulk of the cost of educating these children is shouldered by their families already overburdened with taxes to support the public education system.  Continued and expanded state support of the students in religious and independent schools will benefit virtually every community across the state and will help make New York the truly progressive state it continues to aspire to be.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/02/2019-2020-education-budget-testimony/

Farmworkers slider

Published on February 5th, 2019

Memorandum of Support

Re: S.2837 Ramos / A.2750 Nolan
In relation to the Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act

The Farmworker Fair Labor Practices Act would address a number of the exemptions in New York’s labor, public health and workers compensation laws that currently prevent farmworkers from accessing rights and privileges available to other workers. The New York State Catholic Conference supports this bill and strongly urges its long-overdue enactment by the legislature.

“For years, the Catholic Church has advocated for equal rights and fair treatment for farmworkers,” Timothy Cardinal Dolan, archbishop of New York, has said. “It is a human rights issue.”

Farmworkers are excluded from many of the laws that establish worker protections, including overtime pay, employer contributions to the unemployment and workers’ compensation funds, and public health protections including sanitation and housing standards. In addition to ending these exclusions, this bill would grant them collective bargaining rights and would require that farmworkers be given a 24-hour day of rest in every calendar week which, whenever possible, would coincide with the laborer’s traditional day for religious worship.

In December 1999, legislation was enacted eliminating farmworkers’ exemption from the minimum wage laws. However, in the 20 years since, we have made no additional progress in achieving worker equality for these individuals on whom we depend for the food that we eat.

There is no legitimate reason for treating farmworkers inequitably. They are not seeking special treatment; they simply ask that they no longer be excluded from the same rights and protections enjoyed by the rest of society.

By recognizing the rights of farmworkers and the unique contributions of agriculture, New York can develop policies which bring economic fairness, safety, and dignity to the production of agricultural goods from which we all benefit.

Memorandum de Apoyo

Re:  S.2837 Ramos / A.2750 Nolan
Con relación a la Ley de Prácticas Laborales Justas para los Trabajadores Agrícolas

La Ley de Prácticas Laborales Justas para los Trabajadores Agrícolas abordaría algunas de las exenciones en las leyes laborales, de salud pública y de compensación laboral de Nueva York, que actualmente impiden que los trabajadores agrícolas accedan a los derechos y privilegios disponibles para otros trabajadores. La Conferencia Católica del Estado de Nueva York apoya aeste proyecto de ley e insta encarecidamente a la legislatura, a promulgarlo desde hace mucho tiempo.

“Durante años, la Iglesia Católica ha abogado por la igualdad de derechos y el trato justo para los trabajadores agrícolas”, dijo Timothy Cardinal Dolan, arzobispo de Nueva York. “Es un asunto de derechos humanos”.

Los trabajadores agrícolas están excluidos de muchas de las leyes que establecen protecciones para los trabajadores, incluyendo el pago de horas extra, las contribuciones del empleador al desempleo y los fondos de compensación para trabajadores, y las protecciones de salud pública, incluyendo los estándares de salubridad y vivienda. Además de poner fin a estas exclusiones, este proyecto de ley les otorgaría derechos de negociación colectiva y exigiría que los trabajadores agrícolas tengan un día de descanso de 24 horas en cada semana calendario que coincidiría con el día tradicional para el culto religioso, siempre que sea posible.

En diciembre de 1999, se promulgó una ley que elimina la exención de los trabajadores agrícolas de las leyes de salario mínimo. Sin embargo, en los 20 años posteriores, no hemos logrado ningún progreso adicional en el logro de la igualdad laboral para estas personas de quienes dependemos para los alimentos que comemos.

No hay una razón legítima para tratar a los trabajadores agrícolas de manera desigual. No buscan un trato especial; simplemente piden que ya no sean excluidos de los mismos derechos y protecciones que goza el resto de la sociedad.

Reconociendo los derechos de los trabajadores agrícolas y las aportaciones únicas de la agricultura, Nueva York puede desarrollar políticas que brinden equidad económica, seguridad y dignidad a la producción de productos agrícolas de los cuales todos nos beneficiamos.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/02/farmworkers-fair-labor-practices-act/

Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act

Published on February 5th, 2019

Memorandum of Support

Re: S.2837 Ramos / A.2750 Nolan
In relation to the Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act

The Farmworker Fair Labor Practices Act would address a number of the exemptions in New York’s labor, public health and workers compensation laws that currently prevent farmworkers from accessing rights and privileges available to other workers. The New York State Catholic Conference supports this bill and strongly urges its long-overdue enactment by the legislature.

“For years, the Catholic Church has advocated for equal rights and fair treatment for farmworkers,” Timothy Cardinal Dolan, archbishop of New York, has said. “It is a human rights issue.”

Farmworkers are excluded from many of the laws that establish worker protections, including overtime pay, employer contributions to the unemployment and workers’ compensation funds, and public health protections including sanitation and housing standards. In addition to ending these exclusions, this bill would grant them collective bargaining rights and would require that farmworkers be given a 24-hour day of rest in every calendar week which, whenever possible, would coincide with the laborer’s traditional day for religious worship.

In December 1999, legislation was enacted eliminating farmworkers’ exemption from the minimum wage laws. However, in the 20 years since, we have made no additional progress in achieving worker equality for these individuals on whom we depend for the food that we eat.

There is no legitimate reason for treating farmworkers inequitably. They are not seeking special treatment; they simply ask that they no longer be excluded from the same rights and protections enjoyed by the rest of society.

By recognizing the rights of farmworkers and the unique contributions of agriculture, New York can develop policies which bring economic fairness, safety, and dignity to the production of agricultural goods from which we all benefit.

Memorandum de Apoyo

Re:  S.2837 Ramos / A.2750 Nolan
Con relación a la Ley de Prácticas Laborales Justas para los Trabajadores Agrícolas

La Ley de Prácticas Laborales Justas para los Trabajadores Agrícolas abordaría algunas de las exenciones en las leyes laborales, de salud pública y de compensación laboral de Nueva York, que actualmente impiden que los trabajadores agrícolas accedan a los derechos y privilegios disponibles para otros trabajadores. La Conferencia Católica del Estado de Nueva York apoya aeste proyecto de ley e insta encarecidamente a la legislatura, a promulgarlo desde hace mucho tiempo.

“Durante años, la Iglesia Católica ha abogado por la igualdad de derechos y el trato justo para los trabajadores agrícolas”, dijo Timothy Cardinal Dolan, arzobispo de Nueva York. “Es un asunto de derechos humanos”.

Los trabajadores agrícolas están excluidos de muchas de las leyes que establecen protecciones para los trabajadores, incluyendo el pago de horas extra, las contribuciones del empleador al desempleo y los fondos de compensación para trabajadores, y las protecciones de salud pública, incluyendo los estándares de salubridad y vivienda. Además de poner fin a estas exclusiones, este proyecto de ley les otorgaría derechos de negociación colectiva y exigiría que los trabajadores agrícolas tengan un día de descanso de 24 horas en cada semana calendario que coincidiría con el día tradicional para el culto religioso, siempre que sea posible.

En diciembre de 1999, se promulgó una ley que elimina la exención de los trabajadores agrícolas de las leyes de salario mínimo. Sin embargo, en los 20 años posteriores, no hemos logrado ningún progreso adicional en el logro de la igualdad laboral para estas personas de quienes dependemos para los alimentos que comemos.

No hay una razón legítima para tratar a los trabajadores agrícolas de manera desigual. No buscan un trato especial; simplemente piden que ya no sean excluidos de los mismos derechos y protecciones que goza el resto de la sociedad.

Reconociendo los derechos de los trabajadores agrícolas y las aportaciones únicas de la agricultura, Nueva York puede desarrollar políticas que brinden equidad económica, seguridad y dignidad a la producción de productos agrícolas de los cuales todos nos beneficiamos.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/02/farmworkers-fair-labor-practices-act/

2019-2020 Human Services Budget Testimony

Published on February 5th, 2019

Testimony of the New York State Catholic Conference regarding the 2019 – 2020 Human Services Budget
Submitted by: Michael A. Lawler, Director of Catholic Charities, NYS Catholic Conference
Hearing Room B, Legislative Office Building, Albany, N.Y.

January 24, 2019

Senator Krueger, Assembly Member Weinstein, distinguished members of the Senate and Assembly, Ladies and Gentlemen.

My name is Michael A. Lawler and I am Director of Catholic Charities for the New York State Catholic Conference. I am representing the New York State Council of Catholic Charities Directors, the policy board for Catholic Charities and its programs operating in all 62 counties of this state. I am also on the Advisory Board of the Strong Nonprofits for a Better New York campaign. We are a group of over 400 human services agencies from every region of the state that has come together to work on human service workforce and infrastructure needs.

Our top priority over the past three years has been the human services workforce. The human services sector, broadly defined, is in crisis. Recruitment and retention is a serious problem across the board.

We believe that there are two ways to begin to address this crisis:  fund a cost-of-living-adjustment (COLA) for all human services; and reimburse the entire human services sector for the costs associated with the $15 minimum wage. Unfortunately, the Governor has turned his back on the human services sector in this budget proposal.

A decade ago, a human services COLA was put into law. Upon its immediate passage, it was deferred. This pattern has continued year in and year out. To date, the human services sector has lost nearly $700 million in state funding. This budget proposal, which he calls his “Justice Agenda” continues this trend and withholds $140 million from the human services sector. Again, the Governor is balancing his budget on the backs of the human services sector. Withholding over $800 million from the human services sector is far from Justice!

We all remember the “Fight for $15” campaign. My organization endorsed the Governor’s proposal. The Governor saw this effort as a way to improve wages for many households struggling to make ends meet. Many of these struggling families are our workforce. Eighty percent of the human services workforce are women and approximately 45 percent are people of color.

Beginning in April 2016, when the law was passed, many in the human services sector, mainly health and mental hygiene agencies, were being compensated for the incremental cost of increasing the minimum wage. For whatever reason, agencies providing human services that are not under contract with health and mental hygiene agencies are being left out in the cold.

In FY 2019, the Governor finally recognized us and put $15 million in the enacted budget to reimburse us for minimum wage costs. I want to thank you, the State Legislature, for approving this line item.

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Governor in his Justice Agenda briefing book repeatedly touts the $15 minimum wage and goes out of his way to say that $1.3 billion is in his budget to pay for minimum wage costs for health and mental hygiene workers. The Governor also repeatedly touts his Women’s Agenda, yet he has turned his back on 80 percent of our workforce.

We, in the human services sector, are completely baffled as to why the Governor would not prioritize our workforce in this budget.

I know that each and every one of you reading this testimony believes in the nonprofit sector and the great work we do in your communities. We also know that you support us in our quest to get the COLA and minimum wage reimbursed.

We are asking the Governor to add $150 million to the budget during the 30-day amendment process. I would ask you to add your voices to ours and ask the same thing. After all, $150 million out of $175 billion is a very small amount of funding (0.000857)

Governor Cuomo:  please address this injustice in your Justice Agenda.

Thank you for your service to this state and thank you for supporting the Human Services sector.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/02/2019-2020-human-services-budget-testimony/

HALT slider

Published on January 30th, 2019

Memorandum of Support

RE: A.2500 Aubry / S.1623 Sepulveda
HALT Solitary Confinement Act

The HALT Solitary Confinement Act would limit the time an inmate can spend in segregated confinement, end the segregated confinement of vulnerable people, restrict the criteria that can result in such confinement, improve conditions of confinement, and create more humane and effective alternatives to such confinement. The New York State Catholic Conference strongly supports this legislation.

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture has denounced solitary confinement that exceeds 15 days. Additionally, there are far too many people in isolation, disproportionately people of color. On any given day, there are nearly 3,000 people in isolated confinement in New York State prisons, locked in concrete 6-by-10-foot cells for 23 hours a day.

In 2000, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops announced its opposition to the increasing use of isolation units, and in 2014, Pope Francis stated, one form of torture is … confinement in high security prisons …the lack of sensory stimuli, the total impossibility of communication and the lack of contact with other human beings induce mental and physical suffering such as paranoia, anxiety, depression, weight loss, and significantly increase the suicidal tendency.

Bishop Edward B. Scharfenberger of the Diocese of Albany wrote in an April 9, 2016, op/ed in the Times Union: “Social science has affirmed that solitary confinement works against the purpose of rehabilitation and restorative justice. It also works against the purpose of improving public safety, both inside our prisons and jails and in our communities. For all Americans committed to building a safer, healthier society, we cannot ignore the mental illness, debilitating trauma and recidivism that are the hallmarks of placing inmates in solitary confinement.”

We have supported the February 2015 settlement between the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU) and New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (DOCCS), in which the state agreed to immediately begin to remove pregnant and mentally disabled prisoners from segregation. Unfortunately, there continues to be a significant use of solitary confinement in the state’s prison system and, as Bishop Scharfenberger wrote, “Still, more must be done to end the use of solitary confinement here in the Empire State.” 

We applaud the sponsors, Assembly Member Jeffrion Aubry and Senator Luis Sepulveda, for their persistence in passing this needed reform and we urge its quick passage by the legislature.

 

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/01/halt-solitary-confinement-act/

HALT Solitary Confinement Act

Published on January 30th, 2019

Memorandum of Support

RE: A.2500 Aubry / S.1623 Sepulveda
HALT Solitary Confinement Act

The HALT Solitary Confinement Act would limit the time an inmate can spend in segregated confinement, end the segregated confinement of vulnerable people, restrict the criteria that can result in such confinement, improve conditions of confinement, and create more humane and effective alternatives to such confinement. The New York State Catholic Conference strongly supports this legislation.

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture has denounced solitary confinement that exceeds 15 days. Additionally, there are far too many people in isolation, disproportionately people of color. On any given day, there are nearly 3,000 people in isolated confinement in New York State prisons, locked in concrete 6-by-10-foot cells for 23 hours a day.

In 2000, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops announced its opposition to the increasing use of isolation units, and in 2014, Pope Francis stated, one form of torture is … confinement in high security prisons …the lack of sensory stimuli, the total impossibility of communication and the lack of contact with other human beings induce mental and physical suffering such as paranoia, anxiety, depression, weight loss, and significantly increase the suicidal tendency.

Bishop Edward B. Scharfenberger of the Diocese of Albany wrote in an April 9, 2016, op/ed in the Times Union: “Social science has affirmed that solitary confinement works against the purpose of rehabilitation and restorative justice. It also works against the purpose of improving public safety, both inside our prisons and jails and in our communities. For all Americans committed to building a safer, healthier society, we cannot ignore the mental illness, debilitating trauma and recidivism that are the hallmarks of placing inmates in solitary confinement.”

We have supported the February 2015 settlement between the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU) and New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (DOCCS), in which the state agreed to immediately begin to remove pregnant and mentally disabled prisoners from segregation. Unfortunately, there continues to be a significant use of solitary confinement in the state’s prison system and, as Bishop Scharfenberger wrote, “Still, more must be done to end the use of solitary confinement here in the Empire State.” 

We applaud the sponsors, Assembly Member Jeffrion Aubry and Senator Luis Sepulveda, for their persistence in passing this needed reform and we urge its quick passage by the legislature.

 

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/01/halt-solitary-confinement-act/

Legislative Votes on Abortion Expansion

Published on January 29th, 2019

On January 22, 2019, the solemn anniversary of Roe vs. Wade, both the State Senate and the Assembly voted on and passed the radical “Reproductive Health Act,” numbered S.240. The Governor immediately signed and celebrated the new law. This law goes well beyond Roe in its permissiveness and aggressive promotion of abortion. For a full analysis, go HERE.

To see how every legislator vote go HERE. A “NO” vote is a pro-life vote. A “Yes” vote is a vote for abortion expansion. The Assembly vote is listed first; the Senate vote is second.

Finally, go HERE to send a message to your elected officials about their vote. Our advocacy tool will automatically send your Senator and Assembly Member the correct message based on their vote.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/01/legislative-votes-on-abortion-expansion/

CVA passage slider

Published on January 28th, 2019

We pray that the passage of the Child Victims Act brings some measure of healing to all survivors by offering them a path of recourse and reconciliation. The legislation now recognizes that child sexual abuse is an evil not just limited to one institution, but a tragic societal ill that must be addressed in every place where it exists.

Sadly, we in the Church know all too well the devastating toll of abuse on survivors, their families, and the extended community. Every Catholic diocese in New York has taken important steps to support survivors of child sexual abuse, including the implementation of reconciliation and compensation programs. We are proud that these pioneering programs have not only helped well more than a thousand survivors of clergy abuse in New York, but have also become a model for how to help survivors in other states and in other institutions.

Now, we hope that this same type of survivor-centered approach, that puts the emphasis on healing, is available to all survivors, regardless of when the abuse occurred, or who their abuser was—whether it was a priest, a coach, a teacher, a doctor, or, as is all too common, a family member. We have long called for strengthening the Child Victims Act and will continue to advocate for the elimination of the criminal statute of limitations, compensations programs for those who prefer it to litigation, and mandatory safe environment training for anyone who works with children, as we have implemented in the eight dioceses throughout New York State.

We thank the brave survivors who have told their stories of abuse in every sector of society. Their witness has moved us all. We renew our commitment to combatting the monstrous crime of childhood sexual abuse and helping all survivors find recourse and reconciliation as they heal.

Timothy Cardinal Dolan
Archbishop of New York

Most Rev. Edward B. Scharfenberger
Bishop of Albany

Most Rev. Nicholas DiMarzio
Bishop of Brooklyn

Most Rev. Richard J. Malone
Bishop of Buffalo

Most Rev. Terry R. LaValley
Bishop of Ogdensburg

Most Rev. Salvatore R. Matano
Bishop of Rochester

Most Rev. John O. Barres
Bishop of Rockville Centre

Most Rev. Robert J. Cunningham
Bishop of Syracuse

And the Auxiliary and Retired Bishops of New York State

 

Oramos para que la aprobación de la Ley de Víctimas Infantiles ofrezca cierto grado de sanación a todos los sobrevivientes, ofreciéndoles un camino de apoyo y reconciliación. La legislación ahora reconoce que el abuso sexual infantil es un mal que no solo se limita a una institución, sino también una trágica enfermedad social que se debe abordar en todos los lugares donde exista.

Lamentablemente, nosotros en la Iglesia conocemos muy de cerca el devastador estrago de los abusos contra los sobrevivientes, sus familias y la comunidad extendida. Cada diócesis católica en Nueva York ha tomado medidas importantes para apoyar a los sobrevivientes del abuso sexual infantil, incluyendo la implementación de programas de reconciliación y compensación. Estamos orgullosos de que estos programas pioneros no solo hayan ayudado a más de mil sobrevivientes de abuso por parte del clero en Nueva York, sino que también se hayan convertido en un modelo de cómo ayudar a los sobrevivientes en otros estados y en otras instituciones.

 Ahora, esperamos que este mismo tipo de acercamiento centrado en el sobreviviente, que enfatiza la sanación, esté disponible para todos los sobrevivientes, independientemente de cuándo ocurrió el abuso o quién fue el abusador, ya se trate de un sacerdote, un entrenador, un maestro, un médico o, como es muy común, un familiar. Hace mucho tiempo que pedimos que se fortalezca la Ley de Víctimas Infantiles y continuaremos abogando por la eliminación del estatuto de limitaciones penales, la implementación de programas de compensación para aquellos que los prefieren en vez del litigio legal y la capacitación obligatoria en entornos seguros para cualquier persona que trabaje con niños, como hemos implementado en las ocho diócesis en todo el Estado de Nueva York.

Agradecemos a los valientes sobrevivientes que han contado sus historias de abuso en todos los sectores de la sociedad. Su testimonio nos ha conmovido a todos. Renovamos nuestro compromiso de combatir el crimen monstruoso del abuso sexual infantil y de ayudar a todos los sobrevivientes a obtener apoyo y reconciliación en su proceso de sanación.

Timothy Cardinal Dolan
Arzobispo de New York

Most Rev. Edward B. Scharfenberger
Obispo de Albany

Most Rev. Nicholas DiMarzio
Obispo de Brooklyn

Most Rev. Richard J. Malone
Obispo de Buffalo

Most Rev. Terry R. LaValley
Obispo de Ogdensburg

Most Rev. Salvatore R. Matano
Obispo de Rochester

Most Rev. John O. Barres
Obispo de Rockville Centre

Most Rev. Robert J. Cunningham
Obispo de Syracuse

Y los obispos auxiliares y retirados del Estado de Nueva York

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/01/nys-bishops-statement-on-passage-of-child-victims-act/

NYS Bishops Statement on Passage of Child Victims Act

Published on January 28th, 2019

We pray that the passage of the Child Victims Act brings some measure of healing to all survivors by offering them a path of recourse and reconciliation. The legislation now recognizes that child sexual abuse is an evil not just limited to one institution, but a tragic societal ill that must be addressed in every place where it exists.

Sadly, we in the Church know all too well the devastating toll of abuse on survivors, their families, and the extended community. Every Catholic diocese in New York has taken important steps to support survivors of child sexual abuse, including the implementation of reconciliation and compensation programs. We are proud that these pioneering programs have not only helped well more than a thousand survivors of clergy abuse in New York, but have also become a model for how to help survivors in other states and in other institutions.

Now, we hope that this same type of survivor-centered approach, that puts the emphasis on healing, is available to all survivors, regardless of when the abuse occurred, or who their abuser was—whether it was a priest, a coach, a teacher, a doctor, or, as is all too common, a family member. We have long called for strengthening the Child Victims Act and will continue to advocate for the elimination of the criminal statute of limitations, compensations programs for those who prefer it to litigation, and mandatory safe environment training for anyone who works with children, as we have implemented in the eight dioceses throughout New York State.

We thank the brave survivors who have told their stories of abuse in every sector of society. Their witness has moved us all. We renew our commitment to combatting the monstrous crime of childhood sexual abuse and helping all survivors find recourse and reconciliation as they heal.

Timothy Cardinal Dolan
Archbishop of New York

Most Rev. Edward B. Scharfenberger
Bishop of Albany

Most Rev. Nicholas DiMarzio
Bishop of Brooklyn

Most Rev. Richard J. Malone
Bishop of Buffalo

Most Rev. Terry R. LaValley
Bishop of Ogdensburg

Most Rev. Salvatore R. Matano
Bishop of Rochester

Most Rev. John O. Barres
Bishop of Rockville Centre

Most Rev. Robert J. Cunningham
Bishop of Syracuse

And the Auxiliary and Retired Bishops of New York State

 

Oramos para que la aprobación de la Ley de Víctimas Infantiles ofrezca cierto grado de sanación a todos los sobrevivientes, ofreciéndoles un camino de apoyo y reconciliación. La legislación ahora reconoce que el abuso sexual infantil es un mal que no solo se limita a una institución, sino también una trágica enfermedad social que se debe abordar en todos los lugares donde exista.

Lamentablemente, nosotros en la Iglesia conocemos muy de cerca el devastador estrago de los abusos contra los sobrevivientes, sus familias y la comunidad extendida. Cada diócesis católica en Nueva York ha tomado medidas importantes para apoyar a los sobrevivientes del abuso sexual infantil, incluyendo la implementación de programas de reconciliación y compensación. Estamos orgullosos de que estos programas pioneros no solo hayan ayudado a más de mil sobrevivientes de abuso por parte del clero en Nueva York, sino que también se hayan convertido en un modelo de cómo ayudar a los sobrevivientes en otros estados y en otras instituciones.

 Ahora, esperamos que este mismo tipo de acercamiento centrado en el sobreviviente, que enfatiza la sanación, esté disponible para todos los sobrevivientes, independientemente de cuándo ocurrió el abuso o quién fue el abusador, ya se trate de un sacerdote, un entrenador, un maestro, un médico o, como es muy común, un familiar. Hace mucho tiempo que pedimos que se fortalezca la Ley de Víctimas Infantiles y continuaremos abogando por la eliminación del estatuto de limitaciones penales, la implementación de programas de compensación para aquellos que los prefieren en vez del litigio legal y la capacitación obligatoria en entornos seguros para cualquier persona que trabaje con niños, como hemos implementado en las ocho diócesis en todo el Estado de Nueva York.

Agradecemos a los valientes sobrevivientes que han contado sus historias de abuso en todos los sectores de la sociedad. Su testimonio nos ha conmovido a todos. Renovamos nuestro compromiso de combatir el crimen monstruoso del abuso sexual infantil y de ayudar a todos los sobrevivientes a obtener apoyo y reconciliación en su proceso de sanación.

Timothy Cardinal Dolan
Arzobispo de New York

Most Rev. Edward B. Scharfenberger
Obispo de Albany

Most Rev. Nicholas DiMarzio
Obispo de Brooklyn

Most Rev. Richard J. Malone
Obispo de Buffalo

Most Rev. Terry R. LaValley
Obispo de Ogdensburg

Most Rev. Salvatore R. Matano
Obispo de Rochester

Most Rev. John O. Barres
Obispo de Rockville Centre

Most Rev. Robert J. Cunningham
Obispo de Syracuse

Y los obispos auxiliares y retirados del Estado de Nueva York

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/01/nys-bishops-statement-on-passage-of-child-victims-act/

Statement on Passage of Jose Peralta NYS DREAM Act

Published on January 23rd, 2019

Today’s passage of the Jose Peralta DREAM Act is a strong example of legislation that nurtures real progress, based on respect of human life and the dignity of each person, compassion, service, community and opportunity for everyone.  This legislation will open doors to education that will transform lives and help individuals, families and communities thrive. As we honor and pay tribute to the memory of Senator Jose Peralta, we also pay tribute to the long history of Latino legislators y activists of all backgrounds, who worked tirelessly for many years, so that this day could become a reality.

La aprobación hoy de la Ley José Peralta para Los Soñadores en el Estado de Nueva York, es un sólido ejemplo de legislación que fomenta el progreso real, basada en el respeto a la vida humana y la dignidad de cada persona, la compasión, el servicio, la comunidad y las oportunidades para todos. Esta legislación abrirá puertas a la educación que transformará vidas y ayudará a personas, familias y comunidades a prosperar. Al honrar y rendir homenaje a la memoria del senador José Peralta, también rendimos homenaje a la larga historia de legisladores hispanos y activistas de todos los orígenes, que trabajaron incansablemente durante muchos años para que este día se convierta en una realidad.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/01/statement-on-passage-of-jose-peralta-nys-dream-act/

Statement on passage and signing of abortion expansion legislation

Published on January 22nd, 2019

Following is a statement of the New York State Catholic Conference on the passage and signing of the Reproductive Health Act:

Today, New York State has added a sad chapter to this already solemn date of January 22, the anniversary of Roe v. Wade. With the legislature’s passage, and Governor Cuomo’s signing of the Reproductive Health Act, our beloved state has become a more dangerous one for women and their unborn babies.

Many of the state Senators and Assembly Members who voted for this abortion expansion are mothers themselves, who felt their child toss, turn and kick in their womb, and delighted in the progress of their pregnancy. Many others, as well as our governor, are fathers, who held their partner’s hand as they viewed the ultrasound videos, watched their child squirm and rejoiced at the first sound of a heartbeat. Many of these same officials were themselves born into less-than-perfect conditions – poverty, health problems, disabilities, broken families. All overcame these issues to rise to leadership in our state, because their parents chose life for them.

We thank all of our partners in the 12-year-long fight to stop this horrendous policy, and all pro-life New Yorkers who made their voices heard in an effort to stop it. Let us all pray for the conversion of heart for those who celebrate this tragic moment in the history of our state. And we pray in a special way for the lives that will be lost, and for the women of our state who are made less safe under this law.

The Catholic Conference represents the Bishops of New York State in public policy matters.

Article source: https://www.nyscatholic.org/2019/01/statement-on-passage-and-signing-of-abortion-expansion-legislation/