California

Governor Delivers on Important Vetoes, Respect Life Month

Governor Delivers on Important Vetoes

Last Sunday, at midnight, was the deadline for Governor Jerry Brown to sign or veto a slew of bills.  As traditional, he saved many of the more controversial bills to the very end.

Of the 1,217 bills sent to him this year, the Governor vetoed only 201, or approximately 16 percent.  Hundreds of new bills became law but the CCC is pleased to report that in the final hours before the signing deadline, Governor Brown vetoed two bills that the CCC had opposed.

SB 320 (Leyva, D-Chino) would have mandated that all public universities in the state provide chemical abortion drugs in their on-campus student health centers. The Governor vetoed this bill, refuting the author’s claim that there is limited access to abortion services in California.

You can view all of the Reverence for Life bills followed by the Conference this year at our Legislation page.  You can also review bills in other legislative priority areas.

SB 320 was one of the most significant Reverence for Life bills and has been before the legislature for two years now, a rarity in California’s legislative process.  Thank you to The Legislative Network and all who took the time to write letters and contact legislators to ensure the Catholic voice was heard.

In addition, the Governor vetoed SB 3120 (Gonzales-Fletcher, D-San Diego), which would have ”re-opened” the statute of limitation for civil liability in childhood sexual assault cases. This bill is similar to another he vetoed five years ago which, as cited in Governor Brown’s veto message, failed to include all victims.

The final fate of other bills that the CCC advocated for or against proved mostly successful with a few disappointments.  

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Children Remain Separated from Parents as Migrant Policies Stress “Zero Tolerance”

Last week, more than 1,600 migrant children were quietly moved during the night to a new tent facility in Tornillo Texas.  After a national outcry over the separation of children and parents during the summer, the number of separated children remains high with no remedies in sight.  Dr. Grainne McEvoy, a regular contributor on the history of migration, looks at the ongoing situation:

“Children are not instruments of deterrence but a blessing from God.”

  • Bishop Joe S. Vásquez, Chairman of USCCB Committee on Migration

Last June, the nation’s attention was riveted by a new aspect of the Trump Administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, one which resulted in the separation of more than 2,500 children from parents detained while crossing the southern border. The reports were heart-breaking: separation through subterfuge, children denied human touch or any comfort from supervising adults, and the evidence that at least 100 were under the age of five. The backlash was vociferous and widespread, and, in July, the administration was ultimately forced to walk back this tactic.

Continue Reading

October is Respect Life Month

This month marks the 46th year celebrating Respect Life Month, sponsored by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.  We are called to cherish, defend, and protect those who are most vulnerable, from the beginning of life to its end, and at every point in between.

In a Respect Life Month message, Cardinal Timothy Dolan wrote, “At such a time as this, we become even more aware of the need for messengers of God’s love and instruments of His healing. We realize again, with renewed urgency, our personal call to help others encounter God’s transforming, life-giving love and to defend the sanctity of every person’s life, at every stage and in every circumstance.”

This year’s Respect Life theme is “Every Life: Cherished, Chosen, Sent,” highlighting our call to build a culture of life as missionary disciples. Drawing upon the story of Our Lady of Guadalupe and St. Juan Diego, this theme is briefly unpacked in a short reflection.

There is an abundance of materials and resources available including homily helps, intercessions, flyers, images and much more.

Raising Awareness of Hospice and Palliative Care

All too often, it is only when facing serious and life-threatening illness that people discuss their wishes.  But, it’s at this time that a dizzying array of health care choices materialize, concerns over health predominate every waking moment and worry about family and other concerns can become overwhelming.

Better.  Talk about your wishes ahead of time.  Learn about the options and let your loved ones know your needs.

That’s exactly what World Hospice and Palliate Care Day, October 13, 2018, is all about – raising awareness and understanding of the needs – medical, social, practical, spiritual – of people and their families living with a life-limiting illness.

“Palliative care is an expression of the truly human attitude of taking care of one another, especially of those who suffer,” said Pope Francis to a gathering of health care professionals. “It is a testimony that the human person is always precious, even if marked by illness and old age. Indeed, the person, under any circumstances, is an asset to him/herself and to others and is loved by God.”

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Spotlight on Human Trafficking Bills

It is the unfortunate truth that California is home to a large human trafficking enterprise. With this deplorable practice taking place throughout the state, the CCC is pleased that several bills were signed by Governor Brown that target trafficking.

Two measures supported by the CCC that were signed into law will unite entire school communities with a common awareness of how to identify indicators that children are being groomed for such enslavement and how to prevent it. 

AB 1861 (Rodriquez, D-Pomona) and SB 1104 (Roth, D-Riverside) will provide students and parents together with vital information, training and education on ways to combat this horror of labor and sexual exploitation. 

SB 970 (Atkins, D-San Diego) was also signed by the Governor.  This bill will amend the California Federal Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) to require that specified employers provide at least 20 minutes of training and education to their employees to help recognize human trafficking.

The CCC is hopeful that the next legislative session will bring even more awareness and action to help stop this practice in our state.

October 5, 2018
Vol. 11, No. 30

En Español

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/governor-delivers-important-vetoes-respect-life-month

Gobernador cumple con vetos importantes, Mes de Respeto a la Vida

Gobernador cumple con vetos importantes

El pasado domingo, a la medianoche, se llegó la fecha límite para que el gobernador, Jerry Brown, firmara o vetara una multitud de proyectos de ley. Como es típico, guardó muchos de los proyectos más controversiales hasta el final.

De los 1,217 proyectos de ley que se le enviaron este año, el Gobernador vetó únicamente 201, o aproximadamente el 16 por ciento.  Cientos de nuevos proyectos se convirtieron en ley, pero a la CCC le complace informar que en las últimas horas, antes de que llegara la hora límite para firmar,  el Gobernador Brown vetó dos proyectos a los cuales se oponía la CCC.

SB 320 (Leyva, D-Chino) hubiese mandado que todas las universidades públicas, dentro del estado, proveyeran fármacos para los abortos químicos en los centros de salud ubicados en los recintos universitarios.  El Gobernador vetó este proyecto, refutando la afirmación de la autora de que el acceso a los servicios abortivos es limitado en  California.

Usted puede ver todos los proyectos de ley del Respeto a la Vida seguidos por la Conferencia este año en nuestra página de Legislación .  Usted también puede leer los proyectos de ley en otros campos de prioridad legislativa.

El Proyecto de Ley SB 320 era uno de los proyectos más importantes relacionados al Respeto a la Vida y había estado frente a la Legislatura por dos años ya, algo muy singular que se da en el proceso legislativo en California.  Agradecemos a la Red Legislativa y a todos los que tomaron el tiempo para escribir cartas y comunicarse con los legisladores para asegurarse que se hiciera escuchar la voz católica.  

Adicionalmente, el Gobernador vetó el Proyecto de Ley SB 3120 (Gonzales-Fletcher, D-San Diego), el cual hubiese “vuelto a abrir” la ley de prescripción para la responsabilidad  civil en los casos de agresión sexual infantil. Este proyecto es similar a uno que él vetó hace cinco años, el cual,  como se citó en el mensaje del Gobernador Brown, no incluía a todas las víctimas .

El destino final de otros proyectos de ley que la CCC promovía o combatía, resultó ser, en su mayoría satisfactorio, con unas cuantas decepciones.  

Continúe leyendo

Niños siguen separados de sus padres mientras que las políticas migratorias recalcan “Tolerancia Cero”

Más de 1,600 niños migrantes fueron trasladados sigilosamente, durante la noche, la semana pasada, a un nuevo centro de carpas en Tornillo Texas.  Después de la indignación del público a lo largo del país, debido a la separación de niños y sus padres en el verano, el número de niños separados sigue siendo alto, sin que se vislumbre una solución. La Dra. Grainne McEvoy, una contribuyente regular en torno a la historia de la migración, analiza la situación que continua:

“Los niños no son instrumentos de disuasión, sino una bendición de Dios”.  Obispo Joe S. Vásquez, presidente del Comité de Migración de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los EE.UU.

En el pasado mes de junio,  la atención del país se quedó clavada en un nuevo aspecto de la política migratoria de “tolerancia cero” de la Administración Trump,  la cual resultó en la separación de más de 2,500 niños de sus padres, mientras que cruzaban la frontera sur. Los informes eran desgarradores: la separación mediante el subterfugio, negándole a los niños el toque humano o algún consuelo por parte de los adultos que les supervisaban, y pruebas de que por lo menos 100 niños eran menores de cinco años. Las reacciones fueron enérgicas y amplias, y en julio, la administración se vio finalmente obligada a dejar atrás esta táctica.  

Continúe leyendo

Octubre es el Mes de Respeto a la Vida

Este mes se conmemoran 46 años de celebrar el Mes de Respeto a la Vida, auspiciado por la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los EE.UU. Se nos ha llamado a atesorar, defender y proteger a las personas más vulnerables, desde el principio de la vida hasta el final, y en el intervalo.

En un mensaje del Mes del Respeto a la Vida , el Cardenal Timothy Dolan escribió: “En un momento como este,  nos percatamos aún más de lo necesario que son los mensajeros que comunican el amor de Dios y que son instrumentos de Su sanación. Caemos en cuenta nuevamente,  con una urgencia renovada, de nuestro llamado personal a ayudar a otras personas a encontrar el amor transformador de Dios, que da vida, y a defender la santidad de la vida de cada persona, en cada etapa y en cada circunstancia”. 

El lema de Respeto a la Vida de este año es:  “Toda Vida –  Atesorada, Escogida, Enviada,” Acentuando nuestro llamado a construir una cultura de vida como discípulos misioneros. Inspirándonos en el relato de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y San Juan Diego, se explica brevemente este lema en una breve reflexión.

Hay abundantes materiales y recursos disponibles incluyendo asistencia para las homilías, intercesiones, volantes, imágenes y mucho más.

Crear conciencia sobre los cuidados paliativos y la asistencia a los enfermos incurables

Ocurre con demasiada frecuencia que las personas hablan de sus deseos, únicamente cuando enfrentan alguna enfermedad seria o ven su vida amenazada.  Pero es en ese momento que se materializa una variedad de decisiones vertiginosas sobre la salud, predominan las preocupaciones sobre el bienestar cada momento en que se está despierto, y la preocupación por la familia y otras cosas puede resultar abrumadora.

Por eso es mejor hablar sobre sus deseos por adelantado. Infórmese sobre las opciones que hay disponibles y comparta con sus seres queridos sus necesidades.   

De eso exactamente trata el Día Mundial de Hospicio y de Cuidados Paliativos, celebrado el 13 de octubre de 2018  - para crear conciencia y comprensión respecto a las necesidades – médicas, sociales, prácticas, espirituales – de las personas y familiares que viven con una enfermedad que les limita la vida.  

“Los cuidados paliativos son una expresión de la actitud verdaderamente humana de cuidarnos uno al otro, especialmente cuidando a los que sufren,” dijo el Papa Francisco en una reunión de profesionales de la salud. “Es testimonio de que la persona humana es siempre preciosa, aún si se ve caracterizada por la enfermedad y la edad avanzada. Desde luego, la persona, bajo cualquier circunstancia, es un bien para sí mismo(a) y para otros y es amado(a) por Dios”.  

Continúe leyendo

Poniendo de relieve los proyectos de ley sobre la trata de personas

Es una lamentable verdad que California es sede para una empresa muy grande de la trata de personas.  Ya que esta deplorable práctica se lleva a cabo a lo largo del estado, a la CCC le complace ver que el Gobernador Brown firmó diversos proyectos que abordan la trata de personas.

Dos medidas que gozaban del apoyo de la CCC  y que pasaron a convertirse en ley unirán a comunidades escolares enteras con el conocimiento común de cómo identificar las señales en los niños que están siendo preparados para este tipo de esclavitud y cómo prevenirlo.  

El Proyecto de Ley AB 1861 (Rodriquez, D-Pomona) y el Proyecto de Ley SB 1104 (Roth, D-Riverside) proveerá, conjuntamente, a los estudiantes y a sus padres,  información vital, capacitación y educación sobre las formas en que se puede combatir esta atrocidad de explotación sexual y laboral.   

El Proyecto de Ley SB 970 (Atkins, D-San Diego) también fue firmado por el Gobernador. Este proyecto enmendará la Ley Federal de Empleo y Vivienda en California (California Federal Employment and Housing Act, FEHA) para requerir que ciertos empleadores provean un mínimo de 20 minutos de capacitación y educación a sus empleados para ayudar a reconocer los casos en que hay trata de personas.

La CCC espera que la próxima sesión legislativa brinde una concientización y acción aún mayor para ayudar a eliminar esta práctica en nuestro estado.  

5 de octubre de 2018
Tomo 11, No. 30

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/espanol/gobernador-cumple-con-vetos-importantes-mes-de-respeto-la-vida

Governor Delivers on Important Vetoes

Last Sunday, at midnight, was the deadline for Governor Jerry Brown to sign or veto a slew of bills.  As traditional, he saved many of the more controversial bills to the very end.

Of the 1,217 bills sent to him this year, the Governor vetoed only 201, or approximately 16 percent.  Hundreds of new bills became law but the CCC is pleased to report that in the final hours before the signing deadline, Governor Brown vetoed two bills that the CCC had opposed.

SB 320 (Leyva, D-Chino) would have mandated that all public universities in the state provide chemical abortion drugs in their on-campus student health centers. The Governor vetoed this bill, refuting the author’s claim that there is limited access to abortion services in California.

You can view all of the Reverence for Life bills followed by the Conference this year at our Legislation page.  You can also review bills in other legislative priority areas.

SB 320 was one of the most significant Reverence for Life bills and has been before the legislature for two years now, a rarity in California’s legislative process.  Thank you to The Legislative Network and all who took the time to write letters and contact legislators to ensure the Catholic voice was heard.

In addition, the Governor vetoed SB 3120 (Gonzales-Fletcher, D-San Diego), which would have ”re-opened” the statute of limitation for civil liability in childhood sexual assault cases. This bill is similar to another he vetoed five years ago which, as cited in Governor Brown’s veto message, failed to include all victims.

The final fate of other bills that the CCC advocated for or against proved mostly successful with a few disappointments.  

Restorative Justice - SB 1391 (Lara, D-Bell Gardens), was signed by the Governor. A Catholic Advocacy Day bill, SB 1391 will prohibit youth ages 14 and 15 from entering the adult criminal justice system and instead keep them in the juvenile justice system.

SB 960 (Leyva, D-Chino) was also signed by the Governor. This bill will require California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to submit a report to the legislature in regards to the department’s progress on suicide risk evaluations and 72-hour treatment plans that are designed to reduce risk factors associated with suicide.

SB 1232 (Bradford, D-Compton) was also signed. The bill will provide victims of violent crime more time to apply for compensation.

SB 1437 (Skinner, D-Berkeley), also signed, will restore proportional responsibility in the application of California’s murder statute.  We believe in reserving the harshest punishments for those who intentionally plan or actually commit murder is a better public policy for the state of California.

Education - The number of underprepared teachers working in California’s classrooms has more than doubled in just three years.  As a top education priority, the CCC advocated several measures to strengthen our statewide K-12 teaching force for all students – especially those most in need.

AB 2285 (O’Donnell, D – Long Beach) will recruit more out-of-state teachers in high-demand subjects.  SB 577 (Dodd, D – Napa) will allow community colleges to offer a teacher credentialing programs for those areas with low college-going rates or limited access to teacher credentialing.  Both AB 225 and SB 577 were approved by the Governor.  

It is essential to educate children both at home as well as school to respect the life and dignity of all persons.  The CCC supported the enactment of SB 972 (Portantino, D-La Canada Flintridge) which will require that all student identification cards are imprinted with a suicide hotline.  AB 1868 (Cunningham, R – San Luis Obispo), also enacted, will enable students to be educated in the curriculum under the Healthy Youth Act on the dangers of messaging sexually explicit materials through cell phones, social networking sites, computer networks, or other digital media.

Care for Our Common Home – Pope Francis reminds us that we are an interdependent world, one people, living in a common home. Climate change represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity, with its worst impact felt by our poorest communities and developing countries worldwide in the coming decades.  Signed by the Governor with the CCC’s support SB 100 (de León, D- Los Angeles) will help to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.  This establishes a new state policy that all electricity must come from renewable and zero-carbon resources by 2045. 

Public environmental literacy is vital to address the complex social-ecological crises of our times.  This begins in our state’s K-12 classrooms. Every California student should be educated in Environmental Principles and Concepts (EPCs) as well as an integrated approach to combating poverty, restoring dignity to the excluded, protecting the most vulnerable among us, and at the same time protecting nature. To that end, the CCC supported the approval of SB 720 (Allen, D- Santa Monica) to better integrate EPCs throughout California’s elementary and secondary curriculum across multiple subject areas

Immigration – Unfortunately, AB 638 (Caballero, D-Salinas) could not garner enough votes on the Senate Floor and stopped there.  AB 638 would have made it unlawful for an individual not authorized to practice law in CA to represent others on immigration matters.

However, AB 2887 (Aguiar-Curry, D-Winters) was signed by Governor Brown on deadline day.  AB 2887 will provide additional flexibility to the State’s Office of Migrant Services to better serve the state’s migratory agricultural workers.

The fate of these other Catholic Advocacy Day were determined earlier in the legislative session and previously reported.  AB 2701 (Rubio, D-Baldwin Park) would have created a grant program to provide funding for school-based trauma recovery centers. It failed to pass the Assembly Appropriations Committee, along with AB 2269 (Lackey, R-Palmdale).    AB 2269 would have extended the CalWORKs program for persons receiving aid until he or she reaches the age of 20, if the recipient was attending school and making satisfactory progress toward graduation or completion of a program.  The other Catholic Advocacy Day bills, SB 1214 (Portantino, D- La Canada Flintridge) and AB 1862 (Santiago, D-Los Angeles) both died in committee.   More information on these bills is still available on our Catholic Advocacy Day page.

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/governor-delivers-important-vetoes

CCC Responds to Lawsuit by Jeff Anderson & Associates

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/ccc-responds-lawsuit-jeff-anderson-associates

Children Remain Separated from Parents as Migrant Policies Stress “Zero Tolerance”

Last week more than 1,600 migrant children were quietly moved during the night to a new tent facility in Tornillo Texas.  After a national outcry over the separation of children and parents during the summer, the number of separated children remains high with no remedies in sight.  Dr. Gráinne McEvoy, a regular contributor on the history of migration, looks at the ongoing situation:

“Children are not instruments of deterrence but a blessing from God.” - Bishop Joe S. Vásquez, Chairman of USCCB Committee on Migration

Last June, the nation’s attention was riveted by a new aspect of the Trump Administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, one which resulted in the separation of more than 2,500 children from parents detained while crossing the southern border. The reports were heart-breaking: separation through subterfuge, children denied human touch or any comfort from supervising adults, and the evidence that at least 100 were under the age of five. The backlash was vociferous and widespread, and, in July, the administration was ultimately forced to walk back this tactic.


Gráinne McEvoy is an independent scholar based in South Bend, Indiana, and is currently writing a book on American Catholic social thought and immigration policy in the 20th century.


In recent months, there have been press reports of “missing” children, record levels of minors in detention, and preparations for family detention centers. The details are troubling, but the issues and policies have also been confused and conflated. It is vital that our citizenry take time to understand the practices and proposals at stake in the administration’s treatment of migrant families and children.

Family Separations

In early April, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that federal authorities would adopt a new policy of “zero tolerance” for illegal entry into the United States, particularly along the southwest border. This meant the prosecution of anyone who crossed the border between ports of entry, even those seeking asylum. The decision to ramp up detentions in this way had particular significance for migrant families. Under the terms of a 1997 federal court ruling Flores v. Reno, the government’s ability to keep children in immigration detention is limited, and so the prosecution and detention of parents entails the removal of their children to the custody of a separate federal agency, the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). Pointing to the Flores settlement, the administration repeatedly claimed that it was legally bound to separate detained families, and that, without legislative reform by Congress, its hands were tied. This deliberate obfuscation omitted the fact that previous administrations of both parties, noting serious moral and ethical questions, have generally avoided separation by exempting migrating families from prolonged detention. In both public statements and internal memos, the administration has demonstrated that the separations were a deliberate policy choice, designed to act as a deterrent to future border crossings.

At the end of June, a federal judge issued an injunction ordering the government to reunify families within 30 days, and 14 days for children under five-years-old. It soon became clear that the administration had no plan, nor had they made any advance provision, for reunification. It has only been through cooperation with non-profits and volunteer lawyers that federal authorities have been able to reunite the majority of children with either their parents or another relative. As of mid-September, however, more than 400 children remain in custody. The parents of the majority of this group have already been deported and are proving extremely difficult to locate. The long-term effect of this policy foray on the mental health of thousands of children and their families remains to be seen.    

Detention of Families and Unaccompanied Minors

In early September, in light of its truncated family separation tactic the administration announced a new proposed regulation aimed at family detention. This would effectively eliminate the Flores settlement and enable the authorities to detain families in federal facilities until the conclusion of typically far-off immigration hearings. Policy analysts interpret this proposal as another arrow in the “zero tolerance” quiver, and a second stab at deterring further unauthorized arrivals. A necessary accompaniment to this approach is an expansion of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) family detention capacity, a process which requires congressional authorization.  

It has also come to light that a record number of unaccompanied minors, a five-fold increase over the past year, are being held in federal custody. As of mid-September, approximately 13,300 unaccompanied minors are currently spending an average of 59 days in shelters, foster homes, and, increasingly, “tent cities” run by the Department of Health and Human Services (HSS). Mostly older children fleeing violence and instability in countries like Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, they have arrived at the southern border without a parent or legal guardian, often intending to reunite with a family member in the U.S. The children still separated from their parents since the early summer comprise just a small fraction of the total number.

The reasons for this record level of child detention are complex, but a major factor is the dramatic drop in the rate at which children are discharged into the custody of relatives or sponsors. While it is true that the process for securing sponsor approval has become lengthier and more difficult, critics have pointed to the chilling effect of various Trump administration procedural changes that have discouraged potential sponsors from coming forward to claim their young relatives. These include a new policy of fingerprinting all household members and sharing that information with ICE, a major disincentive when many relatives may themselves be undocumented or at least live in mixed-status homes. Reports also emerged that ICE agents arrested 41 unauthorized immigrants who had come forward to take custody of unaccompanied children.

Holding Law-Makers to Account

It is true that certain aspects of the challenging family migration situation precede the tenure of the current administration and are not of its making. But critics and analysts have raised questions about the legality of current strategies explicitly aimed at “general deterrence” and their efficacy as regards reducing undocumented border crossings. 

For instance, in a statement on the family separations last June, Bishop Joe S. Vásquez, Chairman of the USCCB Committee on Migration, described family unity as “a cornerstone of our American immigration system and a foundational element of Catholic teaching.” The position taken by Church leaders and immigration experts over many decades is the intersection at which these two traditions meet.

Since at least the 1920s, Catholic spokespersons have applied the teachings of Catholic social thought to immigration questions of the day, insisting upon both the right of sovereign nations to control their borders in the national interest, and the right of individuals and families to migrate in order to secure safety and a decent standard of living. When the restrictive immigration laws were enacted in the 1920s, Catholic representatives criticized the ways in which the new regulations resulted in the separation of immigrant men already in the U.S. from their wives and children still abroad. Through debates over Chinese exclusion, discrimination according to national origins, the practice of importing Mexican migrant labor, and refugee admissions, Catholic voices have insisted that the integrity of the family unit is the most important feature of a just, moral immigration policy, and, by extension, of a stable, humane society. Also recognizing the importance of the family unit, from the 1920s, law-makers introduced incremental protections of the migrating family unit. The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 then enshrined the principle of family reunification as a central plank of American immigration law.

It is hard to avoid becoming distracted by the many pressing, high drama flashpoints in our current political life. In the meantime, the administration is detaining children and arresting their family members while simultaneously calling for Congressional action to prevent family separations.  The contradictions are apparent but the solutions are still not in sight.

 

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/family_separation

Raising Awareness of Hospice and Palliative Care

All too often, it is only when facing serious and life-threatening illness that people discuss their wishes.  But, it’s at this time that a dizzying array of health care choices materialize, concerns over health predominate every waking moment and worry about family and other concerns can become overwhelming.

Better.  Talk about your wishes ahead of time.  Learn about the options and let your loved ones know your needs.

That’s exactly what World Hospice and Palliate Care Day, October 13, 2018, is all about – raising awareness and understanding of the needs – medical, social, practical, spiritual – of people and their families living with a life limiting illness.

“Palliative care is an expression of the truly human attitude of taking care of one another, especially of those who suffer,” said Pope Francis to a gathering of health care professionals. “It is a testimony that the human person is always precious, even if marked by illness and old age. Indeed, the person, under any circumstances, is an asset to him/herself and to others and is loved by God.”

Hospice and palliative care are different although many people confuse the two.  Hospice is for people with a terminal illness and who are not expected to live longer than six months, says the Catholic Health Association. The focus is on comfort, not curing an illness.

Palliative case if for people living with serious illness who may also be receiving treatment to cure their illness or prolong their life.  Health care professionals recommend early referrals to palliative care.

Confusion, anxiety and fear of being a burden are common problems that people with serious illnesses encounter.  To addresses this situation, the California Catholic Conference has teamed with the two major Catholic health care providers in California (Dignity Health and Providence/St. Joseph).

The Whole Person Care Initiative will work to ensure that parishioners and patients are loved and well supported during their illness, can openly talk with their spiritual leaders, clinicians, and family members about their wishes at the end of life, and have access to high quality, lower cost palliative care before they suffer needless medical procedures.  (Watch a video.)

As part of the initiative, the California partnership is working with the Catholic Health Association of the United States (CHA) to disseminate the principals and practice of Whole Person Care to other states.  To mark World Hospice and Palliative Care Day and National Hospice and Palliative Care Month (November), CHA and the Supportive Care Coalition (SCC) have developed resources to encourage health care providers and the public to learn more about the benefits of palliative care.

“And even if we know that we cannot always guarantee healing or a cure, we can and must always care for the living, without ourselves shortening their life, but also without futilely resisting their death,” explained Pope Francis.  “This approach is reflected in palliative care, which is proving most important in our culture, as it opposes what makes death most terrifying and unwelcome — pain and loneliness.”

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/palliative-care-hospice-day

Catholic Charities USA Issues Statement on Change to Public Charge Rules

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/public-charge

Perspectivas: Actualización sobre proyectos legislativos; Recursos disponibles para la elección

Brown firma algunos proyectos de ley a la vez que aún se desconoce la suerte de otros

Ya pasaron tres semanas desde que la Legislatura de California levantó su sesión y envió un paquete de más de 1,000 proyectos de ley al Gobernador Jerry Brown para  su firma o veto.

A la Conferencia Católica de California (CCC) le complace informar que el Gobernador ha firmado varios proyectos de ley educativos y del medio ambiente que beneficiarán a todos los californianos, a la vez que seguimos esperando noticias respecto a otros proyectos que podrían tener un impacto devastador.

Se firmó el proyecto AB 2285 (O’Donnell, D-Long Beach), que reclutará a más maestros de fuera del estado para materias de mucha demanda, conjuntamente con el Proyecto SB 972 (Portantino, D-La Cañada Flintridge), el cual requerirá que todas las tarjetas de identidad de estudiantes lleven impreso el número telefónico de una línea de ayuda de emergencia anti suicidios. El Proyecto AB 1868 (Cunningham, R-Condado de San Luis Obispo) permitirá que se instruya a los estudiantes, conforme al Acta de Jóvenes Sanos (Healthy Youth Act) tocante a los peligros de enviar mensajes de contenido sexualmente explicito a través de los medios digitales.

A la CCC le complace que el Gobernador haya también firmado el Proyecto SB 100 (de León, D-Los Ángeles), el cual reducirá de forma cuantificable las emisiones  que dañan nuestro planeta y la salud de nuestras comunidades, especialmente para beneficio de nuestros californianos más vulnerables.

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Caridades Católicas brinda ayuda con tentativas relacionadas al Huracán Florence

Caridades Católicas USA (CCUSA, por sus siglas en inglés) colabora estrechamente con algunas agencias locales en Carolina del Norte, Carolina del Sur y Virginia para brindar ayuda a las comunidades impactadas por el Huracán Florence.

La agencia de CCUSA ha establecido una página de donaciones  y una plataforma para donar a través de mensajes por texto, para así recaudar fondos para esta causa.  Como lo ha hecho en respuesta a los huracanes del año pasado, la agencia CCUSA manda el 100 por ciento de los fondos recaudados a las agencias locales de Caridades Católicas que sirven a las comunidades afectadas.

“Estamos orando por los afectados por la tormenta,” aseguró la Hna. Donna Markham, OP, Ph.D., presidenta y directora general de CCUSA. “Lamentablemente, las personas más impactadas por los desastres naturales son individuos y familias que de por sí ya tenían dificultad para subsistir. Pero, gracias a la generosidad de nuestros donantes,  se cubren las necesidades inmediatas de los más vulnerables y se les apoya para que puedan reconstruir sus vidas”.

Para ofrecer su donativo, envíe mensaje de texto CCUSADISASTER al 71777. También puede usted donar por teléfono llamando al 1-800-919-9338. Pulse aquí para donar en línea.

Para obtener la información más reciente, pulse aquí.

 

Comunicado del Comité Administrativo de la USCCB y medidas que se seguirán en torno a los escándalos por abuso sexual

El Comité Administrativo de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los EEUU (USCCB, por sus siglas en inglés), publicó el siguiente comunicado esta semana, en respuesta a los escándalos por abuso sexual. En su comunicado, los obispos se comprometen a “sanar y proteger con toda la fuerza que Dios nos da”.  

Volverse al Señor

“Cuando cada uno de nosotros recibimos la ordenación como obispos, se nos dijo: ‘Cuiden a todo el rebaño que el Espíritu Santo les ha confiado para pastorear a la Iglesia de Dios’.

Nosotros, el Comité Administrativo de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de EEUU, nos reunimos en Washington en este momento de vergüenza y dolor. 

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Administración recorta número de refugiados permitidos en los EEUU

La Administración anunció esta semana que fijará el número de refugiados permitidos en los Estados Unidos en 30,000 para el año 2019.  Este es el número más bajo que se ha fijado en la historia del programa de ingreso de refugiados a los EEUU,  el cual fue creado formalmente en 1980.

“Ofrecer refugio a los que huyen de la violencia, la tortura o la persecución religiosa es piedra angular de nuestra historia,” afirmó el Mons. Joe S. Vásquez, obispo de Austin, Texas, presidente del Comité de Migración de la Conferencia de Obispos de los EEUU en un comunicado publicado. “Como país, hemos recibido la bendición de contar con grandes recursos que nos brindan la capacidad de acoger de forma segura a los que huyen del peligro. Como pueblo, no cerramos nuestras puertas a las personas que buscan dicha seguridad”. 

El anuncio coincidió con un congreso en Roma sobre “La Xenofobia, el Racismo y el Nacionalismo Populista en el Contexto de la Migración Mundial”.  Esta conferencia realizada del  18 al 20 de septiembre, en Roma, fue auspiciada conjuntamente por el dicasterio del vaticano y el Consejo Mundial de Iglesias con sede en Ginebra en colaboración con el Consejo Pontificio para la Promoción de la Unidad Cristiana.

“Nos duele reconocer que cuando se trata de la migración internacional, prevalecen con demasiada frecuencia la desconfianza y el temor, por encima de la confianza y la apertura hacia el otro,” más sin embargo, a la vez, hay muchos ejemplos de solidaridad y compasión que también se manifiestan, afirmó el Cardenal Peter Turkson, prefecto del Dicasterio para la Promoción del Desarrollo Integral Humano.

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Materiales para la elección ahora disponibles

Las boletas para votantes ausentes empezarán a llegar a los buzones el 8 de octubre, en preparación para la Elección del 6 de noviembre.  La Conferencia Católica de California cuenta con diversos recursos para ayudarle a preparase para emitir su voto. 

Usted podrá encontrar un resumen de todas las  11 proposiciones que figuran en la boleta, incluyendo información de fondo y la doctrina católica que aplica en línea. Hay un grupo de medidas increíblemente diversas para estudiar, incluyendo asuntos fiscales, de vivienda, del agua y del medio ambiente, los hospitales para niños, impuestos y de horario de verano.

Para los que se preguntan sobre el papel de la iglesia, los feligreses y la participación ciudadana, tenemos las preguntas frecuentes para ser ciudadanos fieles -  Faithful Citizenship Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). Analice las guías sobre las cuestiones morales, éticas y teológicas como: ¿Qué es una conciencia bien formada y cómo formo la mía?  También tenemos información disponible para la registración de votantes.

Le recordamos que los Obispos han publicado guías para la promoción, el cabildeo y la acción política –  guidelines for advocacy, lobbying and political action para que las parroquias entiendan mejor el papel de la Iglesia en los asuntos públicos. Revise esta página para contestar las preguntas sobre la participación política y la promoción, en las actividades en su parroquia o aquellas auspiciadas por ésta.

 

Arquidiócesis de SF busca coordinador(a) de Proyecto Raquel

 

21 de septiembre de 2018
Tomo 11, No. 29

En español

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/espanol/perspectivas/perspectivas-actualizaci%C3%B3n-sobre-proyectos-legislativos-recursos-disponibles

Insights: Legislative Bill Update; Election Resources Available

Brown Signs Some Bills While Fate of Others Still Unknown

It has been three weeks since the California Legislature adjourned for the session and sent a stack of more than 1,000 bills to Governor Jerry Brown for his signature or veto.

The California Catholic Conference (CCC) is pleased to report that the Governor has signed several educational and environmental bills that will benefit all Californians, while we continue to await news on others that could have devastating impacts.  

AB 2285 (O’Donnell, D-Long Beach), which will recruit more out-of-state teachers in high-demand subjects was signed along with SB 972 (Portantino, D-La Cañada Flintridge), which will require that all student identification cards are imprinted with an anti-suicide helpline.  AB 1868 (Cunningham, R-San Luis Obispo County) will enable students to be educated under the Healthy Youth Act on the dangers of messaging sexually explicit materials through digital media.

The CCC is pleased that the Governor also signed SB 100 (de León, D-Los Angeles), which will quantifiably reduce the emissions harmful to our planet and the health of our communities, especially for our most vulnerable Californians.

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Catholic Charities Assisting in Hurricane Florence Efforts

Catholic Charities USA (CCUSA) is working closely with local agencies in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia to respond to those impacted by Hurricane Florence.

CCUSA has set up a donation page and text-to-give platform to raise funds for this effort.  As it did in response to last year’s hurricanes, CCUSA forwards 100 percent of funds raised to the local Catholic Charities agencies that serve the affected communities.

“We are praying for those affected by the storm,” said Sister Donna Markham, OP, Ph.D., President and CEO of CCUSA. “Unfortunately, those most impacted by natural disasters are the individuals and families who are already struggling to make ends meet. But thanks to the generosity of our donors the most vulnerable have their immediate needs met and the long-term recovery support they need to rebuild their lives.”

To donate, text CCUSADISASTER to 71777. You may also donate by phone by calling 1-800-919-9338. Click here to donate online.

For the latest information, click here.

 

USCCB Admin Committee Statement and Actions to be Taken on Sex Abuse Scandals

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Administrative Committee issued the following statement this week in response to the recent sex abuse scandals. In the statement, the bishops say they pledge to “heal and protect with every bit of the strength God provides us.”

Turning to the Lord

“When each of us was ordained as a bishop, we were told: ‘Keep watch over the whole flock in which the Holy Spirit has appointed you to shepherd the Church of God.’

We, the Administrative Committee of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, assembled last week in Washington at this time of shame and sorrow. 

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Administration Slashes Number of Refugees Allowed in US

The Administration announced this week that it will set the level of refugees allowed into the United States at 30,000 for 2019.  This is the lowest number set in the history of the U.S. refugee admissions program which was formally created in 1980.

“Offering refuge to those fleeing violence, torture, or religious persecution is a cornerstone of our history,” said Most Reverend Joe S. Vásquez, Bishop of Austin, Texas, Chair of the of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Migration in a released statement. “We as a country are blessed with vast resources making us capable of securely welcoming those fleeing harm. Closing our doors on those seeking such safety is not who we are as a people.”

The announcement coincided with a conference in Rome on “Xenophobia, Racism and Populist Nationalism in the Context of Global Migration.” The gathering Sept. 18-20 in Rome was jointly hosted by the Vatican dicastery and the Geneva-based World Council of Churches in collaboration with the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity.

“It pains us to note that when it comes to international migration, too often mistrust and fear prevail over trust and openness toward the other,” yet at the same time, there are many examples of solidarity and compassion being demonstrated as well, said Cardinal Peter Turkson, prefect of the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development.

 

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Election Resources Now Available

Absentee ballots will start landing in mailboxes on October 8 in advance of Election Day November 6. To help you prepare to vote, the California Catholic Conference has several resources available.

An overview of all of the 11 propositions on the ballot, including background information and applicate Catholic teaching can be found online. There are an incredibly diverse set of measures to research including fiscal issues, housing, water and the environment, children’s hospitals, taxes and daylight savings time

For those wondering about the role of the church, parishioners and civic participation, there is a Faithful Citizenship Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). Examine guidance on moral, ethical and theological questions such as: What is a well-formed conscience and how do I form my own?  There is also voter registration information available.

A reminder that the Bishops have published guidelines for advocacy, lobbying and political action for parishes to better understand the role of the Church in public affairs. Review this page to answer questions on political involvement and advocacy at your parish or church-sponsored function.

 

SF Archdiocese Seeks Project Rachel Coordinator

 

September 21, 2018
Vol. 11, No. 29

En Español

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/insights-legislative-bill-update-election-resources-available

Brown Signs Some Bills While Fate of Others Still Unknown

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/brown-signs-some-bills-while-fate-others-still-unknown

General Election Propositions

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/take-action/general-election-propositions

Proposition 12 – Confinement of Farm Animals

Fiscal Impact:

According to the Legislative Analyst Office (LAO), Proposition 12 would result in a potential decrease in state income tax revenues from farm businesses, likely not more than several million dollars annually.  Proposition 12 would result in state costs of up to $10 million annually to enforce the measure.  In addition, the LAO states that Proposition 12 would likely result in an increase in prices for eggs, pork and veal.

CCC Position:

No position.

Reflections on Church Teaching:

“Then God said: Let us make human beings in our image, after our likeness.  Let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, the birds of the air, the tame animals, all the wild animals, and all creatures that crawl on the earth.”  Genesis 1:26.

“So the Lord God formed out of the ground all the wild animals and all the birds of the air, and he brought them to the man to see what he would call them; whatever the man called each living creature was then its name.  The man gave names to all the tame animals, all the birds of the air, and all the wild animals; but none proved to be a helper suited to the man.”  Genesis 2:19-20.

“Animals are God’s creatures.  He surrounds them with his providential care.  By their mere existence they bless him and give him glory.  Thus men owe them kindness.  We should recall the gentleness with which saints like St. Francis of Assisi or St. Phillip Neri treated animals.”  Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 2416.

“God entrusted animals to the stewardship or those whom he created in his own image.  Hence it is legitimate to use animals for food and clothing.  They may be domesticated to help man in his work and leisure…It is contrary to human dignity to cause animals to suffer or die needlessly.”  Catechism of the Catholic Church, nos. 2417-8.

“Together with our obligation to use the earth’s goods responsibly, we are called to recognize that other living beings have a value of their own in God’s eyes: ‘by their mere existence they bless him and give him glory’ and indeed, ‘the Lord rejoices in all his works’ (Ps 104:31). By virtue of our unique dignity and our gift of intelligence, we are called to respect creation and its inherent laws, for ‘the Lord by wisdom founded the earth’ (Prov 3:19). In our time, the Church does not simply state that other creatures are completely subordinated to the good of human beings, as if they have no worth in themselves and can be treated as we wish.”  Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home, May 2015 (69).

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/proposition-12-%E2%80%93-confinement-farm-animals

Proposition 11 – Private Ambulance Employees and Work Breaks

Fiscal Impact:

According to the Legislative Analyst Office (LAO), Proposition 11 would likely result in a fiscal benefit to local governments (in the form of lower costs and higher revenues), potentially in the tens of millions of dollars each year.

CCC Position:

No position.

Reflections on Church Teaching:

“Just as God ‘rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had done,’ human life has a rhythm of work and rest.  The institution of the Lord’s Day helps everyone enjoy adequate rest and leisure to cultivate their familial, cultural, social, and religious lives.”  Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 2184.

“Business activity must always include the element of gratuitousness. Fair relationships between managers and workers must be respected and demanded by all parties; but at the same time, an enterprise is a community of work in which everyone deserves fraternal respect and appreciation from their superiors, co-workers and subordinates. Respect for the other as brother or sister must also extend to the local community in which the enterprise is physically located, and in a certain sense, all of the enterprise’s legal and economic relationships must be moderated, enveloped in a climate of respect and fraternity.” – Pope Francis, 2017

“Work is a good thing for man-a good thing for his humanity-because through work man not only transforms nature, adapting it to his own needs, but he also achieves fulfilment as a human being and indeed, in a sense, becomes ‘more a human being’.”  Saint Pope John Paul II, Encyclical Letter Laborem Exercens (On Human Work), September 14, 1981.

“Another sector regarding benefits is the sector associated with the right to rest. In the first place this involves a regular weekly rest comprising at least Sunday, and also a longer period of rest, namely the holiday or vacation taken once a year or possibly in several shorter periods during the year.”  Saint Pope John Paul II, Encyclical Letter Laborem Exercens (On Human Work), September 14, 1981.

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/proposition-11-%E2%80%93-private-ambulance-employees-and-work-breaks

Proposition 10 – Local Rent Control Laws

Fiscal Impact:

According to the Legislative Analyst Office (LAO), Proposition 10 would result in a potential net reduction in state and local revenues of tens of millions of dollars per year in the long term.  Depending on actions taken by local governments, revenue losses could be less or considerably more.

CCC Position:

No position.

Reflections on Church Teaching:

“The political community has a duty to honor the family, to assist it, and to ensure especially…the right to private property, to free enterprise, to obtain work and housing, and the right to emigrate.”  Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 2211.

“There must be made available to all men everything necessary for leading a life truly human, such as food, clothing, and shelter…”  Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World (December 26, 1965).

“Profit and capital are not a good over and above the human person; they are at the service of the common good.  When the common good is used only at the service of profit and capital, this has a name: it is called exclusion, and through it the throwaway culture gets stronger and stronger. Throwaway and exclusion.” – Pope Francis, 2017

“I want to be very clear. There is no social or moral justification, no justification whatsoever, for lack of housing. There are many unjust situations, but we know that God is suffering with us, experiencing them at our side. He does not abandon us. Jesus not only wanted to show solidarity with every person.” – Pope Francis, Visit to St. Patrick’s Parish and meeting with the homeless, 2015

 “As preachers of the Gospel, we proclaim the message of Jesus Christ who identifies Himself with the needs of the least of the brethren. The second great commandment is to love our neighbor. We cannot deny the crying needs for decent housing experienced by the least of the brethren in our society. Effective love of neighbor involves concern for his or her living conditions.”  USCCB, The Right to a Decent Home: A Pastoral Response to the Crisis in Housing (November 20, 1975).

The “principle of subsidiarity” must be respected: “A community of a higher order should not interfere with the life of a community of a lower order, taking over its functions.” In case of need it should, rather, support the smaller community and help to coordinate its activity with activities in the rest of society for the sake of the common good. —Pope John Paul II, Centesimus Annus, #48 (1989)

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/proposition-10-%E2%80%93-local-rent-control-laws

Proposition 8 – Kidney Dialysis Clinics

Fiscal Impact:

According to the Legislative Analyst Office (LAO), Proposition 8 would have an overall annual effect on state and local governments ranging from net positive impact in the low tens of millions of dollars to net negative impact in the tens of millions of dollars.  The impact of the measure on clinics and on state and local government finances is uncertain because the impact would depend on future actions of (1) state regulators and courts in interpreting the measure, and (2) clinics in response to the measure.

CCC Position:

No position.

Reflections on Church Teaching:

The “principle of subsidiarity” must be respected: “A community of a higher order should not interfere with the life of a community of a lower order, taking over its functions.” In case of need it should, rather, support the smaller community and help to coordinate its activity with activities in the rest of society for the sake of the common good. —Pope John Paul II, Centesimus Annus, #48 (1989)

“Profit and capital are not a good over and above the human person; they are at the service of the common good.  When the common good is used only at the service of profit and capital, this has a name: it is called exclusion, and through it the throwaway culture gets stronger and stronger. Throwaway and exclusion.” – Pope Francis, 2017

“Life and physical health are precious gifts entrusted to us by God.  We must take reasonable care of them, taking into account the needs of others and the common good.”  Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 2288

”Concern for the health of its citizens requires that society help in the attainment of living conditions that allow them to grow and reach maturity, food and clothing, housing, health care, basic education, employment and social assistance.”  Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 2288.

“We must speak of man’s rights.  Man has the right to live.  He has the right to bodily integrity and to the means necessary for the proper development of life, particularly food, clothing, shelter, medical care, rest, and finally, the necessary social services.”  Saint Pope John XXIII, Pacem in terris, no. 11 (1963).

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/proposition-8-%E2%80%93-kidney-dialysis-clinics

Proposition 7 – Daylight Saving Time

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/proposition-7-%E2%80%93-daylight-saving-time

Proposition 6 – Repeal of Fuel Taxes and Vehicle License Fee Increases

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/proposition-6-%E2%80%93-repeal-fuel-taxes-and-vehicle-license-fee-increases

Proposition 5 – Property Taxes

Fiscal Impact:

According to the Legislative Analyst Office (LAO), schools and other local governments each probably would lose over $100 million in annual property taxes early on, growing to about $1 billion per year.  There would be a similar increase in state costs to backfill school property tax losses.

CCC Position:

No position.

Reflections on Church Teaching:

“It is the duty of citizens to contribute along with the civil authorities to the good of society in a spirit of truth, justice, solidarity, and freedom.  The love and service of one’s country follow from the duty of gratitude and belong to the order of charity. Submission to legitimate authorities and service of the common good require citizens to fulfill their roles in the life of the political community.  Submission to authority and co-responsibility for the common good make it morally obligatory to pay taxes, to exercise the right to vote, and to defend one’s country.”  Catechism of the Catholic Church, nos. 2239-2240.

“There were many ‘discarded’ by society. Today we have invented other ways to care for, to feed, to teach the poor, and some of the seeds of the Bible have blossomed into more effective institutions than those of the past. The rationale for taxes also lies in this solidarity, which is negated by tax avoidance and evasion which, over and above being illegal acts, are acts which deny the basic law of life: mutual care.” – Pope Francis, Address to Participants in the Meeting of the Economy of Communion, 2017

“In a system of taxation based on justice and equity it is fundamental that the burdens be proportioned to the capacity of the people contributing.”  Saint Pope John XXIII, Mater et Magistra , Encyclical of Pope John XXIII on Christianity and Social Progress, May 15, 1961 (132). 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/proposition-5-%E2%80%93-property-taxes

Proposition 4 – Bond Funding for Children’s Hospitals

Overview:

There are currently eight private nonprofit hospitals in California, as well as the children’s program at the five University of California medical centers that are designated as “children’s hospitals.”  In addition, other hospitals in California that are not specifically identified as “children’s hospitals” have wings or centers that specialize in treating children.

A majority of funding for children’s hospitals comes from the federal-state Medicaid program, commercial health insurance coverage, other governmental health care programs, and private donations.  The California Children’s Services (CCS) Program is a state-local health care coverage program that pays for specialized treatment and other services for children with complex chronic health conditions, including many children treated at children’s hospitals.

Proposition 4 is sponsored by the California Children’s Hospital Association and would authorize the state to sell $1.5 billion in general obligation bonds for capital improvement projects at the 13 state children’s hospitals and other public or private nonprofit hospitals that treat children under the CCS program.  Of this total, $1.1 billion would be provided to the eight private nonprofit children’s hospitals.  Another $270 million would be provided to the five UC children’s hospitals.  The remaining $150 million would be made available to other public or private nonprofit hospitals that provide services to children through the CCS program.

Bond proceeds would be used for projects including the “construction, expansion, remodeling, renovation, furnishing, equipping, financing or refinancing of eligible hospitals in the state.”

On two previous occasions, California voters have authorized the state to issue general obligation bonds to pay for capital projects at children’s hospitals.  In 2004, Proposition 61 provided $750 million in bond funding.  In 2008, Proposition 3 provided $980 million in bond funding. Only the 13 hospitals specifically identified as children’s hospitals in state law are eligible to receive funds under these previous measures.  As of May 2018, most of the funding from the previous two measures had been committed to projects, with the remaining funds expected to be fully committed by the end of summer 2018.

A YES vote on Proposition 4 means the state could sell $1.5 billion in general obligation bonds for the construction, expansion, renovation, and equipping of certain hospitals that treat children.

A NO vote on Proposition 4 means the state could not sell such bonds.

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/proposition-4-%E2%80%93-bond-funding-children%E2%80%99s-hospitals

Proposition 3

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/proposition-3-89-billion-bonds-water-and-environmental-projects

Perspectivas: Concluye Sesión Legislativa; Proyectos de Ley vitales esperan su suerte

Informe Legislativo del Final de la Sesión

La sesión legislativa de dos años de duración oficialmente concluyó a la medianoche del 31 de agosto. Se contemplaron más de 200 proyectos de ley en ese último día y cientos más en el transcurso de la semana. Los proyectos que recibieron aprobación en ambas cámaras ahora se encuentran sobre el escritorio del Gobernador, hasta que él firme o vete cada medida.

La CCC vigilará de cerca las acciones que el Gobernador tome, y usted puede esperar ver diversas alertas provenientes de la Red Legislativa Católica con la intención de instar una firma o un veto. El Gobernador tiene 30 días para tomar medidas en torno a cualquier proyecto de ley enviado a él.

 

El respeto a la vida y proyectos de ley sobre la familia

Tristemente, el proyecto SB 320 (Leyva, D-Chino) ahora yace sobre el escritorio del Gob. Brown. Este proyecto SB 320 manda que todas las universidades públicas del estado provean fármacos para los abortos químicos en sus centros de salud estudiantiles, ubicados en los recintos universitarios. La CCC ha luchado contra este proyecto por casi dos años ya, y será vitalmente importante que el Gobernador oiga la voz de los católicos de todas partes, instándole a que lo vete.  

El proyecto de ley AB 2289 (Weber, D-San Diego) establecería una política, a nivel estatal, respecto a la familia y a un permiso por enfermedad para los padres jóvenes: 1) concede un permiso para los estudiantes que son padres de familia o que están por convertirse en padres, por un mínimo de ocho semanas, 2) concede a un(a) estudiante que cría a un hijo(a), cuatro ausencias justificadas cada año escolar, para que atienda a un hijo(a) enfermo(a), y 3) Informa a una estudiante embarazada o estudiante que cría hijos sobre sus opciones y derechos educativos.

En una medida inesperada, pero bien recibida, el autor del proyecto de ley AB 2943 (Low, D-Campbell) retiró su proyecto que hubiese prohibido que los proveedores de cuidados para la salud mental realizaran iniciativas con la intención de cambiar la orientación sexual. El proyecto iba más allá de la intención y propósito original del Acta de Soluciones Legales para el Consumidor (Consumer Legal Remedies Act) y de forma inaceptable disminuía las expresiones protegidas por las Constituciones de California y de los EE.UU.  El Asambleísta Low, prometió colaborar con más grupos para pulir su proyecto en el futuro.

Esté atento(a) a las Alertas de Acción, que vendrán, donde proceda, en torno a estos proyectos de ley.  Vea una lista de todos los proyectos de ley sobre la Vida y la Familia en nuestro sitio web.

 

Proyectos de ley importantes tocante a la educación y el medio ambiente esperan una firma

Esta sesión legislativa vio un gran surtido de proyectos de ley educativos importantes.  El número de maestros con poca preparación que trabajan en los salones de clases en California, ha aumentado más del doble, en solamente tres años.  Como una prioridad educativa primordial, la CCC ha abogado por varias medidas para fortalecer nuestro cuerpo docente de los niveles K-12, a nivel estatal, para todos los estudiantes – especialmente para los más necesitados.

El proyecto de ley AB 2285 (O’Donnell, D-Long Beach) reclutará a más maestros de fuera del estado para las materias de mayor demanda. Este proyecto fue aprobado y firmado y se convirtió en ley anteriormente este año. 

El proyecto de ley SB 577 (Dodd, D-Napa) permitirá que los colegios comunitarios ofrezcan programas para acreditar a maestros para las zonas que tienen bajas tasas de estudiantes en estos colegios o acceso limitado a la acreditación para maestros.  El proyecto AB 2547 (McCarty, D-Sacramento) capacitará y dará asesoría a los educadores principiantes, mediante programas creativos de residencia para maestros, los cuales les prepara para que se queden en la profesión. Estos dos proyectos esperan la firma del Gobernador.

Otro proyecto de ley, el SB 1214 (Portantino, D-La Cañada Flintridge), hubiese proporcionado a los maestros una deducción de $2,500 para las cuotas que ellos pagan de sus propios bolsillos para completar su acreditación. Esta creativa política fiscal tenía la finalidad de potenciar a todos los nuevos maestros que ahora activamente educan a nuestros estudiantes en las escuelas públicas y privadas de nuestro estado – así como a los maestros que quizá no estén enseñando en este momento, pero que regresarán o se unirán a los que están en las aulas en un futuro. Este proyecto fue copatrocinado por la CCC y la Federación de Maestros de California (California Federation of Teachers).  El proyecto SB 1214 fue aprobado  por el comité en pleno del Senado y de la Asamblea  con votación unánime de ambos partidos, pero se refrenó porque no fue incluido en el presupuesto final.  El Senador Portantino solicitará presupuesto para esta medida en la próxima sesión legislativa.

Es esencial educar a los hijos, tanto en casa como en la escuela, a que respeten la vida y la dignidad de toda persona. La CCC apoya el proyecto SB 972 (Portantino, D-La Cañada Flintridge), que requeriría que todas las tarjetas de identidad de los estudiantes lleven impreso el número de teléfono de una línea directa contra el suicidio.  Esto le brindaría a los estudiantes que contemplan el suicidio, y a otros estudiantes que conocen a compañeros de clases que podrían estarlo contemplando, acceso inmediato a asistencia vital necesaria para valorar la vida. El proyecto AB 1868 (Cunningham, R-Templeton) permitirá que los estudiantes sean instruidos respecto al currículo en torno al Acta de Jóvenes Sanos (Healthy Youth Act) sobre los peligros de enviar mensajes con material sexualmente explícito a través de los teléfonos celulares, los sitios de intercambios sociales en la red, las redes de computación, u otros medios digitales.

La trata de personas es una forma de esclavitud moderna.  La CCC apoya dos medidas que unirán a las comunidades escolares enteras con la toma de conciencia común para saber cómo identificar las señales de que se está adiestrando a niños para corromperlos, esclavizarlos, y cómo prevenir esto.   El proyecto AB 1861 (Rodriquez, D-Pomona) y el proyecto SB 1104 (Roth, D-Riverside) brindará, conjuntamente, a los estudiantes y a los padres de familia, información fundamental, capacitación y educación sobre las formas en que se puede combatir el horror de la explotación laboral y sexual. La CCC tiene la esperanza de que el Gobernador firme estos dos proyectos de ley.

El Papa Francisco nos recuerda que vivimos en un mundo interdependiente, que somos un solo pueblo, compartiendo una casa común.  El cambio climatológico representa uno de los principales retos que enfrenta la humanidad,  donde las comunidades más pobres y los países en vía de desarrollo sufrirán sus peores efectos a nivel mundial, en las próximas décadas.  La CCC continúa apoyando el proyecto SB 100 (de León, D-Los Angeles) que puede drásticamente reducir las emisiones de dióxido de carbono. Esto establece una nueva política estatal de que toda electricidad deberá provenir de fuentes renovables y de cero emisiones de carbono para el año 2045.  El proyecto SB 100 disminuiría mensurablemente las emisiones nocivas para nuestro planeta y para la salud de nuestras comunidades, especialmente para nuestros californianos más vulnerables.  La CCC ha brindado su apoyo a este proyecto de ley y desea instar al Gobernador para que lo firme.

Para ver todos los demás proyectos de ley relacionados a la educación y al medio ambiente que la CCC ha seguido, visite las páginas de Educación o Cuidado de nuestra Casa Común del sitio web de la CCC.

 

Financiación para la inmigración pero aún se enfrentan desafíos

El proyecto AB 1862 (Santiago, D-Los Ángeles y Carrillo, D-Los Ángeles) hubiese designado $10 millones para que el Departamento de Servicios Sociales de California (CDSS, por sus siglas en inglés) provea servicios de inmigración a los beneficiarios actuales o previos del programa federal de TPS  (Estatus Temporal Protegido) que el Presidente Trump suspendió a principios de este año. Los fondos fueron incluidos en el presupuesto hace algunos meses, así que el proyecto de ley ya no fue necesario.

La CCC lamenta informar que el proyecto SB 638 (Caballero – D, Salinas) no logró llegar al escritorio del Gobernador. Este proyecto de ley hubiese establecido que es ilegal que una persona represente a otras en asuntos migratorios, a menos que esta persona cuente con la autorización para ejercer como abogado en este estado o tener la autorización para representar a otras personas en los asuntos federales migratorios.

Se han recibido numerosas quejas de personas que se han aprovechado de los inmigrantes con asuntos legales pendientes. Estos “asesores” cometen errores en las solicitudes federales, provocando que las personas sean deportadas, sin ningún recurso para corregir esto. En algunos casos, los asesores piden que se les pague y no brindan los servicios prometidos.

Este proyecto de ley no fue aprobado en el plenario del Senado, obteniendo solamente 13 votos a favor y 17 votos en contra, con la abstención de 10 senadores. La votación en este caso varió y no siguió las líneas de los partidos. En este momento no se sabe si este proyecto se presentará de nuevo en la próxima sesión.  

Para todos los proyectos de ley relacionados a cuestiones migratorias, visite la sección de inmigración  del sitio web de la  CCC.

 

Proyectos de ley sobre la economía y la justicia restaurativa sobre la mesa

California es un destino común para la trata de personas relacionada a los abusos laborales y sexuales debido a su economía tan grande, a las comunidades de inmigrantes que viven aquí y a su ubicación en la frontera.  Hubo varios proyectos este año que lograron llegar al escritorio del Gobernador que continúan creando conciencia sobre este delito tan intolerable.

El proyecto AB 900 (González-Fletcher, D-San Diego) extendería la elegibilidad para las víctimas de la trata de personas para que puedan recibir compensación por sus pérdidas económicas incurridas como resultado directo de haber sido objeto de la trata.  El proyecto AB 2992 (Daly, D-Anaheim) requeriría que los agentes del orden público desarrollen e implementen un curso de capacitación sobre los niños explotados comercialmente y sobre las víctimas de la trata de personas. El proyecto AB 2034 (Kalra, D-San José) requeriría que determinados comercios que operan transporte interurbano de pasajeros por ferrocarril, metro ligero, o estación de autobuses,  provean capacitación a sus nuevos y existentes empleados que pudieran interactuar con víctimas de la trata de personas.

El proyecto SB 970 (Atkins, D-San Diego) enmendaría el Acta de la Equidad en el Empleo y Vivienda (Fair Employment and Housing Act) para requerirle a ciertos empleadores que provean un mínimo de 20 minutos de capacitación y educación respecto a la creación de conciencia en torno a la trata de personas.

En relación a la legislación de la justicia restaurativa, los votantes en California han dado un giro cultural claro y evidente de lo que antes era darle prioridad a la encarcelación por encima de la inversión en la comunidad. La aprobación de la Proposición 47, la Proposición 57 y el proyecto AB 109 demuestra este giro.  La legislatura sigue estableciendo pasos para desligarse de políticas costosas e ineficaces de encarcelación masiva y en vez de eso, invertir en nuestras comunidades. Los siguientes proyectos de ley se encuentran sobre el escritorio del Gobernador, esperando su firma: 

El proyecto SB 1050 (Lara, D-Bell Gardens) proporcionaría servicios fundamentales a las personas absueltas, una vez salen libres, incluyendo acceso a Medi-Cal, CalFresh, programas de capacitación laboral y dinero. Este proyecto de ley también requeriría que el Departamento de Justicia actualice su base de datos inmediatamente para indicar una convicción errónea. El proyecto SB 1393 (Mitchell, D-Los Ángeles) eliminaría el agravante automático de cinco años añadidos a la condena para las personas con condenas previas por un delito mayor serio, lo cual reestablecería la decisión del tribunal a favor de la justicia. El proyecto SB 1437 (Skinner, D-Berkeley) procura reestablecer la responsabilidad proporcionada en la aplicación de la regla para el asesinato en California y reservar los castigos más duros para las personas que intencionalmente han planeado y efectivamente cometido un asesinato.

El proyecto SB 1391 (Lara, D-Bell Gardens) evitaría que los menores de 14 y 15 años de edad ingresen al sistema penal de adultos y los mantendría en el sistema juvenil. La CCC ha apoyado este proyecto firmemente e instará al Gobernador a que tome el importante paso de firmarlo.  Esté atento a la alerta que se enviará para ayudar a que esta importante propuesta se convierta en una realidad.

En cuanto al establecimiento de una economía justa que funcione para todos  y que abarque una gama amplia de asuntos que incluyan la seguridad alimentaria, el empleo, el problema de no tener un techo y la vivienda asequible, así como programas que sirven a los pobres y vulnerables, algunos proyectos apoyados por la CCC, lograron llegar al escritorio del Gobernador y otros fracasaron.  

Lamentablemente, los dos proyectos, el AB 2269 (Lackey, R-Lakeside) y el AB 2701 (Rubio, D-Baldwin Park) murieron en sus comités.  El proyecto AB 2269 hubiese extendido la edad de elegibilidad para  CalWorks a los 20 años para las personas que están en proceso de obtener un título universitario, mientras que el proyecto AB 2701 hubiese requerido que la Junta de Compensación para Víctimas (Victims Compensation Board) administrara un programa para evaluar las solicitudes y otorgar subvenciones a los centros de recuperación del trauma, situados en las escuelas.  El proyecto AB 2269 fue uno de los proyectos que recibió prioridad de la CCC en la Jornada de Promoción y el autor ha prometido que lo presentará de nuevo el próximo año.

Por otra parte, el proyecto AB 1892 (Jones-Sawyer, D-Los Ángeles) extendería los programas de Empleo y Capacitación de CalFresh a un grupo más amplio de beneficiarios de CalFresh. El proyecto AB 1921 (Maienschein, R-San Diego) eliminaría el requisito del día consecutivo para la asistencia temporal en la vivienda y permite que los beneficiarios de CalWORKs utilicen el pago de asistencia para la vivienda permanente para la vivienda compartida. Estos dos proyectos esperan la decisión del Gobernador.

El proyecto SB 982 (Mitchell, D-Los Ángeles) hubiese aumentado la subvención de CalWORKs para prevenir la extrema pobreza en la niñez y añadido un método de ajuste en la inflación para asegurar que las subvenciones respondan a los aumentos en el costo de vida.  Este proyecto de ley fue parcialmente financiado mediante el Acta Presupuestaria para el 2018-19.

Obtenga mayor información sobre estos proyectos de ley, visitando las páginas de la CCC Justicia Restaurativa  y Dignidad Humana  para informarse más sobre estos y otros proyectos de ley relacionados.                                                                                                         

7 de septiembre de 2018
Tomo 11, No. 28

En español

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/espanol/perspectivas/perspectivas-concluye-sesi%C3%B3n-legislativa-proyectos-de-ley-vitales-esperan-su

Insights: Legislative Session Ends; Vital Bills Await Fate

End-of-Session Legislative Report

The two-year legislative session officially ended at midnight on August 31. More than 200 bills were considered on that last day and hundreds more during that week. Those bills that made it past both houses now sit on the Governor’s desk until he either signs or vetoes each measure.

The CCC is closely monitoring the Governor’s actions, and you can expect to see a variety of alerts from the Catholic Legislative Network to urge either a signature or veto. The Governor has 30 days to act on any bill that is sent to him.

 

Reverence for Life, Family Bills

Sadly, SB 320 (Leyva, D-Chino) now sits on Gov. Brown’s desk. SB 320 mandates that all public universities in the state provide chemical abortion drugs in their on-campus student health centers. The CCC has challenged this bill for nearly two years now, and it will be of vital importance that the Governor hears from Catholics far and wide to urge a veto.

AB 2289 (Weber, D-San Diego) would establish a state-wide family and sick leave policy for young parents that: 1) grants parental leave of at least eight weeks to a student who is a parent or is soon to be a parent, 2) grants a parenting student four excused absences per school year to care for a sick child, and 3) notifies a pregnant or parenting student of their educational rights and options.

In an unexpected, but welcomed move, the author of AB 2943 (Low, D-Campbell) pulled his bill that would have prohibited mental health providers from performing sexual-orientation change efforts.  The bill went beyond the original intent and purpose of the Consumer Legal Remedies Act and impermissibly abridged expressions that are protected by the California and U.S. Constitutions.  Assemblyman Low vowed to work with more groups to refine his bill in the future.

Watch for upcoming Action Alerts, where appropriate, on these bills.  View a list of all the Life and Family bills on our website.

 

Important Education and Environmental Bills Await Signature

This legislative session saw an abundance of important education bills. The number of underprepared teachers working in California’s classrooms has more than doubled in just three years.  As a top education priority, the CCC advocated several measures to strengthen our statewide K-12 teaching force for all students – especially those most in need.

AB 2285 (O’Donnell, D-Long Beach) will recruit more out-of-state teachers in high-demand subjects. This was passed and signed into law earlier this year.

SB 577 (Dodd, D-Napa) will allow community colleges to offer teacher credentialing programs for those areas with low college-going rates or limited access to teacher credentialing.  AB 2547 (McCarty, D-Sacramento) will train and mentor beginning educators through creative teacher residency programs that equip them to stay in the profession.  Both of these bills are awaiting signature by the Governor.

Another bill, SB 1214 (Portantino, D-La Canada Flintridge), would have provided teachers with a $2,500 deduction for required fees they pay out of their own pockets to complete their credential.  Such creative tax policy was aimed to empower all new teachers who are now actively educating our state’s public and private school students – as well as those who may not be teaching right now, but will join or return to the classroom in the future.  This bill was co-sponsored by the CCC and the California Federation of Teachers.  SB 1214 passed the full Senate and Assembly policy committee on unanimous, bipartisan votes but was held because it was not included in the final budget.  Senator Portantino will make a budget ask of this measure in the next Legislative Session.

It is essential to educate children both at home as well as at school to respect the life and dignity of all persons.  The CCC supports SB 972 (Portantino, D-La Canada Flintridge), which would require that all student identification cards are imprinted with a suicide hotline.  This will give students contemplating suicide, and other students who know classmates that may be doing so, an immediate access to vital supports necessary to cherish their life.  AB 1868 (Cunningham, R-Templeton) will enable students to be educated in the curriculum under the Healthy Youth Act on the dangers of messaging sexually explicit materials through cell phones, social networking sites, computer networks, or other digital media.

Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery.  The CCC supports two measures that will unite entire school communities with a common awareness of how to identify indicators that children are being groomed for such enslavement and how to prevent it.  AB 1861 (Rodriquez, D-Pomona) and SB 1104 (Roth, D-Riverside) will provide students and parents together with vital information, training and education on ways to combat the horror of labor and sexual exploitation. The CCC is hopeful the Governor will sign both of these bills.

Pope Francis reminds us that we are an interdependent world, one people, living in a common home. Climate change represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity, with its worst impact felt by our poorest communities and developing countries worldwide in the coming decades.  The CCC continues to support SB 100 (de León, D-Los Angeles) that can drastically reduce carbon dioxide emissions.  This establishes a new state policy that all electricity must come from renewable and zero-carbon resources by 2045.  SB 100 would quantifiably reduce the emissions harmful to our planet and the health of our communities, especially for our most vulnerable Californians. The CCC is supporting this bill and looking to urge the Governor to sign it.

To see all other education and environmental bills that the CCC tracked, visit the Education or Care for our Common Home pages of the CCC website.

 

Funding for Immigration but Challenges Remain

AB 1862 (Santiago, D-Los Angeles and Carrillo, D-Los Angeles) would have appropriated $10 million to the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) to provide immigration services to current or former recipients of the federal Temporary Protected Status (TPS) program that President Trump ended earlier this year. The funding was rolled into the budget earlier this year so the bill became unnecessary.

The CCC is disappointed to report that SB 638 (Caballero – D, Salinas) did not reach the Governor’s desk. This bill will would have made it unlawful for a person to represent others in immigration matters unless that person is authorized to practice law in this state or authorized to represent others in federal immigration matters.

There have been numerous complaints of individuals taking advantage of immigrants facing legal matters. These “consultants” are making errors on federal applications, causing deportation without any recourse to correct them. In some cases, they ask for payment and do not deliver services.

This bill failed on the Senate floor, accruing only 13 aye votes and 17 no votes, with 10 senators abstaining. Votes in this case varied and did not follow party lines. It is unknown at this time if the bill will be reintroduced during the next session.

For all immigration-related bills, visit the Immigration section of the CCC’s website.

 

Economic and Restorative Justice Bills on the Table

California is a common destination for both labor and sex trafficking due to its large economy, immigrant communities and the location on the border. There were a number of bills this year that made it to the Governor’s desk that continues to create awareness around this intolerable crime.

AB 900 (Gonzalez-Fletcher, D-San Diego) would expand human trafficking victims’ eligibility to receive compensation for economic losses incurred as a direct result of being trafficked.  AB 2992 (Daly, D-Anaheim) would require peace officers to develop and implement a training course on commercially exploited children and victims of human trafficking.  AB 2034 (Kalra, D-San Jose) would require specified businesses that operate an intercity passenger rail, light rail or bus station, to provide training to new and existing employees who may interact with a victim of human trafficking.

SB 970 (Atkins, D-San Diego) would amend the Fair Employment and Housing Act to require specified employers to provide at least 20 minutes of training and education regarding human trafficking awareness.

Regarding restorative justice legislation, California voters have made a clear and evident cultural shift away from prioritizing incarceration over community investment. The passage of Prop. 47, Prop. 57 and AB 109 demonstrates this shift.  The legislature continues to lay out steps to divest from expensive and ineffective policies of mass incarceration and instead invest in our communities.  The following bills are on the Governor’s desk awaiting his signature:

SB 1050 (Lara, D-Bell Gardens) would provide critical services to exonerated people upon their release, including access to Medi-Cal, CalFresh, work training programs and gate money. This bill would also require the Department of Justice to update their database immediately to reflect a wrongful conviction. SB 1393 (Mitchell, D-Los Angeles) would remove the five-year automatic sentence enhancement for people with prior serious felony conviction, restoring the court’s decision in the interest of justice. SB 1437 (Skinner, D-Berkeley) seeks to restore proportional responsibility in the application of California’s murder rule and reserving the harshest punishments for those who intentionally plan or actually commit murder.

SB 1391 (Lara, D-Bell Gardens) would prevent juveniles ages 14 and 15 years-old from entering the adult criminal system and keep them in the juvenile system. The CCC has strongly supported this bill and will encourage the Governor to take this important step and sign the bill. Keep watch for an alert to help assist in making this important proposal a reality.

As for building a just economy that works for all and encompasses a wide range of issues including food security, work, homelessness and affordable housing, as well as programs that serve the poor and vulnerable people, some CCC supported bills made it to the Governor while others failed.

Unfortunately, both AB 2269 (Lackey, R-Lakeside) and AB 2701 (Rubio, D-Baldwin Park) died in committees. AB 2269 would have expanded the CalWorks age eligibility to 20 for persons working toward a degree, while AB 2701 would have required the Victims Compensation Board to administer a program to evaluate applications and award grants to school-based trauma recovery centers. AB 2269 was one of the CCC priority Advocacy Day bills and the author has vowed to bring it back next year.

Conversely, AB 1892 (Jones-Sawyer, D-Los Angeles) would extend CalFresh Employment and Training programs to a broader group of CalFresh recipients. AB 1921 (Maienschein, R-San Diego) would remove the consecutive day requirement for temporary housing assistance and allow CalWORKs recipients to use permanent housing assistance payment towards shared housing. These are both awaiting action by the Governor.  

SB 982 (Mitchell, D-Los Angeles) would have increased the CalWORKs grant to prevent childhood deep poverty and add an inflation adjustor to ensure grants are responsive to the increases in the cost-of-living.  This bill was partially funded through the 2018-19 Budget Act.

Find out more about these bills by visiting the CCC Restorative Justice and Human Dignity pages to learn more about these and other related bills. 

                                                                                                          

September 7, 2018
Vol. 11, No. 28

En Español

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/insights-legislative-session-ends-vital-bills-await-fate

Economic and Restorative Justice Bills on the Table

California is a common destination for both labor and sex trafficking due to its large economy, immigrant communities and the location on the border. There were a number of bills this year that made it to the Governor’s desk that continues to create awareness around this intolerable crime.

AB 900 (Gonzalez-Fletcher, D-San Diego) would expand human trafficking victims’ eligibility to receive compensation for economic losses incurred as a direct result of being trafficked.  AB 2992 (Daly, D-Anaheim) would require peace officers to develop and implement a training course on commercially exploited children and victims of human trafficking.  AB 2034 (Kalra, D-San Jose) would require specified businesses that operate an intercity passenger rail, light rail or bus station, to provide training to new and existing employees who may interact with a victim of human trafficking.

SB 970 (Atkins, D-San Diego) would amend the Fair Employment and Housing Act to require specified employers to provide at least 20 minutes of training and education regarding human trafficking awareness.

Regarding restorative justice legislation, California voters have made a clear and evident cultural shift away from prioritizing incarceration over community investment. The passage of Prop. 47, Prop. 57 and AB 109 demonstrates this shift.  The legislature continues to lay out steps to divest from expensive and ineffective policies of mass incarceration and instead invest in our communities.  The following bills are on the Governor’s desk awaiting his signature:

SB 1050 (Lara, D-Bell Gardens) would provide critical services to exonerated people upon their release, including access to Medi-Cal, CalFresh, work training programs and gate money. This bill would also require the Department of Justice to update their database immediately to reflect a wrongful conviction. SB 1393 (Mitchell, D-Los Angeles) would remove the five-year automatic sentence enhancement for people with prior serious felony conviction, restoring the court’s decision in the interest of justice. SB 1437 (Skinner, D-Berkeley) seeks to restore proportional responsibility in the application of California’s murder rule and reserving the harshest punishments for those who intentionally plan or actually commit murder.

SB 1391 (Lara, D-Bell Gardens) would prevent juveniles ages 14 and 15 years-old from entering the adult criminal system and keep them in the juvenile system. The CCC has strongly supported this bill and will encourage the Governor to take this important step and sign the bill. Keep watch for an alert to help assist in making this important proposal a reality.

As for building a just economy that works for all and encompasses a wide range of issues including food security, work, homelessness and affordable housing, as well as programs that serve the poor and vulnerable people, some CCC supported bills made it to the Governor while others failed.

Unfortunately, both AB 2269 (Lackey, R-Lakeside) and AB 2701 (Rubio, D-Baldwin Park) died in committees. AB 2269 would have expanded the CalWorks age eligibility to 20 for persons working toward a degree, while AB 2701 would have required the Victims Compensation Board to administer a program to evaluate applications and award grants to school-based trauma recovery centers. AB 2269 was one of the CCC priority Advocacy Day bills and the author has vowed to bring it back next year.

Conversely, AB 1892 (Jones-Sawyer, D-Los Angeles) would extend CalFresh Employment and Training programs to a broader group of CalFresh recipients. AB 1921 (Maienschein, R-San Diego) would remove the consecutive day requirement for temporary housing assistance and allow CalWORKs recipients to use permanent housing assistance payment towards shared housing. These are both awaiting action by the Governor.  

SB 982 (Mitchell, D-Los Angeles) would have increased the CalWORKs grant to prevent childhood deep poverty and add an inflation adjustor to ensure grants are responsive to the increases in the cost-of-living.  This bill was partially funded through the 2018-19 Budget Act.

Find out more about these bills by visiting the CCC Restorative Justice and Human Dignity pages to learn more about these and other related bills. 

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/economic-and-restorative-justice-bills-table

Funding for Immigration but Challenges Remain

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Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/funding-immigration-challenges-remain

Important Education and Environmental Bills Await Signature

This legislative session saw an abundance of important education bills. The number of underprepared teachers working in California’s classrooms has more than doubled in just three years.  As a top education priority, the CCC advocated several measures to strengthen our statewide K-12 teaching force for all students – especially those most in need.

AB 2285 (O’Donnell, D-Long Beach) will recruit more out-of-state teachers in high-demand subjects. This was passed and signed into law earlier this year.

SB 577 (Dodd, D-Napa) will allow community colleges to offer teacher credentialing programs for those areas with low college-going rates or limited access to teacher credentialing.  AB 2547 (McCarty, D-Sacramento) will train and mentor beginning educators through creative teacher residency programs that equip them to stay in the profession.  Both of these bills are awaiting signature by the Governor.

Another bill, SB 1214 (Portantino, D-La Canada Flintridge), would have provided teachers with a $2,500 deduction for required fees they pay out of their own pockets to complete their credential.  Such creative tax policy was aimed to empower all new teachers who are now actively educating our state’s public and private school students – as well as those who may not be teaching right now, but will join or return to the classroom in the future.  This bill was co-sponsored by the CCC and the California Federation of Teachers.  SB 1214 passed the full Senate and Assembly policy committee on unanimous, bipartisan votes but was held because it was not included in the final budget.  Senator Portantino will make a budget ask of this measure in the next Legislative Session.

It is essential to educate children both at home as well as at school to respect the life and dignity of all persons.  The CCC supports SB 972 (Portantino, D-La Canada Flintridge), which would require that all student identification cards are imprinted with a suicide hotline.  This will give students contemplating suicide, and other students who know classmates that may be doing so, an immediate access to vital supports necessary to cherish their life.  AB 1868 (Cunningham, R-Templeton) will enable students to be educated in the curriculum under the Healthy Youth Act on the dangers of messaging sexually explicit materials through cell phones, social networking sites, computer networks, or other digital media.

Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery.  The CCC supports two measures that will unite entire school communities with a common awareness of how to identify indicators that children are being groomed for such enslavement and how to prevent it.  AB 1861 (Rodriquez, D-Pomona) and SB 1104 (Roth, D-Riverside) will provide students and parents together with vital information, training and education on ways to combat the horror of labor and sexual exploitation. The CCC is hopeful the Governor will sign both of these bills.

Pope Francis reminds us that we are an interdependent world, one people, living in a common home. Climate change represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity, with its worst impact felt by our poorest communities and developing countries worldwide in the coming decades.  The CCC continues to support SB 100 (de León, D-Los Angeles) that can drastically reduce carbon dioxide emissions.  This establishes a new state policy that all electricity must come from renewable and zero-carbon resources by 2045.  SB 100 would quantifiably reduce the emissions harmful to our planet and the health of our communities, especially for our most vulnerable Californians. The CCC is supporting this bill and looking to urge the Governor to sign it.

To see all other education and environmental bills that the CCC tracked, visit the Education or Care for our Common Home pages of the CCC website.

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/important-education-and-environmental-bills-await-signature