California

Insights: Chain Migration and Families; Eligibility Changes to SNAP

Chain Migration: Political Representation and Human Reality

In recent years, chain migration has become a contentious concept in debates over immigration to the U.S. Those who support a particular vision for changes to pathways to legal immigration present chain-migration as a form of immigration to the United States that is constantly proliferating, uncontrolled by current laws and, by its size and nature, a threat to the nation’s security, economic stability, and character.

This framing accompanies the White House’s proposals for immigration reform, which aim to limit family-based immigrant visas to the spouses and minor children of citizens and permanent residents, to divert the majority of visas granted annually into a consolidated skills-based “Build America Visa,” and to work towards “ending extended family chain migration.”

Such an understanding of chain migration has been applauded by those who share the Administration’s desire to reduce the level and change the origins of legal immigration.

In response, some voices on the left have called for the term to be purged from general usage, mistakenly identified it as the creation of racially-motivated anti-immigrant hardliners intent upon rolling back the family-sponsored immigration that has been a key reason for the nation’s growing racial diversity since the latter decades of the 20th century. A third voice in this argument, that of social scientists and scholars of migration, points out that since at least the 1960s, “chain migration” has provided a valuable method for understanding and explaining the process by which individuals and families have relocated throughout human history.

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CCC Critical of Proposed Eligibility Changes to SNAP

The California Catholic Conference (CCC) is sending a letter to the USDA critical of the proposed eligibility changes in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or CalFresh in California.

The Trump Administration’s proposed revisions to the program would terminate SNAP eligibility for more than three million people and an estimated 120,000 California households.

The Conference’s letter pointed out that the proposed rule would negatively affect access to necessary food and nutrition assistance while doing little to support access to programs that support self-sufficiency. In California, one in five children live in poverty. The proposed rule change would take away a state option that gives states the flexibility to ensure their most vulnerable children and families have access to food.

Research shows that childhood exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) like living in poverty is associated with adverse experiences well into adulthood. This includes worse health outcomes, low academic achievement and financial stress.  The research highlighting young women and girls, particularly girls and young women of color, are more likely to shoulder the burdens.

The goal of the SNAP program is to decrease food insecurity and hunger by increasing access to food, a healthful diet, and nutrition education for low-wage households. SNAP provides nutrition benefits to supplement the food budget of needy families so they can purchase healthy food and move towards self-sufficiency.

 

Planned Parenthood Withdraws from Title X Funding

Planned Parenthood, the nation’s largest abortion provider, announced this week it is forfeiting federal Title X funds and withdrawing from the program after the implementation of a new rule that will ban funding recipients from providing abortions or referring patients for abortion services.

Planned Parenthood currently receives approximately $60 million from the Title X, a federal family planning program, but receives more than $500 million from Medicaid.

While it claims that the decrease in funding will result in fewer services, Planned Parenthood’s annual reports have shown a steady decrease in the number of clients served each year while government funding has increased for the organization.

Data shows a steady decline in the number of patients over the last decade, while excess revenues for the organization and taxpayer funding have increased by 61 percent, from $336.7 million in 2006 to $543.7 million in 2016.

Planned Parenthood’s abortion numbers have also increased 10 percent over the past ten years, despite seeing about 600,000 fewer patients.

While Planned Parenthood claims it receives only 3 percent of its revenue from abortion services, many have questioned its accounting practices, which separates abortion procedures into discrete categories. Many claim it is likely closer to one-third of its revenue is generated from abortions. The organization has publicly stated contraceptives represent one-third of its revenue. 

 

USCCB Applauds Proposal to Prevent Discrimination Against Faith-Based Contractors

Chairmen of three committees of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) expressed support for proposed regulations from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) clarifying religious protections that may be invoked by federal contractors, including faith-based organizations.

“Faith-based groups should have the opportunity to compete on a level playing field as they seek to partner with the federal government to provide critical social services,” said the Bishops. “These proposed rules protect religious liberty, a core constitutional right, by clarifying existing religious exemptions consistent with federal law and recent Supreme Court precedent. We are grateful to the Administration for taking this step, and we look forward to filing more detailed public comments with OFCCP.”

Visit USCCB for the complete story.

 

Act Now on These Alerts

The end of the legislative session is just around the corner and lawmakers are quickly moving bills through both houses and off the floors. Please take a moment to send emails using these alert links to ensure the Catholic voice is heard in the State Capitol.

In observance of Labor Day, Public Policy Insights will return on September 6.

 

August 23, 2019
Vol. 12, No. 23

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/insights-chain-migration-and-families-eligibility-changes-snap

Planned Parenthood Withdraws from Title X Funding

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Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/planned-parenthood-withdraws-title-x-funding

Chain Migration: Political Representation and Human Reality

In recent years, chain migration has become a contentious concept in debates over immigration to the U.S. Those who support a particular vision for changes to pathways to legal immigration present chain migration as a form of immigration to the United States that is constantly proliferating, uncontrolled by current laws and, by its size and nature, a threat to the nation’s security, economic stability, and character.

This framing accompanies the White House’s proposals for immigration reform, which aim to limit family-based immigrant visas to the spouses and minor children of citizens and permanent residents, to divert the majority of visas granted annually into a consolidated skills-based “Build America Visa,” and to work towards “ending extended family chain migration.”

Such an understanding of chain migration has been applauded by those who share the Administration’s desire to reduce the level and change the origins of legal immigration. In response, some voices on the left have called for the term to be purged from general usage, mistakenly identified it as the creation of racially-motivated anti-immigrant hardliners intent upon rolling back the family-sponsored immigration that has been a key reason for the nation’s growing racial diversity since the latter decades of the 20th century. A third voice in this argument, that of social scientists and scholars of migration, points out that since at least the 1960s, “chain migration” has provided a valuable method for understanding and explaining the process by which individuals and families have relocated throughout human history.


Gráinne McEvoy is an independent scholar based in South Bend, Indiana, and is currently writing a book on American Catholic social thought and immigration policy in the 20th century.


This gap between the political representation and the human reality of chain migration, particularly in how it actually works in the U.S. today, demands that we pay close critical attention to the ways in which the concept has been politicized.

What do we lose when we politicize “chain migration”?

Scholars of migration have called upon academics, policymakers, and the general public to retain chain migration as a valuable method for understanding why and how people migrate. The concept, as explained by historians Arissa Oh and Ellen Wu, “helps us to see the nuances in how ordinary people migrate, while keeping in mind the political and policy context in which they make their decisions.”

Chain migration can help us consider the broad stroke social trends, economic pressures, political upheavals, or religious persecutions that have encouraged the movement of millions of people across generations. At the same time, it allows us to keep an eye on the deeply personal, individual decisions made during conversations around a kitchen table, a break at work, or via letter, phone call or email. It points us toward the importance of remittances (money or other resources sent home by immigrants) in ongoing migratory flows, to the ways in which gender and age have shaped decisions made within family groups, and to the formation and growth of ethnic enclaves and religious communities in new environments.

Chain migration also reminds us of the emotions and humanity at the heart of practical but life-changing decisions made by ordinary people. Migrants might decide whether to move and where to settle on the basis of securing better wages, educational opportunities, or new cultural experiences, forces that can perhaps be measured by economic or data analysis. But, love and friendship can be equally, if not more powerful motivations. It perhaps goes without saying that couples and their children want to live together, but it can also be true that adult siblings want to raise their families in the same neighborhood, and that aging parents want and need to spend their later years near their children and grandchildren. Manipulating the concept of chain migration denies the value and power of these human relationships, and, in the process, squanders its usefulness for the formulation of effective, responsive and, crucially, humane policies around immigration.

Chain Migrants: Our Immigration Past and Present

Last summer, I was part of a team that produced an online project entitled “Immigrant Stories,” published by Experience Magazine. Our goal was to create an interactive experience whereby users would build empathy toward immigrants, past and present. Users are invited to follow in the footsteps of fictional immigrants, make difficult decisions, and experience the challenge of factors beyond their control. All eight immigrants are composites of documented, historical, real life experiences. Although only a portion of the myriad immigrant stories that make up our nation’s history of immigration, the characters were developed to reflect that diverse, complex past. We cast a long chronology from the young Irishwoman Margaret, who arrives in 1853, to Iranian student Hamid, who arrives in 2003. Our four women and four men originate in China, Italy, El Salvador and Ghana, to name a few, arriving in the U.S. as laborers, students, refugees, and undocumented children.

Reflective of the nation’s immigrant past and present, most of the immigrant’s stories involve chain migration:

  • In 1848, Margaret’s parents make the difficult but pragmatic decision to leave their 13-year-old daughter in Ireland as they emigrate to Boston with her younger, more dependent siblings. After acquiring skills as a seamstress and reaching adulthood, Margaret travels to Boston in 1853 to be reunited with her family.
  • After 10 years working in the U.S., Li Wei, a laborer from China, meets and marries Ling during a visit home in 1878. After the introduction of laws prohibiting most Chinese immigration, Li Wei struggles to bring his wife and infant son to live with him in the U.S. resorting, in one version, to smuggling them into the country through Canada.
  • In 2004, Ghanaian nurse Ama, who obtained her immigrant visa through the Diversity Visa lottery in the mid-1990s and became a U.S. citizen in 2002, brings her mother to live with her in the Bronx. As the only child of an elderly widow, could we really expect her to do anything else?

These “Immigrant Stories” reflect that while the nation’s laws have changed over time in ways that can obstruct or facilitate chain migration, migrants will always strive to protect their families, acting out of love, fidelity, and friendship. In order to be effective and humane, immigration law must take these lived realities into account. 

The Need for Honesty

The representation of the current realities of family-based migration is, at best, highly misleading. It exaggerates the number of people who can obtain visas through familial relationships, misrepresents the ease with which such visas can be secured, and distorts the socio-economic impact of the immigration of the parents, siblings and other relatives of new Americans. Readers may familiarize themselves with other perspectives on chain migration by consulting some of the reading suggested below. 

American citizens and residents must pay close attention to calls for change, remaining vigilant and critical of the reasons given for such reforms. Critics of the attempt to end “extended family chain migration” argue that these proposals are a seemingly neutral front for racially-motivated policy objectives, given that, since the latter decades of the 20th century, immigration has been dominated by new arrivals from Asia, Latin America and Africa largely due to the expansion of family-based visa categories. Such smokescreens are not uncommon in the history of U.S. immigration policy. 

An attentive American public deserves and requires transparency and honesty not bogeymen and buzzwords that obscure how migratory patterns work, what existing regulations allow, and how ordinary people – families and communities – make choices within these laws.

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/chain-migration

Perspectivas: La violencia y el racismo aumentan el temor; Proyecto SB 24 sigue siendo una amenaza

Arzobispo Gómez: “La humanidad de otros nunca es negociable”

La violencia y el racismo aumentan el temor pero los Obispos invitan a ser decididos al momento de abordar esos problemas

Los horribles tiroteos masivos en El Paso y Dayton se integraron al debate nacional sobre el racismo la semana pasada, dejando a muchas personas exasperadas pero también fraguando una determinación renovada para combatir los males de la violencia y el racismo en nuestra sociedad.

“Después de El Paso,” escribió el arzobispo de Los Ángeles, Mons. José Gómez, está claro que “debemos ayudar a nuestra sociedad a ver la humanidad que tenemos en común — que todos somos hijos de Dios, destinados a vivir juntos como hermanos y hermanas, sin importar el color de nuestra piel, el idioma que hablamos o el lugar donde nacimos”.

Él también dijo: “Tristemente, el nacionalismo blanco y el terrorismo interno no son nada nuevo”,  mencionando la historia de los campos de internamiento donde se mandaba a los japoneses, la forma en que se linchaba a los mexicanos en Texas, y el bombardeo de iglesias en el “Sur de Jim Crow”(sistema racista de segregación legal).

Los obispos de dos diócesis en California – Mons. Oscar Cantú, Obispo de San José, y Mons. Daniel García, Obispo de Monterey – hicieron un llamado a la acción de forma particularmente rápida tras el tiroteo en El Paso, aparentemente motivado por el racismo.

Las diócesis de ambos fueron afectadas por el tiroteo de julio en un festival de comida en Gilroy, un pueblo ubicado cerca de los límites territoriales de las dos diócesis.  Ambos (al igual que el Arzobispo Gómez) también sirvieron en diócesis de Texas antes de mudarse a California.

Continúe leyendo

 

Reforma a la inmigración legal – por la puerta trasera

(Este artículo fue publicado originalmente el año pasado cuando se propuso un proyecto de normas.  La norma de “carga pública” anunciada esta semana entrará en vigor el 15 de octubre de 2019.  Para un análisis exhaustivo de la norma definitiva, visite el sitio — public charge page de la Red Católica para la Inmigración Legal (Legal Catholic Legal Immigration Network.)

El mes pasado, la Administración Trump anunció un cambio dramático a las tradicionales definiciones de lo que constituye una “carga pública” para los fines de la inmigración legal.  El Obispo Vásquez, presidente del comité de migración de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los EE.UU. afirmó que si se aprueba este cambio, se “debilitarían décadas de políticas y directrices administrativas sobre el trato que se les brinda a los inmigrantes… es probable que éste impida a las familias el acceso a importantes servicios médicos y sociales vitales para la salud y el bienestar público”.    

A finales de septiembre, el Departamento de Seguridad Interna (Department of Homeland Security – DHS) anunció su propuesta de un cambio en la forma en que evaluará la admisibilidad de los inmigrantes basada en el riesgo de que se conviertan en personas dependientes del estado. Aunque la disposición de “riesgo de ser una carga pública” ha formado parte de la ley federal de inmigración desde el siglo XIX,  los nuevos reglamentos constituirían una dramática desviación de la práctica existente. Si se llega a implementar, esta propuesta podría perjudicar el bienestar de cientos de miles de inmigrantes y sus familias que ya viven en el país, además de alterar dramáticamente el tipo de inmigración legal futura para los Estados Unidos.  

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Diócesis en California ordenan a más de cuarenta al sacerdocio

En un año en que algunos legisladores de California atacaron el principal ministerio del perdón  de los sacerdotes católicos, se ordenaron 44 hombres al sacerdocio consagrado en California, aceptando el llamado de Dios para servir a su pueblo.

Las ordenaciones tuvieron lugar alrededor del estado, incluyendo en las dramáticas catedrales metropolitanas de Los Ángeles y San Francisco, siete catedrales diocesanas, desde Sacramento hasta Orange, iglesias parroquiales y las capillas de ordenes religiosas. La Arquidiócesis de Los Ángeles y la diócesis vecina de Orange

felizmente ordenaron a seis nuevos sacerdotes cada una.  

La diócesis de Monterey ordenó a cuatro sacerdotes. Los obispos en San Francisco, Oakland, Sacramento, San Bernardino ordenaron a tres sacerdotes cada uno. San José y Stockton ordenaron a dos sacerdotes mientras que Fresno y San Diego ordenaron a un sacerdote, respectivamente.

Entre las órdenes religiosas, la provincia Jesuita ordenó a seis hombres para trabajar en California. La Orden de los Predicadores (Dominicos) ordenó a dos y los Agustinos y Benedictinos ordenaron a uno, respectivamente.

La trayectoria de cada nuevo sacerdote es única, sin embargo comparten caminos similares. Cada uno de ellos escuchó con atención el llamado, oró arduamente y concluyó que era Dios quien le pedía que entregara su vida para servir como sacerdote católico.  

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A plena marcha la fiebre del final de la sesión

La Legislatura del Estado de California reanudó su sesión después del receso del verano esta semana y los legisladores ahora trabajan fervorosamente para pastorear sus proyectos de ley por ambas cámaras y hacia el escritorio del Gobernador antes de la fecha límite del final de la sesión.  Se presentaron cerca de 3,000 proyectos de ley este año, y aunque no todos estos siguen activos, la CCC aún sigue los pasos de casi 700 de esos proyectos de ley.

La sesión legislativa concluye a la medianoche del 13 de septiembre.  Usted puede esperar seguir viendo actividad con las alertas cuando los proyectos de ley sean enviados al Gobernador Newsom, quien tiene 30 días para actuar después de que le presenten los proyectos al final de la sesión.  Puesto que es la primera sesión del Gobernador Newsom, no está claro cómo será el proceso de firma de proyectos para él. No tenemos ninguna garantía sobre si firmará o vetará un proyecto de ley y cuándo, por eso le pedimos que por favor siga siendo diligente en el envío de cartas mediante las alertas.

Como siempre, visite www.cacatholic.org para un listado amplio de todos los proyectos de ley que la CCC vigila y gracias por ser una voz a favor de la vida y la dignidad en California.

 

Proyecto SB 24 sigue siendo una amenaza

Como se esperaba, el Proyecto SB 24, (Levya, D – Chino Hills) que proveería fármacos para inducir el aborto químico para las estudiantes en las universidades y colegios públicos en California, fue colocado en el archivo de suspensión durante la audiencia del Comité de Asignación de Fondos de la Asamblea esta semana, pero el proyecto de ley no ha muerto en lo absoluto.

El Proyecto SB 24 saldrá del Archivo de Suspensión y se someterá a votación en cualquier momento antes de la fecha límite del 30 de agosto del Comité de Asignación de Fondos, entonces debe usted seguir utilizando la Alerta de Acción  para decirle a los legisladores que este proyecto de ley no puede avanzar.

Los católicos a lo largo de California realizaron una novena del 3 al 11 de agosto,  pidiendo la intercesión de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe para derrotar al Proyecto SB 24. Favor de continuar atento a cualquier información actualizada sobre este proyecto y otras formas en que usted podría defender y proteger la vida en este estado.

 

La USCCB y Catholic Relief Service responden al recorte de $2-4 mil millones para el Departamento de Estado y USAID

En una carta de la Oficina de la Gerencia y Presupuesto (Office of Management and Budget – OMB) del Departamento de Estado y USAID, la Administración congeló entre $2-4 mil millones que el Congreso aprobó, y que la Administración había firmado para que entrase en vigor para los programas de desarrollo y diplomacia de América. Aunque la OMB ha eliminado la congelación, este es el primer paso de una posible anulación de los fondos asignados pero “no comprometidos” a un contrato o proyecto específico) para 10 cuentas de Desarrollo Internacional y Agencias de EE.UU. del Departamento de Estado.

Mons. Timothy P. Broglio, presidente del Comité de Justicia y Paz Internacional de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los EE.UU. y arzobispo de los Servicios Militares USA, y Sean Callahan, presidente y director general de Catholic Relief Services, publicaron la siguiente declaración oponiéndose a estos recortes:

“Las iglesias locales y Catholic Relief Services colaboran con el gobierno de los EE.UU. para reducir la pobreza, aliviar el sufrimiento y fomentar la paz alrededor del mundo.

Continúe leyendo

 

16 de agosto de 2019
Tomo 12, No. 23

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/espanol/perspectivas/perspectivas-la-violencia-y-el-racismo-aumentan-el-temor-proyecto-sb-24-sigue

Insights: Violence, Racism Raise Fears; SB 24 Still a Threat

Archbishop Gomez: “The humanity of others is never negotiable”

Violence, Racism Raise Fears but Bishops Call for Determination in Addressing the Issues

Horrific mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton merged with the national debate on racism last week, leaving many people exasperated but also forging renewed determination to combat the evils of violence and racism in our society.

“After El Paso,” wrote Los Angeles Archbishop José Gomez, it is clear “[w]e need to help our society to see our common humanity — that we are all children of God, meant to live together as brothers and sisters, no matter the color of our skin, the language we speak, or the place we were born.”

He went on to say how “[w]hite nationalism and domestic terrorism are nothing new, sadly,” mentioning the history of Japanese internment camps, the lynching of Mexicans in Texas, and the bombings of churches in the Jim Crow South.

Bishops from two California dioceses – Bishop Oscar Cantú, San Jose, and Bishop Daniel Garcia, Monterey – were especially swift in calling for action after the apparently racially motivated shooting in El Paso. 

Both their dioceses were impacted by the shooting in July at a food festival in Gilroy, a town that lies near the border of the two dioceses.  Both (along with Archbishop Gomez) also served in Texas dioceses before moving to California.

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Overhauling Legal Immigration – Through the Back Door

(This article originally appeared last year when draft rules were proposed.  The public charge ruled announced this week will become effective on October 15, 2019.  For a comprehensive analysis of the final rule visit the Catholic Legal Immigration Network’s public charge page.)

Last month, the Trump Administration announced a dramatic change to long-standing definitions of what constitutes a “public charge” for legal immigration purposes.  Bishop Vasquez, Chairman of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops’ migration committee said that the changes, if enacted, would “undercut decades of administrative policies and guidelines on how immigrants are treated…it is likely to prevent families from accessing important medical and social services vital to public health and welfare.” 

In late September, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced a proposed change in how it will evaluate the admissibility of immigrants based on their likelihood of becoming dependent upon the state. Although the “likely to be a public charge” provision has been part of federal immigration law since the 19th century, the new regulations would constitute a dramatic departure from existing practice. If implemented, this proposal could undermine the well-being of hundreds of thousands of immigrants and their families already in the country, and dramatically alter the nature of future legal immigration to the United States.

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California Dioceses Ordain More than Forty to Priesthood

In a year when some California lawmakers attacked the core forgiveness ministry of Catholic priests, 44 men were ordained to the sacred priesthood for California, accepting God’s call to serve his people.

Ordinations took place around the state, including the dramatic metropolitan cathedrals of Los Angeles and San Francisco, seven diocesan cathedrals from Sacramento to Orange, parish churches and the chapels of religious orders.

The Archdiocese of Los Angeles and the neighboring Diocese of Orange each joyfully ordained six new priests.

The Monterey diocese ordained four men. Bishops in San Francisco, Oakland, Sacramento, San Bernardino each ordained three men.  San Jose and Stockton each ordained two priests while Fresno and San Diego each ordained one.

Among the religious orders, the Jesuit province ordained six men for work in California. The Order of Preachers (Dominicans) ordained two and the Augustinians and Benedictines each ordained one.

Each new priest’s story is unique, yet they share similar paths. Each listened intently, prayed hard and concluded that it was God asking them to give their life into service as a Catholic priest.

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End of Session Rush in Full Gear

The California State Legislature reconvened from summer recess this week and legislators are now working feverishly to shepherd their bills through both houses and onto the Governor’s desk before the end-of-session deadline.  Close to 3,000 bills were introduced this year, and while not all of them are still active, the CCC is still tracking close to 700 of those bills.

The Legislative session ends at midnight on September 13. You can expect to continue to see alert activity as the bills are sent to Governor Newsom, who has 30 days to act after he is presented with bills at the end of a session. Being Governor Newsom’s first session, it is unclear how his bill signing process will look. There are no guarantees as to whether or when a bill will be signed or vetoed, so please stay diligent in sending letters via the alerts.

As always, visit www.cacatholic.org for a comprehensive list of all bills being monitored by the CCC and thank you for being a voice for life and dignity in California.

 

SB 24 Still A Threat

As to be expected, SB 24, (Levya, D – Chino Hills) the bill that would provide chemical abortion-inducing drugs for students in public colleges and universities in California, was put on the suspense file during the Assembly Appropriations Committee hearing this week, but the bill is not by any means dead.

SB 24 will come off of the Suspense File and be taken up for vote at any time before the Appropriations Committee Aug. 30 deadline, so you must continue to use the Action Alert to notify lawmakers this bill can’t move forward.

Catholics throughout California held a novena from Aug. 3 – 11 asking for intercession from Our Lady of Guadalupe to defeat SB 24. Please continue to look out for any updates on this bill and any other ways you can help speak for and protect life in this state.

 

USCCB and Catholic Relief Service respond to $2-4 billion cut for State Department and USAID

In a letter from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to the Department of State and USAID, the Administration froze between $2-4 billion that Congress approved, and the Administration signed into law for America’s development and diplomacy programs. While OMB has lifted the freeze, this is the first step in a potential rescission of the appropriated but “unobligated funds” not yet been committed to a specific contract or project) for 10 State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development accounts.

The Most Reverend Timothy P. Broglio, Chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on International Justice and Peace and Archbishop for the Military Services USA, and Sean Callahan, President and CEO of Catholic Relief Services, issued the following statement opposing these cuts

“Local churches and Catholic Relief Services partner with the U.S. government to reduce poverty, alleviate suffering, and foster peace around the world.

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August 16, 2019
Vol. 12, No. 23

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/insights-violence-racism-raise-fears-sb-24-still-threat

Archbishop Gomez: “The humanity of others is never negotiable”

Violence, Racism Raise Fears but
Bishops Call for Determination in Addressing the Issues

Horrific mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton merged with the national debate on racism last week, leaving many people exasperated but also forging renewed determination to combat the evils of violence and racism in our society.

“After El Paso,” wrote Los Angeles Archbishop José Gomez, it is clear “[w]e need to help our society to see our common humanity — that we are all children of God, meant to live together as brothers and sisters, no matter the color of our skin, the language we speak, or the place we were born.”

He went on to say how “[w]hite nationalism and domestic terrorism are nothing new, sadly,” mentioning the history of Japanese internment camps, the lynching of Mexicans in Texas, and the bombings of churches in the Jim Crow South.

Bishops from two California dioceses – Bishop Oscar Cantú, San Jose, and Bishop Daniel Garcia, Monterey – were especially swift in calling for action after the apparently racially motivated shooting in El Paso. 

Both their dioceses were impacted by the shooting in July at a food festival in Gilroy, a town that lies near the border of the two dioceses.  Both (along with Archbishop Gomez) also served in Texas dioceses before moving to California.

Bishop Cantú expanded the on need to watch out for each other:

“[W]e are reminded that each of us in the human family bears responsibility for each other: for brother, sister, neighbor,” wrote Bishop Cantú.  “Thus, it is important that we realize the impact that language and attitudes of racism, discrimination, and hatred can have on others.”

During his homily at a Mass to pray for the victims, Bishop Garcia of Monterey recalled how he was once denied enrollment in a school because of his ethnicity. 

He asked the faithful of his diocese to tell our leaders that “enough is enough and we need to seek some kind of change in the way we are treating the present situation.”

In the last week, Bishops of several USCCB committees also stressed the need to change the public discourse:  “[H]ate-filled rhetoric and ideas can become the motivation for some to commit acts of violence. The anti-immigrant, anti-refugee, anti-Muslim, and anti-Semitic sentiments that have been publicly proclaimed in our society in recent years have incited hatred in our communities.

“We, therefore, renew our call to all to act swiftly to stop using hate-filled language that demeans and divides us and motivates some to such horrific violence. Instead, we ask our leaders and all Americans to work to unite us as a great, diverse, and welcoming people.”

Last year, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops issued a pastoral letter dealing with the persistent history of racism in the United States. 

Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love defined racism as when “either consciously or unconsciously—a person holds that his or her own race or ethnicity is superior, and therefore judges persons of other races or ethnicities as inferior and unworthy of equal regard. When this conviction or attitude leads individuals or groups to exclude, ridicule, mistreat, or unjustly discriminate against persons on the basis of their race or ethnicity, it is sinful.”

The statement urges individuals to examine their own attitudes and work to correct any injustice exhibited by themselves or their parishes, schools or communities.

FBI statistics say that the majority of hate crimes are based on race, ethnicity, or ancestry closely followed by religion.  The shootings in El Paso targeting Hispanics or the synagogue violence in Poway, CA, and Pittsburg, PA, are just some of the latest examples.   The shooter in Gilroy also had a list of religious institutions authorities believe were potential targets.

Combatting ethnic and religious violence in this nation has its challenges, even in liberal California.

A recent attempt to forge a model diversity curriculum failed to include antisemitism in its program.  According to the California Legislative Jewish Caucus, “we find it alarming – to say the least – that at a time when Nazis are marching openly in Charlottesville chanting “Jews will not replace us,” and Jews in our own state are being physically attacked in houses of worship, the [curriculum] would intentionally turn a blind eye to hatred and discrimination against our community.”  The error was soon corrected but it illustrates the point that recognizing racism – whereever it is encountered — is critical.

In their letter, the U.S. Bishops are unequivocal on calling Christians to recognize and to fight racism:

“The injustice and harm racism causes are an attack on human life. The Church in the United States has spoken out consistently and forcefully against abortion, assisted suicide, euthanasia, the death penalty, and other forms of violence that threaten human life. It is not a secret that these attacks on human life have severely affected people of color, who are disproportionally affected by poverty, targeted for abortion, have less access to healthcare, have the greatest numbers on death row, and are most likely to feel pressure to end their lives when facing serious illness. As bishops, we unequivocally state that racism is a life issue.  Accordingly, we will not cease to speak forcefully against and work toward ending racism.”

Archbishop Gomez put it more simply and, perhaps, more eloquently:

“The way we honor the lives taken at El Paso is to live with true Christian love — and to live for the vision of America that their killer denied.”

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/policies-issues/reverence-life-human-dignity/archbishop-gomez-%E2%80%9C-humanity-others-never-negotiable%E2%80%9D

California Dioceses Ordain More than Forty to Priesthood

In a year when some California lawmakers attacked the core forgiveness ministry of Catholic priests, 44 men were ordained to the sacred priesthood for California, accepting God’s call to serve his people.

Ordinations took place around the state, including the dramatic metropolitan cathedrals of Los Angeles and San Francisco, seven diocesean cathedrals from Sacramento to Orange, parish churches and the chapels of religious orders.

The Archdiocese of Los Angeles and the neighboring Diocese of Orange each joyfully ordained six new priests.

The Monterey diocese ordained four men. Bishops in San Francisco, Oakland, Sacramento, San Bernardino each ordained three men.  San Jose and Stockton each ordained two priests while Fresno and San Diego each ordained one.

Among the religious orders the Jesuit province ordained six men for work in California. The Order of Preachers (Dominicans) ordained two and the Augustinians and Benedictines each ordained one.

Related Video:  Bishop Robert Barron – Every Priest is a Jacob’s Ladder

Each new priest’s story is unique, yet they share similar paths. Each listened intently, prayed hard and concluded that it was God asking them to give their life into service as a Catholic priest.

All share their powerful personal vision of the service they want to give their communities as a priest.

Fr. Dean Marshall, ordained for the Sacramento diocese, for instance, was not baptized Catholic until age 20 but he heard his non-Catholic father say “you’re going to be a priest one day!”

Fr. Marshall explains his discernment is “taking a chance and trusting God.”

In Orange Bishop Kevin Vann ordained six new priests in the compelling new Christ Cathedral just ten days after its dedication, Fr. Martin Duc, Fr. Anh Vu, Fr. Daniel Jonguen Seo, Fr. Erialdo Ramírez Alfaro, Fr. Scott Jameson Allen and Fr. Joseph Vincent Squillacioti.

Three are of Vietnamese parentage, reflecting strength of the rapidly growing Orange County Catholic community.   (Read about each one here.)

In Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez ordained six men from diverse backgrounds to preach the good news in the sprawling archdiocese of five million Catholics: Fr. Brian Humphrey, Fr. Miguel Ángel Ruiz, Fr. Emmanuel Delfin, Fr.Luther Diaz, Fr. Louis Sung and Fr. José María Ortiz.

“You, my brothers, are called to be the shepherds of God’s people,” Archbishop Gomez told the men. “And Jesus is calling you to do it as he did — serving your brothers and sisters in humility, from the heart, and at a personal sacrifice.

“My dear brothers,” Gomez emphasized, “I have to tell you: it is so exciting to be a priest. I wouldn’t trade my vocation for anything! There is nothing more beautiful than to bring people to the encounter with Jesus Christ, so they can know and love him and imitate him and work to make this world his kingdom.”

Their ordination took place in a packed cathedral, live-streamed so family and friends, some as far away as the Philippines and Mexico, could participate.

For Fr. Humphrey a powerful sign of faith’s enduring power was the careful passing to him of a chalice, by an uncle, also a priest. The sacred vessel had been made for Fr. Humphrey’s great-great uncle’s 1906 ordination in New York, and then passed to succeeding generations of priests in the family. Fr. Humphrey is his family’s fourth generation to celebrate Holy Mass with the chalice.

In the San Bernardino diocese, 1,500 people jammed Rancho Cucamonga’s Sacred Heart parish church for ordination of three priests by Bishop Gerald Barnes.

A Navy veteran, Fr. Charles ‘Gino’ Galley said it was a “greater power beyond me that I had an encounter with. I cannot explain it. I experienced it as I lay prostrate on the floor and the whole church was singing the Litany of Saints.”

Ordained with him were Fr. Ted Drennan and Fr. Juan Carlos Lopez.

“I hope to be a good priest,” said Fr. Lopez. “I hope that I will be able to minister to the people and be faithful to them…especially today when we really need good priests. One person can make a difference!”

“We need you. We need you desperately!” Bishop Barnes said. “We need you to help us revitalize our priesthood, our Church, our people. We thank you for saying ‘yes.’ ”

For Monterey, it is the second successive year the relatively small diocese (about 200,000 Catholics) has ordained four men.

Prayer for New Priest

Good Lord, please strengthen and inspire the people who have dedicated their lives to your service–our priests, brothers, sisters and those still in formation. In particular, bring to this year’s newly ordained priests the grace they need to inspire us lay Catholics. Help them to recognize the love that we lay Catholics have for them and our appreciation for the great sacrifices they make to help us follow your way. Keep them always close to you and to us. Amen.

The new priests ordained by Bishop Daniel E. Garcia, are Fr. Miguel Aguayo, Fr. Gerson Espinosa, Fr. Raphael Reniva, and Fr. Karl Tolentino.

In Sacramento, ordained with Fr. Marshall (above) are Fr. Manuel Rodriguez, who grew up in Vallejo’s St. Basil parish, and Fr. Stephen Joseph W. Wood, who grew up in Auburn’s St. Joseph parish.

In San Francisco, Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone ordained three men, and promptly assigned them to parishes to begin learning pastoral skills with veteran pastors and the faithful.

Fr. Kyle Faller is now serving in St. Pius Parish, Redwood City; Fr. Ernesto Jandonero is in St. Hilary Parish in Tiburon; and Fr. Michael P. Rocha is in Church of the Epiphany, San Francisco.

The Fresno diocese celebrated the ordination of Fr. David Alan Lopez by a beaming Bishop Armando X. Ochoa, shortly before the bishop’s spring retirement.

Stockton, the Central Valley’s third diocese, was blessed on July 6 when Bishop Myron J. Cotta ordained Fr. Adrian Cisneros and Fr. Larry Machado.

Fr. Cisneros first felt the call at his grandmother’s funeral, as he felt the impact of the parish priest’s presence.

“I thought–wow, how amazing would it be to be a priest and be able to have such a positive impact on a person or family just by one’s presence!”

Fr. Machado began studies to be a doctor, but soon felt a calling “not to be a medical doctor, but a physician of souls.”

In the San Jose diocese, Bishop Oscar Cantu ordained two of its native sons into the priesthood.

Fr. John Tu Hoang was born and raised in San Jose, the youngest of five children. Early in adult life Fr. Hoang worked a wide variety of jobs, from claims adjusting to disc jockey, before he heard the call to the priesthood.

Fr. Victor M. Trinidad, a Santa Clara native, was in computer science when his pastor, Msgr. Steven Perata, suggested he consider the seminary.

“What started as a simple, unconditional yes to God has grown to an abundance of blessings for me, but not without its crosses,” Fr. Trinidad said. “As Jesus says, ‘No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.’ ” (John 15:13).

In the San Diego diocese, Bishop Robert W. McElroy chose Corpus Christi parish church in Bonita, rather than the Cathedral, to ordain Fr. Michael Maurice O’Connor in his home church.

Born Catholic, Fr. O’Connor recalls growing up largely uninterested in the Church but as a UC Berkeley freshman, a friend invited him to Sunday Mass. That simple act rekindled O’Connor’s interest in his faith. The seed had been planted.

He became a UC San Diego neurobiologist. “As an academic scientist I knew I was helping build a better world,” Fr. O’Connor says. He entered the seminary as he came to realize “I was doing far greater good when my life was aimed toward helping people find God, and so love Him more and more.”

Among the religious orders present in California, four celebrated ordinations to the priesthood this year.

In the Society of Jesus, six new Jesuits are working in California (part of the multi-state Jesuits West province); the Dominicans (Order of Preachers) ordained two men to the priesthood in Oakland and the Augustinians (Order of Saint Augustine) celebrated the ordination last December of one new priest.  Finally, the contemplative Benedictine community of monks in Prince of Peace Abbey (Oceanside) celebrated the June ordination of one new priest.

The Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA), which collects data and insights into the priesthood in the U.S., projected that 481 men would be ordained into the priesthood this year in the United States.

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/california-dioceses-ordain-more-forty-priesthood

Perspectivas: Ley de CA Para una Juventud Sana; Novena para derrotar el proyecto de ley SB 24

Lo que usted debe saber sobre la Ley de CA para una Juventud Sana

La implementación de la educación integral sobre la salud sexual en las escuelas públicas, conforme a la Ley de CA para una Juventud Sana (“California Healthy Youth Act – CHYA”) del 2015, es preocupante para un creciente número de familias católicas. Para esos padres o tutores, algunos planes de estudios o programas recomendados por el estado que pudieran enseñarse (si los distritos escolares deciden adoptarlos) incluyen instrucciones gráficas e ideas y comportamientos moralmente censurables.  Reconociendo este efecto, este artículo y el enlace inferior procuran aclarar lo que la ley establece y otros asuntos relacionados.

Desde que entró en vigor la CHYA el 1 de enero de 2016, se ha requerido que los distritos escolares de las escuelas públicas en California, provean a los estudiantes en los grados 7-12 una educación integral sobre la salud sexual e información acerca de la prevención del VIH.  Con arreglo a esta ley, los distritos escolares incluso pueden elegir ofrecer instrucción  “adecuada para determinadas edades” antes del séptimo grado. Aunque cada distrito escolar puede determinar su propio plan de estudio, la enseñanza debe reunir ciertos criterios, tales como ser médicamente correcta y objetiva; ser adecuada para emplearse con estudiantes de todas las razas, géneros, orientaciones sexuales, y orígenes étnicos y culturales;  reconociendo afirmativamente las distintas orientaciones sexuales e incluyendo las relaciones entre personas del mismo sexo en el diálogo; y enseñar acerca del género, la expresión del género, la identidad del género, y lo perjudicial de los estereotipos negativos en relación al género.

Un elemento importante de la CHYA ha sido que haya reconocido el derecho de los padres de familia de supervisar la educación sobre la salud sexual de sus hijos: “La Legislatura reconoce que aunque los padres y tutores arrolladoramente apoyan la educación sexual integral, médicamente correcta, los padres y tutores tienen la responsabilidad suprema de impartir valores respecto a la sexualidad humana en sus hijos”. 

Continúe leyendo

 

Novena para derrotar el proyecto de ley para los abortos químicos

Más de la mitad de las diócesis en California han aceptado la invitación del obispo de Sacramento y presidente de la CCC, Mons. Jaime Soto, para sumarse a la novena dedicada a la derrota del proyecto de ley SB 24, el proyecto de la senadora Connie Leyva (D-Chino) que mandaría que las clínicas de salud de la universidad estatal de California distribuyan medicamentos para inducir el aborto.

“En este momento crítico, insto a todos los católicos y a todos los cristianos para que se unan en oración”, manifestó Mons. Soto en una carta dirigida a los fieles. Del 3 de agosto hasta el 11 de agosto, recen conmigo una novena a Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, patrona de los niños aún no nacidos, pidiéndole su poderosa intercesión para derrotar este proyecto de ley. Nuestra propia acción católica es importante porque debemos obtener sabiduría y fortaleza de nuestra oración “.  

Angela Gilliard, directora de las políticas de salud para el sistema de  la UC, ha expresado su preocupación referente a los aumentos en los fondos para que las estudiantes ubiquen una fuente de fondos para el proyecto SB 24. Otros expresivos defensores de la libre elección se oponen al proyecto de ley, incluyendo la Academia para la Medicina Preventiva de California.

El arzobispo de Los Ángeles, Mons. José Gómez, en una columna publicada esta semana , habló sobre la creciente necesidad de que los católicos participen en el proceso político. Él aludió al proyecto SB 24 como un ejemplo de por qué uno debe involucrarse:

“En este momento en California, existe la legislación, el proyecto de ley 24 del Senado,” mencionó el Arzobispo, “que requeriría que todas las universidades y colegios del estado ofrezcan a las estudiantes el acceso gratuito a la ‘píldora abortiva’ . Pero una sociedad compasiva debería tener más para ofrecer a las mujeres que pasan necesidad que la habilidad de poner fin a la vida de sus hijos antes de que ellos nazcan”.

El Arzobispo Salvatore Cordileone ofrecerá una Misa especial  para conmemorar el final de la novena el 11 de agosto en la Catedral de Santa María.

El proyecto de ley actualmente se encuentra en el Comité de Asignación de Fondos de la Asamblea y tiene programada una audiencia este mes. Favor de mantenerse atento(a) a las Alertas de Acción para ayudar a derrotar este proyecto de ley.

Usted podrá encontrar la oración de la novena en inglés y en español, así como el mensaje del Obispo Soto aquí y la Alerta de Acción aquí.

 

Arquidiócesis de San Francisco lamenta la pérdida de su obispo auxiliar, Mons. Robert Christian

Trece meses después de su ordenación, el obispo auxiliar de San Francisco, Mons. Robert Christian, OP, falleció mientras dormía en el Seminario y Universidad de St. Patrick en Menlo Park. El Obispo Christian, el rector-presidente del seminario tenía 70 años.

El Arzobispo Salvatore J. Cordileone expresó: “Me entristeció enormemente enterarme esta mañana de la muerte del Obispo Christian.  La Arquidiócesis fue muy bendecida de contar con su sabiduría y liderazgo como obispo auxiliar, aunque haya sido por un corto periodo de tiempo y un tiempo aún más breve como rector del Seminario.  Nos sumamos a la comunidad de los Dominicos para orar por el descanso de su alma y por la paz y el consuelo de su maravillosa familia en este tiempo de luto”.  

Continúe leyendo

 

Fieles en la Diócesis de Orange celebran su nueva catedral

Miles de personas se reunieron en una semana de celebración por la dedicación de la Catedral de Cristo en la Diócesis de Orange.  Originalmente conocida como la “Crystal Cathedral”, esta Catedral fue construida por el Dr. Robert Schuller, quien inició su ministerio predicando en los auto cinemas. La Hora del Poder del  Dr. Schuller se convirtió en el programa religioso más visto de la televisión en la década de 1980.

Para el 2010, ese ministerio enfrentaba dificultades económicas a la vez que la Diócesis de Orange emprendía una iniciativa para construir una nueva Catedral. La diócesis ya había comprado una propiedad cuando salió a la venta el sitio de 32 acres de la Crystal Cathedral.  El Dr. Schuller pidió al juez de bancarrotas que vendiera la Catedral a la diócesis, a pesar de que la Universidad Chapman había ofrecido pagar más.

La Diócesis de Orange ha pasado los últimos siete años renovando el campus, que incluye una parroquia, escuela, oficinas administrativas, cementerio, centro cultural, un estudio de televisión y más.

La Catedral de Cristo es hogar de la Diócesis de Orange y de los 1,3 millones de católicos en la región. La dedicación de la Catedral fue noticia nacional.  Lea algunos de los artículos publicados al respecto, incluyendo reseñas arquitectónicas de la nueva iglesia, aquí.

 

Rol de los legisladores destacado en el cuidado de nuestra casa común

En su reciente declaración pastoralDios llama a todos a cuidar nuestra casa común , los Obispos de California pidieron que todos atendamos el llamado a una conversión espiritual que respete nuestra casa común y que se preocupe por todos.  También identificaron las obligaciones concretas de los legisladores, funcionarios públicos, y otros gobernantes que “debido a su influencia sobre las instituciones, tienen las responsabilidades adicionales de defender el bien común”.

Desde luego que la expresión más visible de esa responsabilidad ,para un legislador, es mediante la legislación y la Conferencia Católica de California (CCC) sigue abogando por muchas propuestas, al igual que lo hacía antes de que se publicara Laudato Si’.

Por ejemplo, una legislación clave apoyada por la CCC fue el proyecto de ley SR 37, el cual alentaba a que la legislatura de California estudiara y tomara en cuenta la Encíclica Papal al considerar el cambio climático en la acción legislativa relevante. Esa resolución fue adoptada el verano del 2015, unos cuantos meses después de la publicación de la encíclica.  

Continúe leyendo

 

2 de agosto de 2019
Tomo 12, No. 23

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/espanol/perspectivas-ley-de-ca-para-una-juventud-sana-novena-para-derrotar-el-proyecto-de-ley-sb-24

Lo que debe saber sobre la Ley de CA para una Juventud Sana

To read in English, click here.

La implementación de la educación integral sobre la salud sexual en las escuelas públicas, conforme a la Ley de CA para una Juventud Sana (“California Healthy Youth Act – CHYA”) del 2015, es preocupante para un creciente número de familias católicas. Para esos padres o tutores, algunos planes de estudios o programas recomendados por el estado que pudieran enseñarse (si los distritos escolares deciden adoptarlos) incluyen instrucciones gráficas e ideas y comportamientos moralmente censurables.  Reconociendo este efecto, este artículo y el enlace inferior procuran aclarar lo que la ley establece y otros asuntos relacionados.

Desde que entró en vigor la CHYA el 1 de enero de 2016, se ha requerido que los distritos escolares de las escuelas públicas en California, provean a los estudiantes de los grados 7-12 una educación integral sobre la salud sexual e información acerca de la prevención del VIH.  Con arreglo a esta ley, los distritos escolares incluso pueden elegir ofrecer instrucción  “adecuada para determinadas edades” antes del séptimo grado. Aunque cada distrito escolar puede determinar su propio plan de estudios, la enseñanza debe reunir ciertos criterios, tales como ser médicamente correcta y objetiva; ser adecuada para emplearse con estudiantes de todas las razas, géneros, orientaciones sexuales, y orígenes étnicos y culturales;  reconociendo afirmativamente las distintas orientaciones sexuales e incluyendo las relaciones entre personas del mismo sexo en el diálogo; y enseñar acerca del género, la expresión del género, la identidad del género, y lo perjudicial de los estereotipos negativos en relación al género.

Un elemento importante de la CHYA ha sido que haya reconocido el derecho de los padres de supervisar la educación sobre la salud sexual de sus hijos: “La Legislatura reconoce que aunque los padres y tutores arrolladoramente apoyan la educación sexual integral, médicamente correcta, los padres y tutores tienen la responsabilidad suprema de impartir valores respecto a la sexualidad humana a sus hijos”. En el reconocimiento de este derecho y responsabilidad, la Ley requiere: 1) que las escuelas informen a los padres de familia y tutores acerca de la instrucción planeada, 2) permite que los padres y tutores inspeccionen los materiales con antelación a la instrucción, y 3) permite que ellos eximan a sus hijos de participar en toda o parte de la enseñanza sobre la salud sexual, enseñanza sobre la prevención del VIH, y las valoraciones relacionadas a esas enseñanzas. 

Aunque es encomiable la deferencia de la ley para con los padres, existe cierta ambigüedad respecto al alcance de la disposición de la “exclusión voluntaria” (“opt-out”). De forma particular, ha habido cierta confusión y preocupación en varios distritos escolares en California sobre si la disposición de la “exclusión voluntaria” aplica a la instrucción que implica el diálogo acerca de la identidad de género y la orientación sexual. 

La confusión deriva de una disposición aparentemente contradictoria de la CHYA (Artículo 51932(b)), el cual establece que la ley (y por consiguiente la disposición de la “exclusión voluntaria”) “no aplica a la instrucción, materiales, presentaciones, o programación que traten los temas del género, identidad de género, expresión del género, orientación sexual, discriminación, acoso, “bullying”, intimidación, relaciones, o la familia y que no mencionen los órganos reproductivos de los humanos y sus funciones”.  La Junta de Educación del Condado de Orange ha asumido la postura de que si se ofrece la instrucción sobre la educación sexual en “módulos independientes” y uno de esos módulos trata el tema de la identidad de género u orientación sexual sin aludir a los órganos reproductivos y sus funciones, entonces no se les permite a los padres eximir a sus hijos de ese módulo o diálogo  particular. 

Sin embargo, la Conferencia Católica de California (CCC) tiene la firme convicción de que este análisis es erróneo.  La CHYA, según sus propios términos, aplica a la “educación integral  sobre la salud sexual”, la cual deberá incluir la instrucción referente a la orientación sexual y la identidad/expresión de género.  Específicamente, esta Ley provee que la instrucción respecto a la “educación integral sobre la salud sexual” debe “reconocer afirmativamente que las personas tienen diferentes orientaciones sexuales y, cuando se dialoga o se dan ejemplos de relaciones y parejas, se debe ser inclusivo con las relaciones entre personas del mismo sexo”. La CHYA también requiere que la “instrucción y materiales enseñen a los alumnos sobre el género, la expresión de género, identidad de género, y analice lo perjudicial de los estereotipos negativos del género”. Tomando en cuenta el requisito de la Ley de proveer instrucción sobre la orientación sexual y la identidad/expresión de género como parte del programa de la “educación integral sobre la salud sexual” de una escuela – aunque esta instrucción sea presentada en “módulos independientes” sin aludir a los órganos reproductivos o sus funciones – la única conclusión razonable es que a los padres se les debería dar la oportunidad de eximir a sus hijos de una parte o de todo el programa.

Cabe plantearse entonces la pregunta – ¿Cuál fue la intención de la Legislatura al incluir el Artículo 51932(b), el cual, en efecto, no permite que los padres excluyan voluntariamente a sus hijos de la instrucción y de la programación donde se trate el tema del género, la identidad/expresión de género, y la orientación sexual y que no aluda a los órganos reproductivos de los humanos y sus funciones? No queda clara la respuesta pero una posible interpretación es que esta disposición aplica a las áreas de instrucción y del plan de estudios no relacionadas y desvinculadas de la educación integral sobre la salud sexual y clases educativas sobre la prevención del VIH que ofrece un distrito escolar, tales como las lecciones de estudios sociales en relación al rol y las contribuciones de californianos LGBT prominentes.  Por tanto, en situaciones donde se tratan en una clase los temas de la orientación sexual y la identidad/expresión de género, por separado de la educación sobre la salud sexual y fuera del alcance de la CHYA, se supone que los padres no tendrían la opción de eximir a sus hijos de participar en esos diálogos.

Como no está claro el alcance de de los derechos de los padres conforme a la CHYA, los padres deberían aprovechar la oportunidad para comunicarse con sus escuelas y distritos escolares para pedir clarificación y para abogar para que se respeten al máximo los derechos de los padres de familia.  Esta responsabilidad de los padres la afirman tanto el Catecismo de la Iglesia Católica (2223), la cual reconoce que los padres son los primeros responsables de la educación de sus hijos, así como la misma ley CHYA, la cual, como se menciona arriba, reconoce que “los padres y tutores tienen la grave responsabilidad de impartir valores respecto a la sexualidad humana a sus hijos”.

Medidas que los padres pueden tomar y preguntas que se pueden hacer en las escuelas y distritos escolares locales

Paso # 1. Asegúrese de que se le notifique

  • Si los padres no recibieron notificación respecto a la educación sobre la salud sexual de su hijo/a(s), pregunte a la escuela/distrito: ¿Cómo y cuándo se les notifica a los padres acerca de la instrucción planeada para la educación integral sobre la salud sexual y la prevención del VIH?
  • Si los padres no están seguros sobre qué distrito escolar corresponde a su(s) hijo/a(s), favor véase el siguiente enlace: (https://www.cde.ca.gov/schooldirectory/).  Este sitio web, mantenido por el Departamento de Educación de California, es donde uno sencillamente puede ingresar su propio código postal para identificar el distrito escolar/escuelas correspondientes.

Paso # 2. Revise el plan de estudios cuidadosamente. 

  • Si la notificación no lo indica, pregunte a la escuela/distrito:  ¿Cómo y cuándo pueden los padres revisar todos los materiales didácticos del plan de estudios que se utilizarán para la educación integral?  Esto podría estar disponible en-línea o en la escuela/distrito.
  • Los materiales del plan de estudios deben ser estudiados juiciosamente para determinar que lo que se enseñará a los hijos respecto a la sexualidad humana es aceptable para los padres y que se favorecen los valores que ellos desean impartir.  Por ejemplo: ¿La instrucción y los materiales incluyen información sobre la abstinencia?  (El Código de Educación requiere que la instrucción y los materiales incluyan información de que la abstinencia es la única forma segura de prevenir el VIH, otras enfermedades transmitidas sexualmente, y un embarazo no deseado.  También indica: ‘La instrucción deberá proporcionar información sobre el valor de postergar la actividad sexual a la vez que provee información médica precisa acerca de otros métodos de prevención del VIH y otras infecciones transmitidas sexualmente, así como el embarazo’.  La educación sexual de ‘Sólo Abstinencia’, que ofrece la abstinencia como única opción para prevenir las enfermedades transmitidas sexualmente y el embarazo no deseado, no se permite en las escuelas públicas en California”.)
  • Si al revisar el plan de estudios no le queda claro, pregunte a la escuela/distrito:

    • ¿A los alumnos se les enseña sobre los temas de la sexualidad humana en torno a la identidad de genero/orientación sexual en otras áreas del plan de estudios aparte de la educación integral sobre la salud sexual?
    • ¿Quién impartirá la instrucción a mi hijo/a(s) en la educación integral sobre la salud sexual y en qué curso?
    • ¿Quién decide si la instrucción y los materiales son “adecuados para determinadas edades” (especialmente si el distrito opta por brindar la educación sobre la salud sexual antes del séptimo grado?

Paso # 3. Ejercite su opción de eximir, como desee.

  • Si los padres de familia optaran por eximir a su hijo/a(s) de toda o parte de la educación integral sobre la salud sexual, deberán hacerlo firmemente por escrito.  Si no se indica en la notificación y/o en los materiales del plan de estudios, pregunte a la escuela/distrito: ¿Qué formulario de “Exclusión Voluntaria (“Opt-Out” ) se debe utilizar y cuándo y a quién se le debe entregar?
  • Para obtener mayor información sobre los “Derechos y obligaciones de los padres/tutores con hijos en las escuelas públicas respecto a la educación sobre la salud sexual”, haga clic aquí.

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/espanol/noticias-en-espanol/lo-que-debe-saber-sobre-la-ley-de-ca-para-una-juventud-sana

Insights: CA Healthy Youth Act; Novena to Defeat SB 24

What You Need to Know about the CA Healthy Youth Act

Implementation of comprehensive sexual health education in public schools, per the “California Healthy Youth Act” (“CHYA”) of 2015, is of concern to a growing number of Catholic families.  For those parents or guardians, some state-recommended curricula that may be taught (if school districts decide to adopt) includes graphic instructions and morally objectionable ideas and behavior.  Recognizing this effect, this article, and the link below, seeks to clarify the law and related issues.

Since taking effect on January 1, 2016, the CHYA has required California public school districts to provide students in grades seven through twelve with comprehensive sexual health education and HIV prevention information.  Under this law, school districts may even choose to offer “age-appropriate” instruction earlier than Grade 7.  While each school district can determine its own curriculum, the instruction must meet certain standards, such as being medically accurate and objective; being appropriate for use with students of all races, genders, sexual orientations, and ethnic and cultural backgrounds; affirmatively recognizing different sexual orientations and including same-sex relationships in discussions; and teaching about gender, gender expression, gender identity, and the harm of negative gender stereotypes.    

A significant element of the CHYA has been its recognition of the right of parents to supervise their children’s sexual health education: “The Legislature recognizes that while parents and guardians overwhelmingly support medically accurate, comprehensive sex education, parents and guardians have the ultimate responsibility for imparting values regarding human sexuality to their children.” 

Continue Reading

 

Novena to Defeat Chemical Abortion Bill

More than half of the dioceses in California have accepted Sacramento Bishop and CCC President Jaime Soto’s invitation to join him in a novena dedicated to defeating SB 24, the bill by Senator Connie Leyva (D-Chino) that would mandate California state university health clinics dispense abortion-inducing medications.

“At this critical moment, I urge all Catholics and all Christians to join together in prayer,” said Bishop Soto in a letter to the faithful. “ From August 3 through August 11, pray with me a novena to Our Lady of Guadalupe, patroness of unborn children, asking her powerful intercession to defeat this bill. Our own political action is important but we must also draw wisdom and strength from prayer.”

Angela Gilliard, Director of Health Policy for the UC system, has expressed concern over funding increases for students to accommodate a source of funding for SB 24. Other vocal pro-choice advocates are opposing the bill, including the California Academy for Preventative Medicine.

Los Angeles Archbishop Jose Gomez, in a column published this week, spoke of the increased need for Catholics to be engaged in the political process.  He referenced SB 24 as exemplifying the need to be involved:

“Right now, in California, there is legislation, Senate Bill 24,” said the Archbishop, “that would require all state colleges and universities to offer students free access to the ‘abortion pill.’ But a compassionate society should have more to offer women in need than the ability to end the life of their children before they are born.”

Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone will offer a special Mass marking the end of the novena on August 11 at St. Mary’s Cathedral.

The bill currently sits in the Assembly Appropriations Committee and is scheduled to have a hearing this month. Please stay tuned for Action Alerts to help defeat this bill. 

You can find the novena prayer in English and Spanish, as well as Bishop Soto’s message here and the Action Alert here.

 

SF Archdiocese Mourns Loss of Auxiliary Bishop Robert Christian

Thirteen months after his ordination, San Francisco Auxiliary Bishop Robert Christian, OP, passed away in his sleep at St. Patrick’s Seminary University in Menlo Park. Bishop Christian, the seminary’s rector-president, was 70 years old. 

Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone said “I was deeply saddened to learn this morning of the passing of Bishop Christian.  The Archdiocese was greatly blessed to have his wisdom and leadership even if for so brief a time as auxiliary bishop and even briefer time as rector of the Seminary.  We join with the Dominican community in praying for the repose of his soul and for peace and comfort for his wonderful family in their time of mourning.”

Continue Reading

 

Faithful in Diocese of Orange Celebrate New Cathedral

Thousands joined in a week of celebration for the dedication of Christ Cathedral in the Diocese of Orange.  Originally called the Crystal Cathedral, the Cathedral was built by Dr. Robert Schuller, who began his ministry preaching in drive-in theaters.  Dr.  Schuller’s Hour of Power became the most watched religious show on television in the 1980s.

By 2010, the ministry faced financial hardship at the same time that the Diocese of Orange undertook an effort to build a new Cathedral.  The diocese had already purchased property when the 32-acre Crystal Cathedral site came up for sale.  Dr. Schuller asked the bankruptcy judge to sell the Cathedral to the diocese despite the fact that a higher offer came from Chapman University.

The Diocese of Orange has spent the last seven years renovating the campus, which includes a parish, school, administrative offices, cemetery, cultural center, a television studio and more.

Christ Cathedral is home to the Diocese of Orange and the region’s 1.3 million Catholics.   The dedication made national news.  Read some of the reporting, including architectural reviews of the new church, here.

 

Role of Policy Makers Highlighted in Caring for Our Common Home

In their recent pastoral statementGod Calls Us to Care for Our Common Home, the California Bishops asked all to heed the call to a spiritual conversion that respects our common home and cares for all.  They also identified specific responsibility for lawmakers, public officials, and other policymakers who “because of their influence over institutions, have extra responsibilities for upholding the common good.”

Of course, the most visible expression of that responsibility for a lawmaker is through legislation and the California Catholic Conference (CCC) continues to advocate on behalf of many proposals, just as it did prior to the release of Laudato Si’.

For instance, a key piece of legislation supported by the CCC was SR 37, which encouraged the California legislature to study and take into account the Papal Encyclical when considering climate change in relevant legislative action. That resolution was adopted the summer of 2015 a few months after the release of the encyclical.

Continue Reading

 

August 2, 2019
Vol. 12, No. 21

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/insights-ca-healthy-youth-act-novena-defeat-sb-24

Novena to Defeat Chemical Abortion Bill

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/novena-defeat-chemical-abortion-bill

Pastoral Statement Summary: God Calls Us to Care for Our Common Home

SACRAMENTO, CA – Cherishing the many natural blessings of the Golden State while expressing growing concern with escalating threats to our world, the Catholic Bishops of California have issued a pastoral statement calling on all people to “contribute to the ecological well-being of our state.”

“We are publishing our Pastoral Statement on the fourth anniversary of Laudato Si’ with a two-fold vision in mind,” say the Bishops: “To animate and energize the implementation in California of what Laudato Si’ calls us to do, and to offer a dynamic teaching and evangelization tool for our Catholic faith community and beyond, especially for young people.”

In God Calls Us All to Care for Our Common Home, the Bishops challenge the people of California to appreciate the beauty of the state and to apply – both individually and collectively – the teachings of Laudato Si’  in safeguarding our natural gifts.

The statement emphasizes the Catholic concept of the common good – “the sum total of social conditions that allow us to access the resources and services necessary for a dignified life”  — in relationship to the environment and the people of California. 

It follows by building on the concept of “integral ecology” first explored be Saint Pope John Paul II and expanded upon by Pope Francis.  The teaching emphasizes that stewardship of nature must first be at the service of advancing the good of all people in their environmental, economic and cultural dimensions.

God Calls Us All to Care for Our Common Home, most importantly, aims to encourage the practical applications of these teaching. 

In the second section, the California Catholic Conference of Bishops challenge different groups to do their part:

  • Pastoral leaders and Catholic institutions are encouraged to share practical tools of teaching that proclaim the encyclical’s themes.
  • The Bishops ask youth and young adults to find opportunities to pray in natural surroundings and initiate conversations with older adults about environmental protection.
  • Parents, teachers, and catechists are encouraged to help create an environmental consciousness and literacy that promotes the principles of Laudato Si’ in every family’s lifestyle.
  • The statement suggests that public officials enact policies that improve air quality, reduce polluting gases, strengthen water systems, protect precious ecosystems, and support the health of our citizens.
  • Leaders in business are encouraged to consider to what extent their business enterprises, its products, and its marketing meet genuine human needs and promotes the common good.
  • The Bishops suggest that those who work the land and care for it reflect on how their work can best balance economic production and environmental protection with attention to greater sustainability.
  • The statement calls on artists and innovators to find new ways to highlight the beauty of creation and inspire a culture of ecological and human care in the light of the moral applications of the Pope’s encyclical.

Finally, echoing Laudato Si’, the Bishops conclude with a call to a spiritual conversion that respects our common home and cares for all, especially the poor and vulnerable.

“Ecological conversion challenges us to advance in culture, to grow spiritually, and to be better educated about the world entrusted by God to our care. The heavens and the earth belong to God, but we have been called to be good stewards.”

Resource Links:

Care for Our Common Home Summary | PDF

Care for Our Common Home Statement | PDF

Care for Our Common Home Summary (ESP) | PDF

Care for Our Common Home Statement (ESP) | PDF

Additional Resources 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/policies-issues/protect-our-common-home/pastoral-statement-summary-god-calls-us-care-our-common-home

Role of Policy Makers Highlighted in Caring for Our Common Home

In their recent pastoral statement, God Calls Us to Care for Our Common Home, the California Bishops asked all to heed the call to a spiritual conversion that respects our common home and cares for all.  They also identified specific responsibility for lawmakers, public officials and other policy makers who “because of their influence over institutions, have extra responsibilities for upholding the common good.”

Of course, the most visible expression of that responsibility for a lawmaker is through legislation and the California Catholic Conference (CCC) continues to advocate on behalf of many proposals, just as it did prior to the release of Laudato Si’.

For instance, a key piece of legislation supported by the CCC was SR 37, which encouraged the California legislature to study and take into account the Papal Encyclical when considering climate change in relevant legislative action. That resolution was adopted the summer of 2015 a few months after release of the encyclical.

At that same time, the CCC sponsored a unique reflection and dialogue among bishops, lawmakers and staff to discuss the Pope’s Encyclical.  Ever since this early work, the CCC brought a distinct perspective to discussions on environmental questions by lifting up the moral dimensions of these issues and the needs of the most vulnerable among us.

Laudato Si’ awoke urgent moral imperatives and valuable policy implications that must be considered in the public square,” said CCC Director of Education and Environmental Stewardship Ray Burnell. 

“Echoing Pope Francis’ message to the peoples of the world, the CCC consistently advocates public policies that place people at the center of a renewed commitment to be good stewards of the planet entrusted to our care,” he said.

The CCC has proved successful in campaigning for laws that have reduced emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants, promote renewable clean energy, provide safe and affordable drinking water in all communities, educate K-12 environmental literacy, and provide for supplemental environmental projects. (For a listing of environmental legislation the CCC has supported since the release of Ladauto Si’, click here.)

The Conference is also currently working on nine active bills that promotes integral ecology, improves air quality, assures a clean water supply, and safeguards environmental health.

“Each Californian, every elected official, is called upon to embrace an ecological vocation.  Together we must address environmental issues with an integrated approach that combats poverty, restores dignity to the excluded, and at the same time protects nature,” Burnell said.

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/policies-issues/human-dignity/california-catholic-bishops-issue-call-protect-our-common-home/role

Archdiocese mourns loss of Auxiliary Bishop Robert Christian

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/archdiocese-mourns-loss-auxiliary-bishop-robert-christian

SPECIAL EDITION: Bill Threatening Seal of Confession Pulled by Author

SB 360, Legislative Threat to Seal of Confession, Pulled from Committee

The day before hundreds of Catholics were planning to voice their opposition by attending a hearing in the Capitol, SB 360 was pulled from the Assembly Public Safety Committee agenda effectively removing it from any further consideration this year.

SB 360  (Hill, D-San Mateo) attempted to deny the sanctity of confession when it comes to priests and to Catholics who work with priests in parishes, Church agencies and ministries.

The action follows the delivery of tens of thousands of letters, emails and phone calls from Catholics and others concerned with the free expression of religion.  Hundreds more planned on boarding buses from as far away as Los Angeles to voice their opposition.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR EMAILS, PHONE CALLS and LETTERS

Andrew Rivas, executive director of the California Catholic Conference, expressed his thanks to the Californians who reached out to their legislators to oppose SB 360:

“An amazing number of people spoke to their legislators to explain the sacred nature of the Sacrament of Reconciliation,” said Rivas.  “It is important to our spirituality and our relation to God and to others.  Our thanks go to all who played a part.”

Rivas emphasized the strengthening mandatory reporting laws continues to be a priority of the Conference’s public policy efforts.   

Analysis of SB 360 by the staff of the Public Safety Committee also raised significant First Amendment concerns, emphasized that no other state had taken a similar approach and pointed to the impracticality of enforcing the new law.  The analysis also noted the committee had received opposition from more than 125,000 individuals – although emails and letters from several dioceses continued to be delivered after that count was made.

Authors can pull bills for a variety of reasons ranging from not having enough votes to a desire to continue working on details.  Since the California legislature has a two-year session, the bill can still be considered next year.

Related Reactions and Article

Statement from Archbishop José Gomez

Angelus News Story

Bishop Oscar Cantu

National Catholic Register

 

Resources Available on Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops have made materials available to help you urge your U.S. Congressperson to sign the discharge petition and vote to pass the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act (H.R. 962).

July and August are excellent times to engage parishes in taking action. Constituents are encouraged to schedule a meeting with their representative or attend a town hall meeting while he or she is in the home district.  Congress will be on recess August 5–31. The beginner’s lobbying guide mentioned in the leader’s toolkit provides helpful tips on how to have an easy and constructive meeting with your representative.

The leader’s toolkit is available here.

The California Legislature is in recess until August 12, 2019. Public Policy Insights will resume when they return.  Thank you for your advocacy and being a voice for life and dignity in California.

 

U.S. Bishops Affirms that All Should Be Included in Census

Bishop Frank Dewane, of Venice, Florida, Chairman of the USCCB Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development and Bishop Joe Vásquez, of Austin, Texas, Chairman of the Committee on Migration, issued the following statement regarding last week’s decision by the United States Supreme Court in Department of Commerce v. New York, regarding the importance of ensuring an accurate count for the U.S. Census:

“We affirm last week’s decision by the Supreme Court that the inclusion of a citizenship question must ensure genuine reasons for such inclusion. We reaffirm that all persons in the United States should be counted in the Census regardless of their immigration status and reemphasize our judgment that questions regarding citizenship should not be included in the Census. We hope that this view will prevail, whether by administrative action or judicial determination.”

Read more about how the Golden State is handling the census here.

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/special-edition-bill-threatening-seal-confession-pulled-author

EDICIÓN ESPECIAL: Proyecto de ley que amenazaba el Secreto de Confesión retirado por el

El Proyecto SB 360, la amenaza legislativa para el Secreto de Confesión, ha sido retirado del Comité

Un día antes, cuando cientos de católicos se preparaban para expresar su oposición presentándose en una audiencia programada en el Capitolio,  el Proyecto SB 360 fue retirado de la agenda del Comité de Seguridad Pública de la Asamblea.  En la práctica, este proyecto queda eliminado de cualquier otra consideración en este año.

El Proyecto SB 360  (Hill, D-San Mateo) intentó negar la santidad de la confesión en relación a los sacerdotes y a los católicos que colaboran con los sacerdotes en las parroquias, agencias de la Iglesia y ministerios.  

Esta acción se deriva de la entrega de decenas de miles de cartas, correos electrónicos y llamadas de católicos y otras personas preocupadas por la libertad de la expresión religiosa.  Cientos de otras personas pensaban transportarse en autobuses de lugares tan distantes como Los Ángeles para manifestar su oposición.

GRACIAS POR SUS CORREOS ELECTRÓNICOS, LLAMADAS Y CARTAS  

Andrew Rivas, director ejecutivo de la Conferencia Católica de California, expresó su agradecimiento a los californianos que se comunicaron con sus legisladores para oponerse al Proyecto SB 360:

“Un impresionante número de personas hablaron con sus legisladores para explicarles el carácter sagrado del Sacramento de la Reconciliación”, afirmó  Rivas.  “Es importante para nuestra espiritualidad y nuestra relación con Dios y los demás. Les damos las gracias a todos los que hicieron su parte”.  

Rivas recalcó que el fortalecimiento de las leyes de denuncia obligatoria continúan siendo una prioridad de las tentativas de política pública de la Conferencia.

Un análisis del Proyecto SB 360 realizado por el personal del Comité de la Seguridad Pública también expresó importantes preocupaciones en torno a la Primera Enmienda, subrayó que ningún otro estado ha asumido un enfoque similar y señaló la inviabilidad de aplicar esa nueva ley.  El análisis también indicó que el comité recibió la oposición de más de 125,000 individuos – aunque los correos electrónicos y las cartas provenientes de diversas diócesis seguían llegando después de que se hiciera ese conteo. Los autores pueden retirar sus proyectos de ley por diversas razones, que van desde el no tener suficientes votos hasta el deseo de seguir trabajando en los detalles.  Puesto que la legislatura de California tiene una sesión de dos años de duración,  este proyecto de ley aun puede ser considerado el próximo año.

Reacciones relacionadas y artículos

Declaración del Arzobispo José Gómez

Artículo noticioso de la revista Angelus

Obispo Oscar Cantú

National Catholic Register

 

Recursos disponibles sobre la Ley de Protección a los Sobrevivientes del Aborto Nacidos Vivos

La Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los EE.UU. tiene materiales disponibles para ayudarle a que inste a su congresista del gobierno Federal a que firme la solicitud para que se rehabilite y se vote para aprobar la Ley de Protección a los Sobrevivientes del Aborto Nacidos Vivos (H.R. 962).

Julio y agosto son meses idóneos para que las parroquias participen en las acciones de promoción. Se anima a los votantes a que programen una reunión con su representante o a que asistan a una reunión municipal mientras que él/ella se encuentre en su distrito local. El Congreso estará en receso del 5 al 31 de agosto. La guía del principiante para el cabildeo, mencionada en las herramientas para los líderes, provee consejos útiles sobre cómo llevar a cabo una reunión fácil y constructiva con su representante.

El conjunto de herramientas está disponible aquí.

La Legislatura de California está en receso hasta el 12 de agosto de 2019.  Las ediciones de Public Policy Insights (Perspectivas) reanudarán cuando ellos regresen.  Gracias por su labor de promoción y por ser una voz a favor de la vida y la dignidad en California.

 

Obispos de los EE.UU. afirman que todos deberían ser incluidos en el Censo

Mons. Frank Dewane, Obispo de Venice, Florida, presidente del Comité de la Justicia Nacional y Desarrollo Humano de la USCCB y  Mons. Joe Vásquez, Obispo de Austin, Texas, presidente del Comité de Migración, publicaron la siguiente declaración en torno a la decisión de la semana pasada de la Corte Suprema de los Estados Unidos en la causa del Departamento del Comercio v. Nueva York, respecto a la importancia de garantizar un conteo exacto para el Censo de los EE.UU.:

“Afirmamos la decisión de la semana pasada de la Corte Suprema donde la inclusión de una pregunta sobre la ciudadanía debe comprobar que hay razones genuinas para dicha inclusión. Reafirmamos que toda persona en los Estados Unidos deberá ser contada en el Censo, independientemente de su condición migratoria y volvemos a enfatizar nuestra opinión de que las preguntas respecto a la ciudadanía no deberían incluirse en el Censo. Esperamos que esta perspectiva prevalezca, ya sea por acción administrativa o por determinación judicial”.

Lea más sobre cómo el Estado Dorado está manejando el censo aquí.

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/espanol/perspectivas/edici%C3%B3n-especial-proyecto-de-ley-que-amenazaba-el-secreto-de-confesi%C3%B3n-retirado

SB 360, Legislative Threat to Seal of Confession, Pulled from Committee

Learn More
About Religious Liberty

“At the very heart of human freedom is the right to religious freedom, since it deals with man’s most fundamental relationship: his relationship with God.” – Pope John Paul II, Address to Diplomats, January 2005

Religious Liberty at USCCB

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/policies-issues/faith-public-square/sb-360-legislative-threat-seal-confession-pulled-committee

Insights: Bill Targets Migrant Detention Centers; Before You Go

Bill Aims to Increase Transparency at Migrant Detention Centers

It is no secret that conditions in Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) migrant detention camps in California and nationally have questionable living conditions. There have been consistent reports of human rights violations in overwhelmed detention facilities. According to NBC News, there have been 24 deaths in the last two years alone in these facilities.   

Reviews of the centers conducted by the California Attorney General (AG) has shown that available information regarding the treatment of immigration detainees in California is cursory and inconsistent. 

Now, Senator Maria Elena Durazo (D – Los Angeles) is seeking to create greater transparency and ultimately safety for those in detention centers through SB 622 – Dignity in Detention. This bill would ensure there is an immediate investigation when a death occurs in civil custody in California, including immigration detention.

According to Senator Durazo, these centers – like those in Adelanto, McFarland, and Holtville – subcontract all operations of the facilities, and fail to comply with the federally-developed ICE Operations Performance-Based National Detention Standards.

Common issues among a number of facilities include  language barriers, issues with access to medical and mental health care, obstacles to contacting family and other support systems, and barriers to adequate representation.  (See related story of the Bishops pastoral visit to one of these detention facilities last year.)

SB 622 would provide a first step in creating greater transparency in these centers, and take immediate action in the event of the death of a detainee. California authorities would be mandated to investigate the death, which up to this point is handled by several different agencies, all with separate reporting requirement.

The bill has cleared the Senate side and now sits with the Assembly Appropriations Committee. Stay with us for the latest and ways you can help move this bill forward.

 

Action Alerts Before You Leave

Before you head out on that well-deserved summer vacation or break, be sure to review the current list of action alerts from the CCC to let lawmakers hear the Catholic voice. The Legislature will break for summer recess July 12 and return August 12, but there is important work that will take place before legislators sign-off for the month.

Use the links below to quickly send letters and ensure that lawmakers hear from you on these vital bills.

 

U.S. Bishops Detail Accountability Reforms

Earlier this month, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops voted to on several proposals to hold bishops accountable for instances of sexual abuse of children or vulnerable persons, sexual misconduct, or the intentional mishandling of such cases. They also specifically committed to involving and utilizing lay professional experts and established a new, independent mechanism for the reporting of such cases.

The new system commits to the involvement of lay professionals, informs the person asserting an allegation of their rights, establishes a notification process for conflicts of interest, and ensures claims won’t result in prejudice, retaliation, or discrimination.

The new system builds on The Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, more commonly known as the Dallas Charter, which is a comprehensive set of procedures originally established by the USCCB in June 2002 for addressing allegations of sexual abuse of minors by Catholic clergy. The Charter also includes guidelines for reconciliation, healing, accountability, and prevention of future acts of abuse. It was revised in 2005, 2011, and 2018. 

This year’s review resulted in the new system, in which Bishops agreed that third-party, independent oversight is crucial in successfully uncovering, publicizing and punishing bishop misconduct.

Click here for more information on this new process.

 

Hundreds of Thousands Object to SB 360

The final count of letters from the Archdiocese of Los Angeles protesting SB 360 looks like it will total more than 100,000, while more than 19,000 letters have been collected by the Diocese of Sacramento. The Archdiocese of San Francisco has just shy of 18,000. Those are just some of the totals from dioceses around the state as they fight to maintain the seal of confession. 

The bill threatens to remove the right to privacy between a penitent and confessor during the Sacrament of Reconciliation and other spiritual counseling for priests and employees of the Church.

This tremendous outpouring could be amplified by sending a letter if you haven’t already done so. Tell you fellow parishioners as well.

SB 360 will be heard next in the Assembly Public Safety Committee on July 9 – when summer vacations are in full swing.   Check back with www.cacatholic.org or our social media platforms to keep up with developments.

 

Taking Action: Caring for our Common Home

Last week, the California Bishops released God Calls Us All to Care for Our Common Home, a pastoral statement in response to the growing ecological threats to our state.

In it, the Bishops challenge the people of California to appreciate the beauty of the state and to apply – both individually and collectively – the teachings of Laudato Si’ in safeguarding our natural gifts. Click here for a video on the calling.

There are several dioceses already employing green methods that are resulting in tremendous gains for the environment. One-third of the parishes, offices and facilities of the Diocese of Monterey have gone solar, and the counties of Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz now draw on 100 percent carbon and nuclear-free energy largely thanks to efforts of local Catholics. The Diocese of Stockton has been tirelessly working for more than 10 years through its Environmental Justice Project to help steward God’s creation, focusing on recycling and energy efficiency.

These are just two of the inspirational ways that dioceses are heeding the call of the Bishops. We encourage you to connect with your local parish or diocese to put the Bishops’ call into action in the places closest to your own home.

 

There will be no issue next week because of the Independence Day Holiday.  Enjoy the celebration.

 

June 28, 2019
Vol. 12, No. 21

En Español

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/insights-bill-targets-migrant-detention-centers-you-go

Taking Action: Caring for our Common Home

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/taking-action-caring-our-common-home

U.S. Bishops Detail Accountability Reforms

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/us-bishops-detail-accountability-reforms

Bill Aims to Increase Transparency at Migrant Detention Centers

1119 K Street 2nd Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814  |  916 313-4000 | General Email: leginfo@cacatholic.org | © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/bill-aims-increase-transparency-migrant-detention-centers

Perspectivas: Obispos hacen un llamado a favor de la protección del medioambiente; Actualizaciones sobre el Proyecto SB 360

Obispos de CA promulgan llamamiento para la protección de nuestra casa común

Con una apreciación por las numerosas bendiciones naturales del Estado Dorado, a la vez que expresan su creciente preocupación por las amenazas contra nuestro mundo que cobran mayor intensidad, los Obispos Católicos de California han publicado una declaración pastoral haciendo un llamado a toda persona a que “contribuya al bienestar ecológico de nuestro estado”.  

“Publicamos nuestra Declaración Pastoral en el cuarto aniversario de Laudato Si’ en el contexto de este doble enfoque”, afirman los Obispos: “Para animar y estimular la implementación  en California de lo que Laudato Si’ nos llama a hacer, y para ofrecer una herramienta de enseñanza y evangelización dinámica dentro y fuera de nuestra comunidad de fe católica, especialmente para los jóvenes”.  

En DIOS LLAMA A TODOS A CUIDAR NUESTRA CASA COMÚN, los Obispos desafían al pueblo de California a valorar la belleza del estado y aplicar –individual como colectivamente – las enseñanzas de Laudato Si’ para salvaguardar nuestros dones naturales.

La declaración recalca el concepto católico del bien común – “la totalidad de las condiciones sociales que nos permiten tener acceso a los recursos y servicios necesarios para tener una vida digna” – en relación al medio ambiente y al pueblo de California. 

Ésta sigue el concepto de la “ecología integral” primero explorado por el Santo Papa Juan Pablo II y después ampliado por el Papa Francisco.  La enseñanza subraya que la corresponsabilidad por la naturaleza primero debe estar al servicio de la promoción del bien para todos los pueblos, en sus dimensiones ambientales, económicas y culturales.

DIOS LLAMA A TODOS A CUIDAR NUESTRA CASA COMÚN, sobre todo, tiene la finalidad de fomentar las aplicaciones prácticas de esta enseñanza. 

Continúe leyendo

 

Mons. Blaire, Obispo Emérito de Stockton, muere a la edad de 77 años

Mons. Stephen E. Blaire, quien sirviera como obispo de la Diócesis de Stockton por 19 años antes de jubilarse en el 2018, falleció el martes tras una larga enfermedad. Tenía 77 años.

Incluso después de haberse jubilado, el Obispo Blaire siguió activo en el ministerio y en la Iglesia. Una de las aficiones del Obispo Blaire era el cuidado por el medioambiente y la tierra, y fue fundamental para la declaración pastoral de los Obispos DIOS LLAMA A TODOS A CUIDAR NUESTRA CASA COMÚN. Falleció el mismo día que se publicó la declaración.

Dentro de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los EE.UU., Mons. Blaire sirvió como presidente del Comité de Justicia Nacional y Desarrollo Humano, el Comité de Prácticas Pastorales, y fue miembro del Comité de Asuntos Ecuménicos e Interreligiosos. Dentro de la Conferencia Católica de California, fue expresidente de la Conferencia y presidente del Comité de Legislación y Política Pública y del Comité Ad Hoc sobre la Corresponsabilidad Medioambiental, así como miembro del Comité de la Libertad Religiosa. También sirvió en el Comité Ad Hoc sobre Asuntos Ecuménicos.

Haga clic aquí para los detalles fúnebres.

 

Muere obispo DuMaine, fundador de San José

Mons. Pierre DuMaine, quien fuera obispo fundador de la Diócesis de San José y sirviera ahí por 18 años, falleció apaciblemente el 13 de junio, a la edad de 87.

El 27 de enero de 1981, DuMaine fue nombrado primer obispo de la nueva Diócesis de San José por el Papa Juan Pablo II.  El Obispo DuMaine se jubiló en 1998 y fue sucedido por el actual Obispo Patrick McGrath en la Diócesis de San José.

Después de su jubilación, DuMaine siguió activo en los Comités de la Ciencia y Valores Humanos y de la Mujer en la Sociedad y la Iglesia, de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los EE.UU. (USCCB, por sus siglas en inglés).  Él también enseñó en los Departamentos de Estudios Religiosos de la Universidad de Stanford y la Universidad de Santa Clara. Santa Clara lo nombró Profesor Presidencial de la Teología Católica. También fue director fundador de la Red de Televisión Católica en Menlo Park de 1978 a 1981.

Su misa fúnebre se celebrará en la Cathedral Basilica of Saint Joseph en San José el jueves 27 de junio a las 10:00 am.

 

Actualizaciones sobre el Proyecto SB 360 – #KeepTheSeal

Miles de católicos, mediante los esfuerzos de las diócesis de los alrededores de California, están comunicándose con sus asambleístas para que se opongan a la vulneración de la libertad religiosa que el Proyecto SB 360 representa. El proyecto de ley amenaza con eliminar el  derecho a la privacidad entre un penitente y su confesor durante el Sacramento de la Reconciliación y otra consejería espiritual para sacerdotes y empleados de la Iglesia.

El Proyecto SB 360 ahora será atendido en el Comité de Seguridad Pública de la Asamblea, aunque aún no se ha anunciado la fecha.

Agradecemos a las decenas de miles de personas que han enviado cartas y correos electrónicos a sus legisladores pidiéndoles que voten en contra de este proyecto de ley. La lucha está lejos de llegar a su fin, y pedimos que rápidamente se tome el tiempo para enviar una carta.  Sabemos que muchas personas están a punto de empezar a disfrutar de sus vacaciones de verano ahora, pero suplicamos tome un momento para enviar un correo electrónico antes de partir.  Esto marcará una gran diferencia en el resultado.

No podemos sobrevalorar la importancia de esforzarnos para asegurar que este proyecto no se convierta en ley.  Es probable que las graves consecuencias para los sacerdotes y personas de la fe católica se multipliquen si se llega a aprobar este primer paso.

Mientras seguimos vigilando el Proyecto SB 360, permanezca con la CCC para las formas adicionales en que puede ayudarnos a derrotar este proyecto.

 

Semana de la Libertad Religiosa

Súmase a la USCCB del 22 al 29 de junio, para la Semana de la Libertad Religiosa del 2019: Fortaleza en la Esperanza, para orar, reflexionar, y actuar en torno a la libertad religiosa, tanto aquí en este país como en el extranjero. Esto tiene una importancia especial este año, ya que en California luchamos por derrotar el Proyecto SB 360, que procura eliminar la libertad religiosa que es esencial para el Sacramento de la Reconciliación. (Véase el punto más abajo)

La libertad religiosa nos brinda el espacio para cumplir la misión que Jesús encomendó a la Iglesia. La libertad religiosa supone que los católicos, y toda persona de buena voluntad, tiene la libertad de buscar la verdad y vivir de acuerdo a esa verdad, y así fortalecer nuestra vida en común como país.

Haga clic aquí para mayor información.

 

Declaración Pastoral en las noticias:

(Crux)

(National Catholic Reporter)

(America Magazine)

 

21 de junio de  2019
Tomo 12, No. 20

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/espanol/perspectivas/perspectivas-obispos-hacen-un-llamado-favor-de-la-protecci%C3%B3n-del-medioambiente

Insights: Bishops Issue Call to Protect the Environment; Updates on SB 360

CA Bishops Issue Call to Protect Our Common Home

Cherishing the many natural blessings of the Golden State while expressing growing concern with escalating threats to our world, the Catholic Bishops of California have issued a pastoral statement calling on all people to “contribute to the ecological well-being of our state.”

“We are publishing our Pastoral Statement on the fourth anniversary of Laudato Si’ with a two-fold vision in mind,” say the Bishops: “To animate and energize the implementation in California of what Laudato Si’ calls us to do, and to offer a dynamic teaching and evangelization tool for our Catholic faith community and beyond, especially for young people.”

In God Calls Us All to Care for Our Common Home, the Bishops challenge the people of California to appreciate the beauty of the state and to apply – both individually and collectively – the teachings of Laudato Si’ in safeguarding our natural gifts.

The statement emphasizes the Catholic concept of the common good – “the sum total of social conditions that allow us to access the resources and services necessary for a dignified life” — in relationship to the environment and the people of California. 

It follows by building on the concept of “integral ecology” first explored be Saint Pope John Paul II and expanded upon by Pope Francis.  The teaching emphasizes that stewardship of nature must first be at the service of advancing the good of all people in their environmental, economic and cultural dimensions.

God Calls Us All to Care for Our Common Home, most importantly, aims to encourage the practical applications of these teaching. 

Continue Reading

 

Stockton‘s Bishop Emeritus Blaire Dies at 77

Bishop Stephen E. Blaire, who served as bishop of the Diocese of Stockton for 19 years before his retirement in 2018, died Tuesday after a long illness. He was 77.

Even in retirement, Bishop Blaire was active in ministry and the Church. One of Bishop Blaire’s passions was care for the environment and the earth, and he was instrumental in the Bishops’ pastoral statement God Calls Us All to Care for Our Common Home. He passed on the same day the statement was released.

Within the U. S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, Bishop Blaire served as the Chairman of the Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, the Pastoral Practices Committee and was a member of the Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. Within the California Catholic Conference, he was past president of the Conference and chair of the Legislation and Public Policy Committee and the Ad Hoc Committee on Environmental Stewardship, as well as a member of the Religious Liberty Committee. He also served on the Ad Hoc Committee on Ecumenical affairs.

Click here for funeral details.

 

Founding San Jose Bishop DuMaine Dies

Bishop Pierre DuMaine, who was founding Bishop of the Diocese of San Jose and served there for 18 years, passed away peacefully on June 13. He was 87.

On January 27, 1981, DuMaine was named by Pope John Paul II the first bishop of the new Diocese of San Jose. Bishop DuMaine retired in 1998 and was succeeded by current San Jose diocese Bishop Patrick McGrath.

After retirement, DuMaine remained active in the USCCB Committees for Science and Human Values and for Women in Society and the Church. He also taught in Religious Studies Departments of Stanford University and Santa Clara University. Santa Clara appointed him Presidential Professor of Catholic Theology. He also was the founding Director of Catholic Television Network in Menlo Park from 1978 to 1981.

The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Joseph in San Jose on Thursday, June 27, at 10:00 am.

 

Updates on SB 360 – #KeepTheSeal

Thousands of Catholics, through the efforts of dioceses around California, are contracting their Assembly Members to object to the infringement of religious freedom that SB 360 represents. The bill threatens to remove the right to privacy between a penitent and confessor during the Sacrament of Reconciliation and other spiritual counseling for priests and employees of the Church.

SB 360 will be heard next in the Assembly Public Safety Committee though no date has been announced.

Thank you to the tens of thousands who have sent letters and emails to lawmakers asking them to vote against this bill. The fight is far from over, and we ask that you quickly take a moment to send a letter.  We know that many people are enjoying summer vacations now, but please take a moment to send an email before you take off.  It will make a big difference in the outcome.

We cannot overstate the importance of working to ensure that this bill does not become law. The dire consequences for priests and people of the Catholic faith are likely to snowball if this first step is approved.

As we continue to SB 360, stay with the CCC for additional ways you can help us defeat this bill.

 

Religious Freedom Week

Join the USCCB June 22 – June 29, for Religious Freedom Week 2019: Strength in Hope, to pray, reflect, and act on religious liberty, both here in this country and abroad. This is especially important this year as we struggle in California to defeat SB 360, which seeks to eliminate the religious freedom central to the Sacrament of Reconciliation. (See below)

Religious freedom gives us the space to carry out the mission that Jesus has entrusted to the Church. Religious freedom means that Catholics, and all people of goodwill, are free to seek the truth and to live in accordance with that truth, and so to strengthen our common life as a nation.

Click here for more.

 

Pastoral Statement in the News

(Crux)

(National Catholic Reporter)

(America Magazine)

 

June 21, 2019
Vol. 12, No. 20

En Español

 

Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/insights-bishops-issue-call-protect-environment-updates-sb-360

Founding San Jose Bishop DuMaine Dies

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Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/founding-san-jose-bishop-dumaine-dies

Stockton‘s Bishop Emeritus Blaire Dies at 77

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Article source: https://www.cacatholic.org/stockton%E2%80%98s-bishop-emeritus-blaire-dies-77